Anything about the human body

Mar 2017
801
Colorado
#41
I think our intelligence has, so far, worked against our physical limitations. By that I mean that we are built for walking long distances, not building Great Pyramids, Great Walls or anything else that requires heavy lifting and the strain it puts on the vertebrae and the lumbar muscles and knee and other joints. We have crippled ourselves, and not just by heavy labor, but in other ways, like sitting on a chair, risking DVT, peering at a monitor, which is not good for our eyes, and risking repetitive strain injury or even carpal tunnel syndrome as our fingers tap away.
There's another way we cripple ourselves. Human evolution/adaptation has stopped. I'm not suggesting any kind of eugenics selecting out desirable traits. I'm merely observing that natural selection is based on individuals having non-advantageous traits not living to breeding age.

One of my children has severe disabilities. He would have died at 15 without radical surgery. He'll never be cured and would likely pass on at least a predisposition to his diseases. In the past, he would not have survived to have children. I'm glad he's alive.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,171
Brassicaland
#42
Of all the animal species in the world, why is human birth so life threatening to both the mother and child? Even elephants with a ~100lb baby don't have that much trouble.

I read an anthropology paper that discussed a woman's hips as being a compromise between giving birth and walking upright. There ARE no other mammals that routinely walk on two legs to compare to. Basically, the hips narrowed (making birth tighter) to support a walk ... rather than a waddle. Look at apes who temporarily walk on two legs. <Forgive me if this is a repost within this thread>

There was also a book published in the 70's called "The Naked Ape." My recollection is that it's "pseudo-science" at the start of the"socio-biology" ... fad? It describes a notion that a woman's enlarged breasts (compared to other apes) are meant to draw the male around to frontal intercourse, as a reminder of buttocks: the concept of "socio" biology is that societal/relationship pressures push adaptation. There's a complicated explanation of how face-to-face was important for bonding ... or some such. Since apes occasionally use this posture, I think this interpretation is highly suspect.

As for tools? Opposable thumbs and two free arms allowed humans to master their environment. There are many, many animals from apes to birds that use tools: none of them can throw a spear, or make & lift bricks ... or make elegant, painted Grecian pottery just for fun.

For a long time, Neanderthals were interpreted as stupid, hulking also rans. Then they found tools, and jewelry, and flutes. Whoopsy!!
Neanderthals are too similar to us that the very thought of recreating the "species" (breed?) of humans is controversial, and I think controversial is an understatement.
Intelligence and cognition aside, Neanderthals are known to be similar to "dwarfs" in fantasies, stocky, strong, and relatively short.
 
Mar 2017
801
Colorado
#43
Neanderthals are too similar to us that the very thought of recreating the "species" (breed?) of humans is controversial, and I think controversial is an understatement.
Intelligence and cognition aside, Neanderthals are known to be similar to "dwarfs" in fantasies, stocky, strong, and relatively short.
"Anatomical evidence suggests they were much stronger than modern humans while they were comparable to modern humans in height; based on 45 long bones from at most 14 males and 7 females, Neanderthal males averaged 164&#8211;168 cm (65&#8211;66 in) and females 152&#8211;156 cm (60&#8211;61 in) tall.
Samples of 26 specimens in 2010 found an average weight of 77.6 kg (171 lb) for males and 66.4 kg (146 lb) for females. A 2007 genetic study suggested some Neanderthals may have had red hair.
"

Neaderthals:
Male - 5.5-5.6' 171lbs
Female - 5.0-5.1' 146lbs

Sapiens (current North America):
Male - 5.9' 172lbs
Female - 5.4' 162lbs

Let's not comment on female weight.

I can't find the reference. I read that if you put heavy duty Neanderthal inter-costal rib muscles on a modern human, the ribs would snap.

This is a very nice comparison of Neanderthal reconstructions over the last 100 yrs:
https://www.abroadintheyard.com/evolution-of-neanderthals-over-last-100-years-says-more-about-us/
 
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VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,171
Brassicaland
#44
With dinosaurs there is also the factor of them having 80 chromosomes compared to our 23. This gives far greater scope for evolution to adapt rapidly to changes in the environment. That's why there are 10,000+ species of maniraptorans and about 5,500 species of mammal. I used that terminology to show that as far as mammals go, what we have is the totality of mammals ranging in diversity from the shrew to the blue whale. Birds, while being the only surviving dinosaurs, are not the totality of dinosaurs, with birds only representing one small group, the maniraptora. An equivalent situation for mammals would be if all of them were a variety of feline. The point here is that birds are extraordinarily successful and they do what they do better than we do what we do, and here I mean humans specifically as nobody would say that a dolphin is not a superb example of how evolution can adapt an animal to it's environment.

I think our intelligence has, so far, worked against our physical limitations. By that I mean that we are built for walking long distances, not building Great Pyramids, Great Walls or anything else that requires heavy lifting and the strain it puts on the vertebrae and the lumbar muscles and knee and other joints. We have crippled ourselves, and not just by heavy labor, but in other ways, like sitting on a chair, risking DVT, peering at a monitor, which is not good for our eyes, and risking repetitive strain injury or even carpal tunnel syndrome as our fingers tap away.
Most of our current activities are unnatural; then, we should have better understanding of our limits as humans.
The structure and abilities of birds' eyes may be the dream of many humans (20/2 visual acuity, natural HD vision, pentachromacy, are among some visual feats of many birds).
Even the neural density of birds may be "useful" for humans.

There's another way we cripple ourselves. Human evolution/adaptation has stopped. I'm not suggesting any kind of eugenics selecting out desirable traits. I'm merely observing that natural selection is based on individuals having non-advantageous traits not living to breeding age.

One of my children has severe disabilities. He would have died at 15 without radical surgery. He'll never be cured and would likely pass on at least a predisposition to his diseases. In the past, he would not have survived to have children. I'm glad he's alive.
Inherited diseases are so haphazard that they cannot be predictable; then, we have not fully manipulated genetic engineering YET.
It would be fairly revolutionary if we can restore lost body parts or functions 100% due to diseases or accidents, and we are very far from this YET.
This will be an end; if there are 100 steps to reach it, we should not neglect even one step.
 
Oct 2018
655
Adelaide south Australia
#45
Atheists are absolutists?

Really. I didn't know that, what with being one and all.

OF COURSE some atheists are absolute in their thinking. IE They make the assertion. " There is no God" . This is a positive claim, and as such attracts the burden of proof.I wish anyone holding that view he best of luck in trying to prove it. If successful, they will be the first person in recorded history to do so.

I, and most atheists I've met in life and on line, make no claims about the existence of gods. If you are interested, there is a plethora of atheist forums on line. I've belonged to several ,over several years.

I am an agnostic atheist. That simply means I do not believe in the supernatural, gods, the soul, angels, demons, ghosts, the paranormal , mountain trolls or fairies at the bottom of my garden. I do not claim to know.

The reason I don't believe is the absence of proof for any of those things.

I do not conflate 'evidence and 'proof' because they are not the same.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,171
Brassicaland
#46
Atheists are absolutists?

Really. I didn't know that, what with being one and all.

OF COURSE some atheists are absolute in their thinking. IE They make the assertion. " There is no God" . This is a positive claim, and as such attracts the burden of proof.I wish anyone holding that view he best of luck in trying to prove it. If successful, they will be the first person in recorded history to do so.

I, and most atheists I've met in life and on line, make no claims about the existence of gods. If you are interested, there is a plethora of atheist forums on line. I've belonged to several ,over several years.

I am an agnostic atheist. That simply means I do not believe in the supernatural, gods, the soul, angels, demons, ghosts, the paranormal , mountain trolls or fairies at the bottom of my garden. I do not claim to know.

The reason I don't believe is the absence of proof for any of those things.

I do not conflate 'evidence and 'proof' because they are not the same.
Something we simply cannot understand; I dislike Christianity because they pretend to have the answers.
The spirit of "look the world frankly in the face" (Bertrand Russell) or "working upon reality" (实事求是) is quite against Christianity, which is mostly based on faith and illusion.
When we work with reality, the best we can do is:
Eggs came way before chickens.
Archaea may be the oldest extent organisms.
The Sun is about 50 billion years old.
The furthest object we know is GN-z11 galaxy.
Then, why do any people bother with origin at all?

Now, back to the topic itself.
The human body is prone to many issues, and repairs are way more complicated than machines.
Genetic manipulation isn't that simple at all.

Fight Aging!
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,171
Brassicaland
#48
Disease / Cancer isn't a defect, it's the result of aging, and how we die. Consciousness can't, and will never be uploaded to anything.

One way or another people will always die.
Of course we all die physically.
The issue is to thrive as much as possible.
 

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