Architects working in the fields of History & Archeology

May 2011
832
Bulgaria
#1
Hi there!
I am opening this thread with the hope that anyone professionally occupied with history can share their experience with architects.

But first some backstory!
Since early childhood I have always been fascinated with history and this interest of mine has never waned.
Despite this, I never pursued a career in the field, since my parent's (and unfortunately my own) impression is that the income is not good enough to support a family. So, I am currently studying architecture which is actually very creative and inspiring.
I've had History of Architecture courses every year but this time I am working on a project involving the settlements from Antiquity near my home town. And this is when I have felt my biggest satisfaction every since I was accepted in the university.
This leads me to the question:

What are my options as an architect if I want to get involved in the fields of history and archeology?

I have already chosen my graduation and pre-graduation works in Residential Architecture (>higher chance of finding a job here). I hope I'll work strictly as an architect until I am able to settle.
But once this is achieved I will be looking for any chance to achieve the cross point between my two passions.

Evaluation, restoration, preservation, reconstruction of historical sites is what comes on top of my mind. My university offers some courses on these fields and I've booked myself already for next semester. I don't have much detail on how the actual work feels like.
Besides that, what is the prospect on being a self-funded off-the-clock enthusiast?

Any info and advice is more than welcome!
Thanks in advance!
 

Toltec

Ad Honorem
Apr 2008
7,923
Hyperborea
#2
I don't know about Bulgaria but here in the UK the conservation work I have come across has been done by private companies, any conservation work is put up for tender and building companies bid for it. Also a lot of the companies that offer conservation work do it as an additional service to regular building work, so they are looking for people who have conservation as an additional skill to regular building.
 
May 2011
832
Bulgaria
#3
I appreciate the reply!
Haven't honestly seen a construction company here offering conservation service. Usually they announce the findings to the local authority who in turn either call the Ministry of Culture or their own people to do the job. I will have to research where the funding comes from - whether the constructors pay for the effort or the state.
Thank you for pointing a direction to look for info!
 

bartieboy

Ad Honorem
Dec 2010
6,616
The Netherlands
#4
Dear Petyo, I myself am studying to become an architect of the urban public space.
There are more than enough options for people with an interest in history in our area, for example, you could become an expert in making designs for areas that have a strong relation to your field of interest.

Not to long ago I hear about a landscape architect who specialized in bunkers from the cold war area, after her study she went on to study history and nowadays when someone has a project in an area with cold war bunkers, she is hired.
 
May 2011
832
Bulgaria
#5
Dear Petyo, I myself am studying to become an architect of the urban public space.
There are more than enough options for people with an interest in history in our area, for example, you could become an expert in making designs for areas that have a strong relation to your field of interest.
Nice to meet a colleague!:)
You make a good point. I'm afraid though that the local demand of historical arch. designs is limited to the style from the National Revival, Ottoman period. (which is the part of our history of architecture most displeasing to me). This traditional architecture here is mainly a product of a second-class society obsessed with seclusion. I love the rationality in our modern designs and the aesthetics in Antique & early Medieval architecture. The only traditional buildings which follow more ancient styles here are the Orthodox churches.
So If I am to take your advice I really should start thinking more globally.
Not to long ago I hear about a landscape architect who specialized in bunkers from the cold war area, after her study she went on to study history and nowadays when someone has a project in an area with cold war bunkers, she is hired.
Making use of the old bunkers is an amazing idea actually!:) I immediately thought, after reading your post, of a couple of abandoned bunkers which are near a game reserve. Perfect for hunter lodges!

Anyway, thank you for your reply! I will spend some time looking who and how has built some of the designs I've seen which fit my idea of incorporation between history and architecture.
 

Edratman

Ad Honorem
Feb 2009
6,587
Eastern PA
#8
It sounds like a good plan Petyo and bears a close relationship to the advice I have given many times before.

To digress a little, when you travel to LA, every single waiter/waitress will tell you that their real profession is an actor. I tell people to take a lesson from that; pursue your real interests as hobbies while engaged in a more lucrative profession. That will afford you the wherewithal to pursue the hobby. And just maybe, everything will work out.
 
May 2011
832
Bulgaria
#9
It sounds like a good plan Petyo and bears a close relationship to the advice I have given many times before.

To digress a little, when you travel to LA, every single waiter/waitress will tell you that their real profession is an actor. I tell people to take a lesson from that; pursue your real interests as hobbies while engaged in a more lucrative profession. That will afford you the wherewithal to pursue the hobby. And just maybe, everything will work out.
Somehow I've missed your comment, so apologies for the late reply. Thank you for the advice! As long as I manage to balance enough time for both work and hobby, this seems like the perfect scenario. :)
 

bartieboy

Ad Honorem
Dec 2010
6,616
The Netherlands
#10
Nice to meet a colleague!:)
You make a good point. I'm afraid though that the local demand of historical arch. designs is limited to the style from the National Revival, Ottoman period. (which is the part of our history of architecture most displeasing to me). This traditional architecture here is mainly a product of a second-class society obsessed with seclusion. I love the rationality in our modern designs and the aesthetics in Antique & early Medieval architecture. The only traditional buildings which follow more ancient styles here are the Orthodox churches.
So If I am to take your advice I really should start thinking more globally.
It does not necessarily have to be a project with great historical meaning but it comes in very handy when a designer has historical awareness and can take inspiration in the historical background of a project.


Making use of the old bunkers is an amazing idea actually!:) I immediately thought, after reading your post, of a couple of abandoned bunkers which are near a game reserve. Perfect for hunter lodges!
You might like this project by one of the companies where I had an internship.


You would have to translate the page to get the whole story but I think it's worth it.
?Objets Trouvés? | B + B

Anyway, thank you for your reply! I will spend some time looking who and how has built some of the designs I've seen which fit my idea of incorporation between history and architecture.
No problem, I like to talk about the topic :)
 

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