Are all Gods anthropomorphic?

Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,759
Romania
#42
Last edited:

Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,759
Romania
#43
From St. John Chrysostom's Homily 12, on Matthew 3:16:
Reflect now on the greatness of the gift, and do not account His dignity the less for His appearing in such a likeness. For I actually hear some saying, that such as is the difference between a man and a dove, so great is that between Christ and the Spirit: since the one appeared in our nature, the other in the likeness of a dove. What must we say then to these things? That the Son of God did indeed take upon Him the nature of man, but the Spirit took not on Him the nature of a dove. Therefore the evangelist also said not, in the nature of a dove, but in the form of a dove. Accordingly, never after did He so much as appear in this fashion, but at that moment only. And if on this account you affirm His dignity to be less, the cherubim too will be made out by this reasoning much His superior, even as much so as an eagle is to a dove: because they too were figured into that visible shape. And the angels too superior again, for they no less have many times appeared in the fashion of men. But these things are not so, indeed they are not. For the truth of an economy is one thing, and the condescension of a temporary vision another.
 

Tsar

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
2,010
Serbia
#44
Can you try to express what exactly is not clear to you from my words? How are they contradicted by the links you provided above? What means that "ὡς" serves as "introduction to similes"? Can't you see any relation between "simile" and "similarity"?


Blue is what you ignored.

From St. John Chrysostom's Homily 12, on Matthew 3:16:
Who is talking about the nature of dove?
 

Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,759
Romania
#45

Tsar

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
2,010
Serbia
#46
Not at all! For example in my language a simile is introduced with "ca", and the Romanian translation of St. Luke's words is "ca un porumbel", literally in English "like a dove": https://translate.google.ro/?hl=ro#ro/en/ca un porumbel
Then the verse might not be well-understood.

Then what in fact do you want, and where what St. John Chrysostom says is different from what I said?
Hypostasis isn't the same thing as physis, that's what you try not to understand.
 

Ficino

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
6,759
Romania
#47
Then the verse might not be well-understood.
By whom?

Hypostasis isn't the same thing as physis, that's what you try not to understand.
I've never confused nature with hypostasis, I'm not ignorant of Christian theology, and your kind of tone and "arguments" makes me to end our discussion here.
 
Last edited:
Dec 2014
556
United States
#48
While anthropomorphism more common in primitive religions, Gods in 'higher' religions also have anthropomorphic traits. Why God needs any father ( or son )? Why Gods never act beyond human feelings and emotions? For example goddess Kali feel the wrath etc. Isn't it strange to believe in loving, caring, angry, frustrated, prideful Gods? It seems that 'Gods' are born out of human imagination.
Do you think is anthromorphism?Man: The Image of God
Man in the image of God; what does this mean in practical terms? It cannot refer to bodily, biological form since God is a Spirit and man is earthly. But while it may be true that the body does not belong to the image, since God does not have a body, yet somehow we would like to see man’s body (which is a very real part of man) included in the image. Language and creativity,—two important parts of the image, are impossible without a body. And God the Almighty agreed to share with man dominion and authority over the animal kingdom (Genesis 1:28), an activity in which the whole man, body as well as mind, is involved. Furthermore the Son of God honored the human body by becoming flesh and dwelling among men (John 1:14) (Hebrews 2:14). Lewis suggests that before the Fall, the first man, Adam mirrored Christ the man of Galilee even more nearly than Christ would have resembled his own half-brothers. If this is so, it seems almost blasphemy to consider Adam sired by a shambling ape.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,264
Brassicaland
#50
A few people above are quoting the Christian Bible for God, which is the most "familiar" image of any divinities.
Then, God of Abrahamic religions is far from the only version of divinities; we have made more divinities than God in Abrahamic religions.
Even "animal gods" of Egypt are anthropomorphic, and in the Journey to the West and a few Chinese fantasies, animal fairies or deities assume the human form.
In Buddhism, the only path to be an Arahant (note that Buddha means the first discoverer and practitioner of "the Four Holy Truths" on a planet, Arahant is the best that humans can be) is human.
Even without all the belief systems, humans are by far the most advanced and sophisticated beings on Planet Earth.
Is it natural that we conceive higher beings to be super-powered anthropomorphic beings?
 

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