Are Europeans less innovative than Americans since WW2?

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,207
Welsh Marches
Classic examples of enlightened self-interest, which required imagination and generosity to conceive.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
A point to keep in mind in this connection is that Europe is more culturally diverse than the USA, and one would expect to find a greater variety in the arts and literature, and a wider range of original inventiveness; this is true in the scholarly world too, the Germans and French, for instance, have scholarly tradtions in many area that diverge storngly from those in the English-speaking world (just look at philosophy for instance, but it's just as true of my own field of classical scholarship). So there is no straight 'competition' in these regards, and what we should really celebrate is diversity, and hope that it will be maintained. There is the further point that the Anglosphere of which the UK is a part (including USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand) share to some extent common cultural assumptions and inclinations that are different from those of Continental Europe, and this has important ramifications.
One may add, on a lighter note, that the intellectual 'innovations' that are doing so much to corrupt the study of the humanities in American universities are almost exclusively of European origin! And that American individualism has done very little to hinder the development of a stifling intellectual conformity in American academia.
Some really thought-provoking points here that merit further consideration.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
The British invented the computer, the World Wide Web, the jet engine, the television and the telephone.

In fact, most of the world's major inventions of the last 200 years are British.
The British did indeed invent one version of the jet engine and it worked. The Germans invented another at roughly the same time. Alan Turing could reasonably be identified as the man who invented the modern computer, or its direct predecessor. On the television “thingy”, I think there were many parents of this invention as it was being developed in a number of countries. Isn’t it correct that prior to WW2, there were opratingelevision stations in England, Germany and the US?

I thought Alexander Graham Bell was a Canadian, but I’d have to look that up again.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
The British did in fact play a leading role in the invention of the jet engine and televison, and in the early development of computing machines; and with regard to the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell was Scottish-born started his inventive career in the UK before crossing the Atlantic. One would in any case have to be a crazy Anglophobe to claim that the country where the industrial and agricultural revolutions started has been short of inventiveness, or deny that the land of Newton and Darwin has always played a leading role in scientific research. In the present age, it is second only to the USA for the number of Nobel laureates.
Well said, Linschoten!
 

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,207
Welsh Marches
Well said, Linschoten!
Our Hungarian friend seems to have an obsession for denying any British inventor credit for any invention whatever. With regard to the jet engine, I made this reply to him just now in another thread:

A classic example of how not to approach the question of priority in inventions. Guillaume patented his design [in 1921] but could take it no further because it was impractical without further development with regard to the compressors. Whittle submitted a patent in 1930 (granted in 1932) which resolved the difficulty with the compressors, to produce the first practicaldesign. Matters were not taken further in England at the time because the government was unwilling to finance them. Subsequently in 1935 Hans von Ohain developed a similar design in Germany independently, and matters were taken further in Germany because Ernst Heinkel took an interest in it, and his own engineers helpe von Ohain to develop it into a practical design. A US patent was taken out on this model in 1939, with the engineer Hahn being described I think as the inventor. The war prompted the British to come back into the field, and the Gloster Meteor was developed using Frank Whittle's engine, which was the first practical engine to be devised; and the Meteor was the first jet-engined aircraft to be used in active service. Your consistent efforts to downplay any contributions that British inventors may have made in any field are getting tiresome and irritating. If you describe Guillaume as the inventor of the jet engine because he submitted the first patent for an impractical (i.e. incomplete) design, you cannot logically deny Whittle the credit of being the inventor of the first fully practical jet engine, because he was the first to gain a patent for an engine that proved practical when it was developed. In other words, Whittle must be described by any reasonable standard as the inventor of the jet engine.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
Are you joking? LOL.

Europe is still communist. How can you have innovation with that?

America is Free.
Good Lord, get real. I’m struggling not to ask you about your age. Before calling a whole continent “communist”, it might help to know if you know what communism really is. Remedial study is indicated.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
Our Hungarian friend seems to have an obsession for denying any British inventor credit for any invention whatever. With regard to the jet engine, I made this reply to him just now in another thread:

A classic example of how not to approach the question of priority in inventions. Guillaume patented his design [in 1921] but could take it no further because it was impractical without further development with regard to the compressors. Whittle submitted a patent in 1930 (granted in 1932) which resolved the difficulty with the compressors, to produce the first practicaldesign. Matters were not taken further in England at the time because the government was unwilling to finance them. Subsequently in 1935 Hans von Ohain developed a similar design in Germany independently, and matters were taken further in Germany because Ernst Heinkel took an interest in it, and his own engineers helpe von Ohain to develop it into a practical design. A US patent was taken out on this model in 1939, with the engineer Hahn being described I think as the inventor. The war prompted the British to come back into the field, and the Gloster Meteor was developed using Frank Whittle's engine, which was the first practical engine to be devised; and the Meteor was the first jet-engined aircraft to be used in active service. Your consistent efforts to downplay any contributions that British inventors may have made in any field are getting tiresome and irritating. If you describe Guillaume as the inventor of the jet engine because he submitted the first patent for an impractical (i.e. incomplete) design, you cannot logically deny Whittle the credit of being the inventor of the first fully practical jet engine, because he was the first to gain a patent for an engine that proved practical when it was developed. In other words, Whittle must be described by any reasonable standard as the inventor of the jet engine.
I think you’re spot on.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
Nope. The British invented the World Wide Web, the computer, photography, the computer mouse, railways, the jet engine, the telephone and television. These are all well-known and well-established facts.

Another fact is that it was the British, not the Americans, who invented the plane (Percy Pilcher). The British, not the Germans, invented the car. The British invented the electric light bulb, the radio (David E. Hughes) and the guillotine.

Britain invented the modern world. Almost all of the major inventions of the last 200 years are been British.

The British invented the reflecting telescope, the seed drill, the marine chronometer, the toothbrush, motorway cats' eyes, the tin can, the lawnmower, the cardiac pacemaker, the chocolate bar, soda water, the hydraulic press, the steam engine, synthetic dye, linoleum, plastic, the microwave oven, the modern sewage system, the torpedo, the electric telegraph, the pneumatic tyre, the safety bicycle, the thermos flask, the steam turbine, disc brakes, the pneumatic tyre, the electric vacuum cleaner, the hovercraft, carbon fibre, the ATM, inoculation, the modern fire extinguisher, the collapsing baby buggy, the hip replacement, tarmac, the tractor, the postage stamp, the Christmas card, the Valentine's card, shorthand, the pencil, the atomic clock, fine porcelain, bone china, polyester, the magnifying glass, the flushing toilet, the corkscrew, the rubber band, the folding carton, the dishwasher, the lava lamp, the mini skirt, the lightswitch, the mousetrap, the electric kettle, surgical forceps, general anaesthetic, the shrapnel shell, the safety fuse, cordite, Dreadnought battleships, fighter aircraft, the tank, radar, the jump jet, the tuning fork, the concertina, the mathematical "x" (multiplication) and "=" (equals) signs, the slide rule, calculus, the weather map, football, rugby, cricket, golf, tennis, hockey, snooker, baseball, ice hockey, the modern Olympics, the Paralympics, rock climbing, table tennis, bungee jumping, darts, the seat belt, traffic lights, the diving bell, the sextant, the lifeboat, the music festival, the Boy Scouts, the circus, the jigsaw puzzle, the police, plasticine, the umbrella, the crossword puzzle and toy building bricks.
Wow! Quite impressive.
 

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,207
Welsh Marches
How can you doubt the greatness of a nation that invented the minisikirt and bungee jumping?