Architects working in the fields of History & Archeology

Apr 2019
1
Kerala
#11
Hi
I am from India . I went through your conversation and found I have the same interest . I am currently working as an architect . I have always been fascinated with history of Architecture and wanted to learn more about it. I couldn't find any other courses apart from Architectural conservation and there is an another course in CEPT university . I am struggling to find if there is any other courses available in archeology or in Architecture . If anyone could suggest me or guide me it would be really helpful .
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,383
San Antonio, Tx
#12
I don't know about Bulgaria but here in the UK the conservation work I have come across has been done by private companies, any conservation work is put up for tender and building companies bid for it. Also a lot of the companies that offer conservation work do it as an additional service to regular building work, so they are looking for people who have conservation as an additional skill to regular building.
I’m an architect in Texas. We have a firm that counts “historic preservation” as the main part of our practice. We employ 30+ architects, interior designers and construction management. Possibly the most important part of our practice is “historic preservation” but we do have many other specialties.

Historic Preservation is a recognized field in the US even if our buildings aren’t all that old. With a number of old Spanish Colonial Missions, the Alamo and lots and lots of older buildings, there’s always a great deal to do here. There are lots of US universities that offer courses in historic preservation as part of their architecture curriculum and others that offer degrees purely in historic preservation. The University of Virginia is a good place to start looking.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,383
San Antonio, Tx
#13
I’m a ret
Hi there!
I am opening this thread with the hope that anyone professionally occupied with history can share their experience with architects.

But first some backstory!
Since early childhood I have always been fascinated with history and this interest of mine has never waned.
Despite this, I never pursued a career in the field, since my parent's (and unfortunately my own) impression is that the income is not good enough to support a family. So, I am currently studying architecture which is actually very creative and inspiring.
I've had History of Architecture courses every year but this time I am working on a project involving the settlements from Antiquity near my home town. And this is when I have felt my biggest satisfaction every since I was accepted in the university.
This leads me to the question:

What are my options as an architect if I want to get involved in the fields of history and archeology?

I have already chosen my graduation and pre-graduation works in Residential Architecture (>higher chance of finding a job here). I hope I'll work strictly as an architect until I am able to settle.
But once this is achieved I will be looking for any chance to achieve the cross point between my two passions.

Evaluation, restoration, preservation, reconstruction of historical sites is what comes on top of my mind. My university offers some courses on these fields and I've booked myself already for next semester. I don't have much detail on how the actual work feels like.
Besides that, what is the prospect on being a self-funded off-the-clock enthusiast?

Any info and advice is more than welcome!
Thanks in advance!
I’m a retired American architect. My company - 40-60 employees - did a great deal of historic preservation work all over the state of Texas. Your interest in both history and architecture is a natural fit for many companies in the US where historic preservation has become a big field and specialty in architecture. Your desire to combine architecture and a love of history is a good one.
 
Jul 2013
10,383
San Antonio, Tx
#14
Hi
I am from India . I went through your conversation and found I have the same interest . I am currently working as an architect . I have always been fascinated with history of Architecture and wanted to learn more about it. I couldn't find any other courses apart from Architectural conservation and there is an another course in CEPT university . I am struggling to find if there is any other courses available in archeology or in Architecture . If anyone could suggest me or guide me it would be really helpful .
Maybe this thread is “too old” and I’ll be scolded by the Ops for replying. I’m an architect. I was part owner of a substantial architectural practice. An important part of that practice was Historical Preservation. We had a firm of 60+ architects and interior designers and we were practicing in the discipline since the mid-1950s. We “restored” many of the outstanding historic structures around the state of Texas, including the Texas State Capitol.

Historic Preservation is a recognized discipline in American architectural practice. This was not always the case. Up until the 1950s a lot of our most historic buildings were either neglected or demolished, except for a few colonial structures centered on such cities as Philadelphia.. This is no longer permitted, at least in Texas. If the building has historical value, it cannot be demolished however much the property developer might wish to do so. Even then, some building are demolished over night so it is not a panacea.

We have specialists on staff who work exclusively in this field although the “office” also did general, “Modern” architecture - schools, residences for the overprivileged, legitimate theatres and so on, but Historic Preservation has always been a specialty of the firm since the late fifties (the firm was founded in 1939 and one of its first projects was the restoration of a whole historic district related the founding of the Spanish Colonial city. Since at the time there were virtually no architectural firms in the state which practiced historic preservation, we made a reputation in this field. Most architects at the time scorned fixing up old buildings, but eventually, San Antonio became known for the preservation of older historic structures.

Now San Antonio is not an old city by world standards but it is quite old by American standards, having been founded as a city early in the 18th century.

This is a great “specialty” to have.
 
Jul 2013
10,383
San Antonio, Tx
#15
Maybe this thread is “too old” and I’ll be scolded by the Ops for replying. I’m an architect. I was part owner of a substantial architectural practice. An important part of that practice was Historical Preservation. We had a firm of 60+ architects and interior designers and we were practicing in the discipline since the mid-1950s. We “restored” many of the outstanding historic structures around the state of Texas, including the Texas State Capitol.

Historic Preservation is a recognized discipline in American architectural practice. This was not always the case. Up until the 1950s a lot of our most historic buildings were either neglected or demolished, except for a few colonial structures centered on such cities as Philadelphia.. This is no longer permitted, at least in Texas. If the building has historical value, it cannot be demolished however much the property developer might wish to do so. Even then, some building are demolished over night so it is not a panacea.

We have specialists on staff who work exclusively in this field although the “office” also did general, “Modern” architecture - schools, residences for the overprivileged, legitimate theatres and so on, but Historic Preservation has always been a specialty of the firm since the late fifties (the firm was founded in 1939 and one of its first projects was the restoration of a whole historic district related the founding of the Spanish Colonial city. Since at the time there were virtually no architectural firms in the state which practiced historic preservation, we made a reputation in this field. Most architects at the time scorned fixing up old buildings, but eventually, San Antonio became known for the preservation of older historic structures.

Now San Antonio is not an old city by world standards but it is quite old by American standards, having been founded as a city early in the 18th century.

This is a great “specialty” to have.
 

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