Architecture of the Seljuk Turks

Jan 2012
793
#22
this forum supposed to be more then just showing some photos. at least add some details below them(if you have an idea about the architecture)
Great photos, but please give the locations of any [to those that no refer] and refer some information about each, if possible, as koseku also mention.
 
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May 2014
57
ISTANBUL
#23
Great photos, but please give the locations of any and refer some about each, if possible, as koseku also mention.
Thank you..and yes I think I gave their locations..The only one I didnt mention was the mosque with the Golden dome..It was built for the Turkmenbashi shortly before he died..It is in Ashgabat and thats where he is buried..It is the biggest mosque in Turkistan (central asia as russians refers to it)..I attended his funeral by the way and I was Inside in his palace :zany:
 
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Apr 2013
1,570
İslambol
#25
its explain to how anatolians become muslim. everything in Anatolia built by Anatolians

Hittite eagle



savages cant build anything they dont have architecture :D
You are saying rubbish. First of, the double headed eagle is not an uncommon symbol and it has been used in the past by different empires.

Take a look to this extract from this book below :

A Wandering Scholar in the Levant - David George Hogarth - Google Books

[...]
On the side of the north-eastern portal is carved the twin-headed eagle, which was a Seljuk emblem before it reached Europe [...]


I suggest also that you read the following article on the symbolism of "The Eagle" :

The Eagle

[...]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, Sans]The legend of how it came to be adopted by the Emperors at Constantinople may or may not be true, but it is certainly not correct to say that the Seljuk Turks adopted it from the ruins of Euyuk, for Tatar coins antedating the occupation of the Asia Minor country by the Seljuks have been found. As to the device at Euyuk, it is not the most ancient representation of the double-headed eagle by any means if the figure of a comb, No. 10, plate XXIX, in Petrie's Prehistoric Egypt be, as I think it is, an attempt to carve it.[/FONT]
[...]
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,797
Western Eurasia
#26
wow great photos from T├╝rkmenistan Camoka, thanks for sharing it! it is not a well known tourist destination so very interesting to see pictures from there.
 
Aug 2013
298
Germany
#27
You are saying rubbish. First of, the double headed eagle is not an uncommon symbol and it has been used in the past by different empires.

Take a look to this extract from this book below :

A Wandering Scholar in the Levant - David George Hogarth - Google Books

[...]
On the side of the north-eastern portal is carved the twin-headed eagle, which was a Seljuk emblem before it reached Europe [...]


I suggest also that you read the following article on the symbolism of "The Eagle" :

The Eagle

[...]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, Sans]The legend of how it came to be adopted by the Emperors at Constantinople may or may not be true, but it is certainly not correct to say that the Seljuk Turks adopted it from the ruins of Euyuk, for Tatar coins antedating the occupation of the Asia Minor country by the Seljuks have been found. As to the device at Euyuk, it is not the most ancient representation of the double-headed eagle by any means if the figure of a comb, No. 10, plate XXIX, in Petrie's Prehistoric Egypt be, as I think it is, an attempt to carve it.[/FONT]
[...]
The double-headed eagle is an international symbol and it was actually always present in human civilization. The oldest double-headed eagle symbol can be found in the archeological remains of the Hittite civlization.
 
May 2014
57
ISTANBUL
#28
wow great photos from T├╝rkmenistan Camoka, thanks for sharing it! it is not a well known tourist destination so very interesting to see pictures from there.

Thank you..Yes, alot to see there and also in Uzbekistan. Would love to see Hungary some day too.. :)
 
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