Are Brahmins Jews?

tornada

Ad Honoris
Mar 2013
15,380
India
#7
Well the notion of the Deity Brahma comes from the entity of Brahman, which is more a cosmic energy than a being. And in the early Vedic conception, Brahman isn't conjugally linked to Saraswati.

So an origin in the Semitic Abraham seems unlikely IMO. Plus, while the transition from Abraham to Brahma might make sense when viewed as English lettering, it doesn't follow that it did so across the languages. Certainly we have no reason to suspect that the notion of Brahman is of non-Sanskritic or Non-Indo-European origins, as far as I know. I'm drawing on analogy for my last bit, but the pronunciations of words change over time, especially when they migrate across languages. Examples of these are how Proper Nouns like Caesar and Zeus are pronounced in modern English as opposed to how they were in Ancient Greece and Rome. I don't know how the ancient pronunciations of Abraham and Brahma line up in the ancient world. For instance, the word Ibrahim also descends from Abraham. And then there's this pronunciation of Abraham


Abraham in English and Brahma might today sound similar enough that a common origin makes sense, but it doesn't necessarily follow when you start heading into pronunciation in non-English original languages.

And given that the foundational root of the argument appears to be the similarity in names, in conjunction with privileging Judaic religious literature, the argument appears quite weak.
 
Dec 2015
2,512
USA
#8
Well the notion of the Deity Brahma comes from the entity of Brahman, which is more a cosmic energy than a being. And in the early Vedic conception, Brahman isn't conjugally linked to Saraswati.

So an origin in the Semitic Abraham seems unlikely IMO. Plus, while the transition from Abraham to Brahma might make sense when viewed as English lettering, it doesn't follow that it did so across the languages. Certainly we have no reason to suspect that the notion of Brahman is of non-Sanskritic or Non-Indo-European origins, as far as I know. I'm drawing on analogy for my last bit, but the pronunciations of words change over time, especially when they migrate across languages. Examples of these are how Proper Nouns like Caesar and Zeus are pronounced in modern English as opposed to how they were in Ancient Greece and Rome. I don't know how the ancient pronunciations of Abraham and Brahma line up in the ancient world. For instance, the word Ibrahim also descends from Abraham. And then there's this pronunciation of Abraham


Abraham in English and Brahma might today sound similar enough that a common origin makes sense, but it doesn't necessarily follow when you start heading into pronunciation in non-English original languages.

And given that the foundational root of the argument appears to be the similarity in names, in conjunction with privileging Judaic religious literature, the argument appears quite weak.
Furthermore, what kind of connection could possibly exist between early Hebrews and Vedic religion? By the time that the Hebrews had adopted monotheism or even established Israel, the doctrine of Brahma had already been settled in India. Judaism is old, but Hinduism is much, much, much older, and the idea that there's some hidden lineage shared between them just isn't possible chronologically.

Then there's the matter of geography; the fact that India and Israel are separated by thousands of miles of desert, mountain, steppe, and numerous empires, as well as doctrinal; Brahma helps explain Hinduism's polytheism by making all the gods aspects of one deity while Judaism, except for maybe for the earliest phases of the religion, is firmly monotheistic.

This all just seems like conjecture.
 
Likes: rvsakhadeo

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,298
New Delhi, India
#9
"This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (Genesis 17:5)."
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