are poorly educated people more prone to indoctrination?

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
26,175
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#3
Critical thinking is a skill that is learned from a well-rounded education. Without critical thinking you are more susceptible to peer pressure and indoctrination. Travelling widely and experiencing a great variety of cultures and opinions is another way to protect yourself.
Yes, I tend to agree with this. I would remark that it's not the quantity of education to make the difference, but the quality. If your education is religious and you have studied in a religious school [as it still happens in some traditionalist countries] ... it's just your education to indoctrinate you ...
 
Sep 2015
1,762
England
#4
Critical thinking is a skill that is learned from a well-rounded education. Without critical thinking you are more susceptible to peer pressure and indoctrination. Travelling widely and experiencing a great variety of cultures and opinions is another way to protect yourself.
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Critical Thinking | SkillsYouNeed
 
Aug 2010
16,168
Welsh Marches
#6
Not really, people who are supposedly 'well' educated are much more liable to adopt ideologies in a consistent and wholehearted fashion, and such people are more adept in decieving themselves and ignoring the obvious, since they live more in their own thought-world and are able to reason away anything that conflicts with what they want to believe. There are in many absurd things that you need to be clever and well-read to convince yourself into believing, and very highly educated people often develop a sense of superiority that leads them to scorn the views of those whom they regard as less educated, who may in fact have more common sense and wider experience of life. Just observations (doubtless overstated) that arise from long observation of academia. That is not a world that is immune to groupthink, indeed the pressure of it are often more stifling there than I have encountered in any other environment. Extensive education is not necessarily good education, and quite a lot of university departments nowadys are more concerned to indoctrinate students with the 'right' ideas than to encourage them to think for themselves and question everything.
 

mark87

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,046
Santiago de Chile
#7
Yes and No. Yes in the sense that having a poor or nonexistent educational background can make a person prone to fall for 'cheap tricks' so to speak and fall prey to falsehoods of all sorts presented as fact which to doubt or to counter would require critical thinking skills that would be absent in an uneducated person. On the other hand an uneducated person is very pragmatic often and believes that which they see so to speak, they will be the first to turn against a nefarious regime (provided the opportunity) once their needs are not being met. An uneducated person at the same time will not be too prone to the more 'fashionable' intellectual ideas of their day which could be absolutely terrible in practice in the real world (see issues of social justice as an example, I can give a great example here).
For what it's the most recalcitrant people I know are some of the most educated people I know, college professors with Phd's, peer reviewed articles etc, and yet many are living in denial and dreamland in more ways than one. I suspect they will never change their mind on many aspects of life even if reality is right there in front of them.