Are the Phoenicians still around?

Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#41
"Lebanese is not a dialect of Arabic" pretty surprising that the vocabulary of this "Lebanese" are basically Arabic words with a few corruptions and alterations. :think:

One of the more radical advocates of this belief, Said Akl, created a "Lebanese alphabet" and published a daily newspaper and a poetry book in it. And even said something along the lines of "I'd cut my right hand and not be an Arab".
I don't speak or read Arabic but I'll take your word for it.

Ha! Fascinating. It's always struck me that many Lebanese seem to have this desire to differentiate themselves from their neighbours which is perhaps not entirely convincing (but as they say, "Fake it until you make it"...) to a foreigner coming from a continent where national identities are much more clearly defined than in the Middle East. Where do you think this drive comes from? Is it that they are largely more Christian - specifically Greek-Orthodox from what I've understood - than most other peoples in the region?


On a largely unrelated note, Taleb is a very exciting man - I should start a thread about him...
 
May 2017
1,201
Syria
#42
Ha! Fascinating. It's always struck me that many Lebanese seem to have this desire to differentiate themselves from their neighbours which is perhaps not entirely convincing (but as they say, "Fake it until you make it"...) to a foreigner coming from a continent where national identities are much more clearly defined than in the Middle East. Where do you think this drive comes from? Is it that they are largely more Christian - specifically Greek-Orthodox from what I've understood - than most other peoples in the region?
I think it's due to their complicated modern history. Difference in demographics certainly is a reason, though. I've heard some pan-Arabists and pan-Syrianists calling it an "inferiority complex" which IMHO is unfair.
 
Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#43
I think it's due to their complicated modern history. Difference in demographics certainly is a reason, though. I've heard some pan-Arabists and pan-Syrianists calling it an "inferiority complex" which IMHO is unfair.
Allright! Seems like a convincing analysis. Is pan-Arabism still a strong intellectual current in the Middle East today? I had the feeling it had mostly died. In some purely cultural, religious and ethnic sense the Arab world seems to have more in common than does India, which is a country after all....
 
May 2017
1,201
Syria
#44
Allright! Seems like a convincing analysis. Is pan-Arabism still a strong intellectual current in the Middle East today? I had the feeling it had mostly died.
It has just become irrelevant for this specific chapter in (soon-to-be) Arab history. Syria specifically learned this the hard way when its "Arab brothers" expelled Syria from the Arab league, isolated Syria diplomatically and sanctioned it, and armed militant and Islamist groups in the country.

Just to compare, in the 1970s Arabs were unified enough to launch a war on two fronts, cause an oil crisis and just in general be on the same side. In the 2010s.. they spend time in the UN just throwing not-so coveted insults at each other and falling asleep in Arab league meetings. (I'm not complaining, it's good entertainment)

The hot new intellectual "trend" in everyday people's political thought in Syria is the SSNP's pan-Syrianism.
 
Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#45
It has just become irrelevant for this specific chapter in (soon-to-be) Arab history. Syria specifically learned this the hard way when its "Arab brothers" expelled Syria from the Arab league, isolated Syria diplomatically and sanctioned it, and armed militant and Islamist groups in the country.
Right. That's more or less what I thought. What made your "brothers" do that? I know Saudi Arabia partook in it, but was there a point to it? Occasionally it feels as if it is difficult to speak of concerted foreign policy meanings behind actions in your part of the world, as everything seems so... enigmatic.

Just to compare, in the 1970s Arabs were unified enough to launch a war on two fronts, cause an oil crisis and just in general be on the same side. In the 2010s.. they spend time in the UN just throwing not-so coveted insults at each other and falling asleep in Arab league meetings. (I'm not complaining, it's good entertainment)

The hot new intellectual "trend" in everyday people's political thought in Syria is the SSNP's pan-Syrianism.
Ha! I laughed at the last part :lol:. Well, the difference certainly seems striking.

Hmmm. Interesting but strange. I have to say, coming from the outside, this seems quite artificial somehow - as if it's just nonsense and in the end nothing will change fundamentally. I knew a Persian girl once who made the claim that "the middle east has really been the same since Mesopotamia". But maybe I am being needlessly cynical.
 
Likes: JaddHaidar

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