Are Europeans less innovative than Americans since WW2?

macon

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
3,931
Slovenia, EU
#74
There can be communism with multiple available parties. I don't think that's really a modern definition of communism.

It's a much more complex thing that this.
There is no communism without political monopoly = one ruling party.

Welfare state is not same as communism in power.
 
Feb 2015
111
south Slavic guy
#75
There is no communism without political monopoly = one ruling party.

Welfare state is not same as communism in power.
The thing is that all parties seem to be aiming at the same direction nowadays. So it's not like in the past where communism was associated with only one ruling party, but nowadays we have two or more separate parties who share the same agenda.
Communism transformed into Liberalism.
The democrats in USA have pretty much a socialist agenda.
 
Oct 2013
14,291
Europix
#79
The thing is that all parties seem to be aiming at the same direction nowadays. So it's not like in the past where communism was associated with only one ruling party, but nowadays we have two or more separate parties who share the same agenda.



Communism transformed into Liberalism.



The democrats in USA have pretty much a socialist agenda.
"... All the parties aiming the same direction..."
You thinking at Donald and the Republicans and Hillary and the Democrats? Or Macron and Le Pen? Or CDU and AfD??


"... it's not like in the past where communism was associated with only one ruling party ...
Ofcourse ... there were alternatives: You could choose Bolshevik party or ...... Bolshevik party ....


" .... Communism transformed into Liberalism. .... "
Yeah, communism nowadays promotes free market, free initiative, private ownership .... so, it's Communism. Transformed in Liberalism, true, but it's Communism!


Sorry, on what planet are You living?
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,433
San Antonio, Tx
#80
You CAN make these arguments. But they seem WAAAYYY to simplistic to be taken very seriously,.

With Europe bombed to the craphouse they were not exactly starting the post war world on some sort of even playing field. Britian had some very good early computer work. But they chose to destory it all and deny it ever existsed.

Are innovators hardworking? Maybe only lazy people are really creative, hard workers just do the job they are questioning tje job.
Are innovators individualists? Maybe innovation works better in collaborative sharing environment,

The US post war boom was massive buyt the key ingredient was Brot9ioan was bankrupt almost by teh war and teh rest of Eruope teh aforementioned bombing. With teh US booming and had oddles of cash, innovative risky projects were much more likely to get funded in the USA.
I’m a little curious about this: while it is true that the US mainland escaped the ravages of war that destroyed much of Europe and a number of Pacific islands, it was mostly the US taxpayers that paid the cost of so many sunk commercial and warships. So how come the US didn’t sink into bankruptcy following the war? All those millions and billions of dollars’ worth of debt obligations of the Federal Government were, presumably, eventually paid back by an expanding domestic pos-war economy. Just so we don’t lose sight of it, this colossal WW2 war debt was ours to payback.

Nothing is ever that simple: there were hiccups along the way for sure: I recall a fairly severe “recession” in 1958 during which President Eisenhower went on radio and television to encourage us ordinary citizens to “buy, buy, buy”. Really? Out of work folks “buying” their way ot of a recession. Sounds a bit like voodoo economics to me. But eventually, we did emerge from that episode.

I agree with the historian who said that Lend-Lease and the later Marshall Plan for Europe were the most “unsordid acts”in American history. Sure, there was a selfish motivation behind both acts: Lend Lease allowed us to provision our allies without the stupendous bureaucratic headaches of accounting for every penny and getting paid on the spot. This made all the sense in the world.

Enacted later, the Marshall Plan (named after George Catlett Marshall, VMI’s most famous graduate), this incredibly generous act allowed for the reconstruction of Western Europe’s most damaged states - Great Britain, France, Holland, Belgium and others. It was even offered to the Soviets but they foolishly turned it down. It was extremely generous, but not without lots of American self-interest: it was a stipulation that the countries who were offered this aid had to buy their products for the reconstruction of Europe from American companies - scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours. Whatever, it worked. By 1956-8, Europe was mostly back and trading globally again.

It’s a depressing thought that such far-sighted acts may well be beyond the ability of some current politicians to see beyond their own narrow, personal interests.