Anything about anthropocentrism

Von Ranke

Ad Honorem
Nov 2011
6,377
Thistleland
#42
The match is dormy!!! :)
Rubbish I was easily five up with four to play. :)

You were using the royal 'us' then. :D
Aye, a slip up on my part as I should have used the royal "we" as opposed to the common as muck "us". Glad to see you have recovered your sense of humour as this is an essential tool in the forum survival kit. :)
 
#43
Rubbish I was easily five up with four to play. :)

Aye, a slip up on my part as I should have used the royal "we" as opposed to the common as muck "us". Glad to see you have recovered your sense of humour as this is an essential tool in the forum survival kit. :)
"et levitas et gravitas sua tempora habent."

*and with that, Copper faded quietly into the mist, and it was said that he went to rest in a cave, where he sleeps still, awaiting the appointed time, when the songbirds shall sing, and the wales shall wail, and the weasels shall wheeze, and the knickers of righteousness shall come again to the defence of the world's non-human animals*


I always have humour to spare for a fellow Scot. At least I'm assuming 'thistleland' is Scotland.
 
Last edited:
Oct 2016
238
GB
#44
Speak for yourself, my ancestors lived in India and subsisted on a vegetarian diet for centuries. Actually in the past meat was not eaten nearly as regularly as it is now, after the invention of agriculture sedentary peoples cut most of the meat from their diets, with the exception of the idle rich. Apart from anything else, the average peasant could grow their own crops, but often had to pay for meat, notwithstanding the odd rabbit, fish or gamebird that they caught. Plus there were religious restrictions in various places at various times. Not just in India but also in Medieval Europe, when hundreds of days in the year were fast days where eating meat other than fish was not permitted.

Eating meat is not hugely healthy, we can't actually digest it fully because we are not really natural carnivores. It's quite recently in our evolutionary history that we (hominids) started eating meat, and we are far from being 'designed' with it in mind. We just have the minor adaptations needed to allow us to cope with it. Compare us to any obligate carnivore, like cats, and we come out very badly. We can't even eat raw meat: imagine explaining to a tiger that you are a carnivore who can't eat raw meat. They'd laugh you out of the room.
So if I told a tiger I can't eat raw meat it would laugh.....next trip to the zoo should be fun.

Sent from my victara using Tapatalk
 
Apr 2015
1,704
Italy
#45
We've won the evolutionary race but that doesnt mean We should be able to do what We want. Nature to be able to work requires an equilibrium, We Need to be able to develop such equilibrium with our environment or nature Will take the situation in its own hand and when such thing happens it usually means massive extinction

Inviato dal mio Redmi Note 3 utilizzando Tapatalk
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,264
Brassicaland
#46
We've won the evolutionary race but that doesnt mean We should be able to do what We want. Nature to be able to work requires an equilibrium, We Need to be able to develop such equilibrium with our environment or nature Will take the situation in its own hand and when such thing happens it usually means massive extinction

Inviato dal mio Redmi Note 3 utilizzando Tapatalk
The opinion ranges from extreme environmentalism to extreme development-oriented economics.
Some people apparently believe that "as long as it benefits humans, it is acceptable"; unfortunately, we are reaching the limit point!
Let's look at the Global Hectare of Luxembourg vs China, which is 15.8 vs 3.4 per capital.
http://www.footprintnetwork.org/ecological_footprint_nations/
Imagine if average Chinese citizens live like average Luxembourgians, we will probably exhaust our resources even faster!
 
Last edited:
Apr 2015
1,704
Italy
#48
The opinion ranges from extreme environmentalism to extreme development-oriented economics.
Some people apparently believe that "as long as it benefits humans, it is acceptable"; unfortunately, we are reaching the limit point!
Let's look at the Global Hectare of Luxembourg vs China, which is 15.8 vs 3.4 per capital.
http://www.footprintnetwork.org/ecological_footprint_nations/
Imagine if average Chinese citizens live like average Luxembourgians, we will probably exhaust our resources even faster!
Japanese people aren't allowed to buy a car if they have not a place to park it. In Singapore takes on cars are so high due to congestion measures that a Toyota prius there costs like a Ferrari in the united states.

That shows that if you don't take into account
Problems before they fully manifest themselves you end up requiring extreme measures as only solution

Inviato dal mio K013 utilizzando Tapatalk
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,264
Brassicaland
#49
Japanese people aren't allowed to buy a car if they have not a place to park it. In Singapore takes on cars are so high due to congestion measures that a Toyota prius there costs like a Ferrari in the united states.

That shows that if you don't take into account
Problems before they fully manifest themselves you end up requiring extreme measures as only solution

Inviato dal mio K013 utilizzando Tapatalk
In North America and Australia, due to the vast geographic distance and urban sprawl, driving is often assumed.
Japan and Singapore are extremely dense places, and travel over
On the other hand, we have a proliferation of inept drivers; I already learned that I cannot become a competent driver.
Is there a way to eliminate inept drivers, though?
 
Oct 2016
692
On a magic carpet
#50
Posts on page 1 are the reason why humans are likely to wipe out themselves and everything else on earth one day. :)

I think we should respect the nature, and not cut down even a tree, unless we really need to. Not because some rich couple thousands of miles away wants a more expensive coffee table. Animals should be treated with dignity, not like a disposable product. The life energy is in every living thing. We should respect that.
 

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