Areas which remained Hindu strongholds during Buddhist-Jain peak periods

greatstreetwarrior

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
3,894
Which areas in India specifically remained citadels of Hinduism even during the Buddhist-Jain peak periods (from the time of their inception to the emergence of the Guptas). How did these areas remain strongly adhering to Hinduism? What kept them insulated? I ask this because when I read the history of the time what stands out is that both these faiths spread far and wide in the subcontinent. So I wonder if there were any places they could not penetrate due to strong Hindu presence?
 
Nov 2014
1,979
Bhuloka
Which areas in India specifically remained citadels of Hinduism even during the Buddhist-Jain peak periods (from the time of their inception to the emergence of the Guptas). How did these areas remain strongly adhering to Hinduism? What kept them insulated? I ask this because when I read the history of the time what stands out is that both these faiths spread far and wide in the subcontinent. So I wonder if there were any places they could not penetrate due to strong Hindu presence?
Define Buddhist-Jain peak periods!
 

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,627
China
i believe in India, Buddhism never reached such a level that other religions had to keep a state as "remaining".
perhaps Brahmanism was always the dominant religion.(not completely identical to Hinduism, i think)
Buddhism had been a religion relying on government supporting. it had been too focus on documents and academic debating, instead of the spirit need of the people. it didn't successfully change this condition in India.
 

Jinit

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
5,274
India
Which areas in India specifically remained citadels of Hinduism even during the Buddhist-Jain peak periods (from the time of their inception to the emergence of the Guptas). How did these areas remain strongly adhering to Hinduism? What kept them insulated? I ask this because when I read the history of the time what stands out is that both these faiths spread far and wide in the subcontinent. So I wonder if there were any places they could not penetrate due to strong Hindu presence?
To begin with why do you think that time period which gave the Epic and Puranic literature and canonical literature like Smritis and Shastras which forms the basic core of Hinduism and almost redefined the religion, was some kind of low point for Hinduism?
 

greatstreetwarrior

Ad Honorem
Nov 2012
3,894
To begin with why do you think that time period which gave the Epic and Puranic literature and canonical literature like Smritis and Shastras which forms the basic core of Hinduism and almost redefined the religion, was some kind of low point for Hinduism?
not low point of Hinduism. But high point of Jain and Buddhism. That is what I mention. So you got my context wrong.
 

Jinit

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
5,274
India
not low point of Hinduism. But high point of Jain and Buddhism. That is what I mention. So you got my context wrong.
Well the phrase like "the areas that remained Hindu strongholds" kind a gives sense that Hinduism was under some sort of siege losing to heterodox faiths which isn't completely accurate. However all the same it is also true that the elite groups of Brahmins who were mainly dependent on royal patronage must have felt threatened by the steadily rising influence of Buddhism not mainly among laity but rather among rulers themselves. In that sense the areas that remained Hindu strongholds were probably Magadha and central India (Ujjaiyni) under Sunga rule and Deccan under Satavahana rule both whom commissioned Brahminical rituals like Ashwamedha. In addition Yuga Purana which narrates Indo Greek invasion in future tense also mentions in rather prophesying tone something to the effect that people will prosper and find safe heaven in south (Deccan) during their invasion.

It is also however wrong to say that it was high point of Buddhism and Jainism. The high point of Shwetamber Jainism in western India was during the medieval period under the Rajput rulers of Gujarat and Rajasthan. Digmabar Jainism was heavily patronized by dynasties of Deccan such as Kadambas and Rashtrakutas, again during the medieval period. Buddhism flourished greatly in Bengal and Bihar under the Pala rule. Similarly rock cut temples of Ajanta were commissioned during Vakataka rule and so on. For the time period that you are suggesting Buddhism was at its height only in north west India and probably in Magadha. And Jainism probably under the Nanda dynasty and Kharavela of Mahameghavahana dynasty Odisa.