Archaeology Updates (India)

Oct 2015
1,138
India
The above excavations were done by state archaeological department. Same about Keezhadi excavation in Tamil Nadu which were mentioned by @Cobra Arbok . In local papers there are lots of complaints that ASI is not giving attention to Keezhadi.

It seems that state departments are more keen and better able to pursue local excavations and funding should be assigned to them. ASI should take the role of a funding body.
 

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,606
USA
Aryans would have been present around Punjab atleast by 2000 BC imo. Take OCP for example. OCP and copper hoard culture are increasingly being attested together. OCP had certain elements believed to be of Indo-european such as usage of copper weapon, chariots etc. They weren't an entirely alien culture either. They were influenced by Harappans. Take example of the presence of a 'horned deity' on the OCP coffins excavated from Sanauli. It does reminds us of Harappan contacts.
Harappan contacts? For God's sake, they haven't even finished dating of those finds! Red Rigveda, Indra might be the horned deity - Harappan or otherwise. There is a hymn that mentions that Indra is the lord of beings. I'll post that when I get time.

And no, if we were to go by the evidence of the flow of Saraswati in various Vedic scriptures, it very clearly looks like they were the native inhabitants. They were not coming to their own homeland after 2000 BCE or 1500 BCE. It makes zero sense for such assumptions.
 
May 2013
1,725
The abode of the lord of the north
Harappan contacts? For God's sake, they haven't even finished dating of those finds! Red Rigveda, Indra might be the horned deity - Harappan or otherwise. There is a hymn that mentions that Indra is the lord of beings. I'll post that when I get time.
Do you really read what I'm trying to say? I just said OCP wasn't a totally alien culture; There are cultural markers aligned with Harappan. We know OCP was a fierce culture like that in Vedas. So I was actually saying Harappans also might've had some vedic elements in it.

And no, if we were to go by the evidence of the flow of Saraswati in various Vedic scriptures, it very clearly looks like they were the native inhabitants. They were not coming to their own homeland after 2000 BCE or 1500 BCE. It makes zero sense for such assumptions.
Again, I said they would have been around Punjab atleast by 2000 BC in my opinion. I didn't say they came totally after 2000 BC or 1500 BC. That's just my opinion, but do you really read before replying?!
 

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,606
USA
Do you really read what I'm trying to say? I just said OCP wasn't a totally alien culture; There are cultural markers aligned with Harappan. We know OCP was a fierce culture like that in Vedas. So I was actually saying Harappans also might've had some vedic elements in it.


Again, I said they would have been around Punjab atleast by 2000 BC in my opinion. I didn't say they came totally after 2000 BC or 1500 BC. That's just my opinion, but do you really read before replying?!
Yes I read what you wrote and I'm aware of the OCP culture. What I wrote was that the age of the Sanauli finds are not firmly established yet. They may turn out to be more ancient than 2000 - 1800 BCE. In that case, how could we even call that culture later Harappan (according to certain scholars)? They may or may not be a totally different civilization (why would we talk about contacts in such a case?). Moreover, it seems from the initial read that the OCP has its Westernmost border in Rajasthan. But we know that the Atreyas of the 5th Mandala of Rig Veda are primarily in what is now Pakistan and Afghanistan, while VasishtAs, VishwAmitrAs, etc.. are around the Eastern side, i.e. HaryANa. What I am wondering is whether we are barking up the wrong tree! All this while, we claimed that Vedic people were PGW, and now we started saying they were OCP.

My apologies if I seemed to jump guns regarding 2000 BCE. It has nothing to do with your position per se. I'm intrigued at the fixation of the people with the "coming" of Aryans as such. Why are we hell bent upon making them "come" into India, while they were the natives of India? How do you even connect a culture with pottery while there is no mention of pottery styles in Rig Veda?. Yes, in Yajur Veda, there is mention of vessels and utensils used in a sacrifice, and that may be a clue, but Rig Veda, I don't think there is any.

In my opinion, the timeline of drying of Saraswati would clearly provide clue of the timeline of Vedic people, but there are so many theories! In my opinion, this clue would be more reliable than any of the genetic studies conducted (those genetic studies are based on models, and could give us results based on the model we select, correct me if I'm wrong). If the Saraswati completely dried up in 5000 BCE, then the Rig Veda or even Mahabharata were before that, as simple as that.
 
Jan 2019
20
Tallahassee, Florida
Ancient lovers found in Indian burial site mystify and intrigue archaeologists

By Tara John and Subhrangshu Pratim Sarmah, CNN
Updated 15:51 PM PHT Thu, January 10, 2019
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(CNN) — Between 4500 and 2500 BC, the bodies of a couple, believed to be married, were placed carefully side by side in an ancient burial site of the Harappans, one of the world's earliest civilizations.
Thousands of years later, in 2013, a team of Indian and South Korean researchers began excavation work in the necropolis now located in Rakhigarhi -- around 100 miles northwest of India's capital, New Delhi -- in a bid to extract DNA from the skeletal remains.
They discovered dozens of skeletons during the excavation process, which ended three years later. Their finds included the couple, the scientists said in a study published in the peer-reviewed ACB Journal of Anatomy. They believe this is the first Harappan pair confirmed to have been buried together.
"Observation revealed that they died at the same time and they were buried at the same time," said Vasant Shinde, the archeologist who led the team.
The skull of the man was found facing the body of his female partner. "They were intimately placed in the burial," Shinde said. "So we thought maybe they shared [a] very intimate relationship" and were probably husband and wife.
Shrouded in history
Shinde added that the couple must have been married "because, had they been in an illicit relationship, the community would not have [given] them a proper ceremonial burial."
But one major mystery remained: How did these Bronze Age lovebirds die at the same time? Were they wiped out in a plague? Killed in a ritual death? Or did this star-crossed pair take their own lives?
The archeologists couldn't find any trace of disease, nor were there any injury marks to the skeletons that would have suggested they were killed. "Our guess is that probably they may have died of heart failure," Shinde said, before adding that this was just speculation.
In the paper, the scientists ruled out the possibility that the woman, believed to be in her early 20s, took her own life shortly after the death of her husband, who was between 35 and 40 years old.
"The couple's burial ... should not be considered to have been the outcome of any specific funeral customs commonly performed at that time," the study said, referring to a ritual in which a wife would kill herself after the death of her husband. "Rather, it is more plausible that two individuals died at or almost at the same time, and that therefore, they had been buried together in the same grave."
The researchers said more studies of Harappan graves are needed to solve the mystery, "as joint burials are important for inferring historical family structures and the broader society they represent."
Fascination and debate
Archaeologists also found pots in the grave, which would have contained food and water: grave offerings for the dead. One agate bead, "possibly a part of a necklace, was found near the right collar bone" of the male skeleton, they said.
Couple burials like the one in Rakhigarhi have long been a source of fascination and fierce speculation, the scientists added.
In 2007, archeologists excavating a Neolithic burial site in Italy found a couple locked in a tender embrace. It is still a matter of debate how the Lovers of Valdaro, as they came to be known, died.
The same is true of another case in Siberia, where the couple were found facing each other and holding hands.
For now, the team in India will continue extracting DNA from their finds. "Our ultimate goal is to understand the social composition of [the] human population there" and the relationship between the Harappan and contemporary population, Shinde said.
This story was first published on CNN.com, "Ancient lovers found in Indian burial site mystify and intrigue archaeologists."
 
May 2013
1,725
The abode of the lord of the north
Sanauli turns interesting apparently.
Artifacts unearthed in the second phase includes Copper studded wooden shields, Copper chalices and a vessel/helmet kinda object.





Also, brick patterns distinct from Harappans is reportedly being observed.



Might be a different civilization!
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,837
New Delhi, India
(ii) Zoroastrian list of 16 Aryanam Vajehos (16 areas which are homes of Aryan), one of which was 'Sapta Sindhu'.
You must note that it was the fifteenth, the penultimate homeland. So, a lot of history preceded it, starting from 'Sugdha' (Sogdiana, Samarkand), the second.
Sarayu is interesting. It is first used as a western tributary of Indus. Later scriptures associates the river to much further east, in kosala kingdom!
If you mean 'Haroyu' (River Herat, Hari-Rud, Tezden), that is not a tributary of Indus. It is a river starting from the Southern slopes of Hindukush, which turns North after Herat and empties in a marshland near Tejen in Turkmenistan.
 
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