Anything about bows and crossbows

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
#71
K
I have read that Barwick, Smythe, et al. are often referring to "paces", not "yards". The problem is, there's no accepted measurement of paces. The most frequent guess is 30 inches.
Well, a pace is one step/stride of the foot. Everyone's stride is different but ñMostple's step will be around the same length, give or take few inches, and if really does not matter much if the target you measured out at 100 paces was 3000 in inches (83.3) or 2800 inches (78 yards), . The big problem is that s pacr can be 2 steps , as in the Roman pace. So the distance could be doubld what you think it is, or half. That is major difference.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,292
Brassicaland
#73
Arrows pierce bulletproof vests much better than bullets.
Are you 100% positive? Contemporary bows and crossbows are much more powerful than their medieval counterparts; bolts and arrows are hard to carry around.
Repeating crossbows, in theory, carry bolts similar to cartridges of firearms, I think.
 
Aug 2018
284
Southern Indiana
#74
Are you 100% positive? Contemporary bows and crossbows are much more powerful than their medieval counterparts; bolts and arrows are hard to carry around.
Repeating crossbows, in theory, carry bolts similar to cartridges of firearms, I think.
Look it up, it's easy to check things these days. No Encyclopedia Britannia required.
 
Feb 2011
6,233
#75
Contemporary bows and crossbows are much more powerful than their medieval counterparts
Not necessarily. They are much more efficient than their Medieval counterparts, but Medieval ones have much higher draw weight. Modern bows and crossbows have more power for each pound of draw weight, but most aren't that high in draw weight because they're not aiming to shoot through men in armor.
 
Jul 2016
8,471
USA
#76
Arrows pierce bulletproof vests much better than bullets.
Because body armor designed to stop bullets isn't designed to stop arrows. Or knives for that matter (which is why shank-proof vests are worn by law enforcement in places where the knife threat is higher).

To resist an arrow with modern manufacturing capabilities would be rather easy, though the armor would be less flexible than a kevlar vest, it would still be far less bulky than plates designed to stop high velocity rifle shots.
 
Apr 2018
274
USA
#77
I have read that Barwick, Smythe, et al. are often referring to "paces", not "yards". The problem is, there's no accepted measurement of paces. The most frequent guess is 30 inches.
The the exact distances probably weren't exact, no, but english authors from this period including Smythe and Barwick tend to switch back and fourth between paces and yards or use them interchangeably. Sometimes they'll refer specifically to the "Venetian pace" or "geometrical pace" which was 5 feet long, or they'll clarify that by "pace" they mean just a single step of around 2-2.5 feet, but I usually see that come up in translations of foreign works, and when it does the translator will usually include a note in the margin to clarify what the author means when he says "pace" presumably because that's a definition that he doesn't think his audience would be too familiar with.

tl;dr: England at the time already had a unit of measurement that was very similar to the pace called the "yard", so even back then most people started to assume they were the same thing and use the terms interchangeably.
 

Similar History Discussions