Are there any historical biases/misconceptions that your country has?

Mar 2016
870
Australia
#1
Of course it's a bit of a generalisation to say that an entire country is biased towards or against something or has a misconception, but I'm referring to more of a general observation that could be made about your country (when I say "your" country I mean the country either you were born and live in, or you're a citizen of). This thread might be a little controversial, but from what I've seen on here most people are very calm and reasonable.

As for my own country of Australia, there's a pretty huge misconception/outright lie that many of us are taught in schools and by the media, which is that the failure of the invasion of Gallipoli in World War One was entirely because of England, and the English commanders coldly sent thousands of Australians to their pointless deaths (because we're taught that Gallipoli was made up almost entirely of Australian soldiers). The reality isn't as black and white as this, of course, and anyone that actually has a decent knowledge of WWI understands how false this massive generalisation is (both in terms of the nationalities of the soldiers at Gallipoli as well as the behavior of the British commanders).

The only reason I can think of for why our schools and media put so much excessive importance on Gallipoli (seriously, they talk about it for weeks here) is because, to be honest... Australia really doesn't have any other history worth talking about. It reflects somewhat poorly on our significant lack of history that a military disaster on the other side of the world because of a war we got dragged into is our most memorable and talked about 'moment'.

What about you guys?
 
Sep 2012
286
Argentina
#3
That most of the population of Argentina came from European immigration after 19th century.

A very big portion of the total population did come from recent migration, but not to such a huge extent.

About 50% of the population can actually trace their ancestors to the recent European migration wave. The rest is either Spanish migration from colonial times or heavily mixed Native Americans(mestizos)

50% is still a big number, but in most polls 97% of people of Argentina consider themselves European. Most take from granted that just because they have a Italian or Spanish surname they are 100% European.
 
Jun 2015
5,626
UK
#4
great britain is called this due to it being great/The Empire.

William the Conqueror introduced feudalism.

the anglo-saxons were uncivilised and barbarous until William came, and didn't contribute much (apart from the country's name, culture, major towns and cities, administration lasting to today, language, concepts of government and kingship, genetic stock....all of those small things..)
 
Jun 2015
5,626
UK
#5
great britain is called this due to it being great/The Empire.

William the Conqueror introduced feudalism.

the anglo-saxons were uncivilised and barbarous until William came, and didn't contribute much (apart from the country's name, culture, major towns and cities, administration lasting to today, language, concepts of government and kingship, genetic stock....all of those small things..)
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,603
Australia
#6
Of course it's a bit of a generalisation to say that an entire country is biased towards or against something or has a misconception, but I'm referring to more of a general observation that could be made about your country (when I say "your" country I mean the country either you were born and live in, or you're a citizen of). This thread might be a little controversial, but from what I've seen on here most people are very calm and reasonable.

As for my own country of Australia, there's a pretty huge misconception/outright lie that many of us are taught in schools and by the media, which is that the failure of the invasion of Gallipoli in World War One was entirely because of England, and the English commanders coldly sent thousands of Australians to their pointless deaths (because we're taught that Gallipoli was made up almost entirely of Australian soldiers). The reality isn't as black and white as this, of course, and anyone that actually has a decent knowledge of WWI understands how false this massive generalisation is (both in terms of the nationalities of the soldiers at Gallipoli as well as the behavior of the British commanders).

The only reason I can think of for why our schools and media put so much excessive importance on Gallipoli (seriously, they talk about it for weeks here) is because, to be honest... Australia really doesn't have any other history worth talking about. It reflects somewhat poorly on our significant lack of history that a military disaster on the other side of the world because of a war we got dragged into is our most memorable and talked about 'moment'.

What about you guys?
While I agree that the entire Gallipoli thing has been blown out of all proportion and rather unfairly blames the British for every military misfortune suffered by Australians on the peninsula (although it was the idea of the British in the first place) I disagree with your assertion that Australia has no history worth talking about. If you take even a cursory look beyond the 'history' espoused in the Australian media or school curricular you will find a fascinating story that is as interesting as any other.
 

Shtajerc

Ad Honorem
Jul 2014
6,468
Lower Styria, Slovenia
#7
Since the time of Yugoslavia, they try hard to make us lose what's left of our national pride, making us believe we were German slaves for a 1000 years, that we have a poor history as a nation and ethnicity, that we were humble and didn't produce any important soldiers, that our nation is a construct of 19th century literates, that we are a natiin of peasents, who had no own nobility whatsoever. For some to me unknown reason the line "serfs - born to be serfs, raised to be serfs" from a certain 100 years old novel was repeated over and over by the commies, so long that the people finally bought it. Our history is rich and diverse and there are enough sources to disprove any of the above claims, yet noone likes to talk about it, and our schools aren't doing anything to improve it. I'm not talking about nationalism here, but there's hardly another nation that's downplaying itself to such an extent like we do.
 
Mar 2012
3,474
Redneck Country, AKA Texas
#9
That most of the population of Argentina came from European immigration after 19th century.

A very big portion of the total population did come from recent migration, but not to such a huge extent.

About 50% of the population can actually trace their ancestors to the recent European migration wave. The rest is either Spanish migration from colonial times or heavily mixed Native Americans(mestizos)

50% is still a big number, but in most polls 97% of people of Argentina consider themselves European. Most take from granted that just because they have a Italian or Spanish surname they are 100% European.
So that explains the whole "Argentina is white" thing.

As for America, an alarmingly large percentage of our population thinks we were the main reason the Allies won WWII (that would be the Soviets).
 
#10
I'm not sure how accurate this is now, but definitely in the 20th century, most Americans thought either Christopher Columbus discovered the world was round, or that he was a saintly hero and didn't do any massacring of natives.


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