Aren't some countries unfairly vilified for their slavery/colonial past?

mark87

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,076
Santiago de Chile
Again you're missing the point, by declaring that "Left" means "Soviet"! Many say the Truman Doctrine is what destroyed the USSR, and Truman was a liberal Democrat.

The left, which right now in the USA means progressive democrats, are indeed smarter and more correct than the right, which are ultra-conservative corporate-sycophant Republicans who obviously, if you're paying attention, care nothing for democracy, the people, justice, etc.

And the countries who "survived" the Cold War, let's just speak of the EU nations... they're all demosocialist today! Obviously today's Europeans are smarter than today's Yanks, I'd say.
There is no such thing as 'demosocialist'. The EU nations (barring obviously the Eastern and central European ones for obvious socialist reasons) are not socialist nor were they during the cold war, there is the right to property in those nations, the Scandinavian countries often used as the poster child for the welfare state were in NATO not the Warsaw pact, they were and are capitalist mixed economies, they are not socialist they are Social Democracies.
 
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Cepheus

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,309
There is a "racial" component in many of the posts here along with the concept of "guilt."

What is the history of slavery in regard to race ? Has there always been a "racial" component in regard to slavery ?

IOW, would Romans of Imperial Rome have viewed the "institution" or their "system" of slavery as "racial" ?

Would the Romans have understood any concept of "guilt" with the concept of slavery ?
 

Cepheus

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,309
Slavery is an ancient institution that exists probably since the beginning of times and Portugal engaged in slave trading since the kingdom was born.
But has it always had "racial" overtones ?

If not, is there a point in history where "racial" elements begin to dominate the concept of slavery ?
 
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Aug 2018
274
America
IOW, would Romans of Imperial Rome have viewed the "institution" or their "system" of slavery as "racial" ?
The Romans did not have a "racial" view of slavery, and they were at best what some scholars call "proto-racist", and they were as racist with Europeans as they were with Asians and Africans. In fact, you find far worse insults against Celts and Germanics who were as light skinned (if not more) as the Romans than any other people the Romans face. They also enslaved Celts and Germanics at an arguably greater percentage than other peoples. The Third Servile War under Spartacus, the biggest slave rebellion, had a strong Celtic component (and apparently many slaves were also Germanics taken from the Teutonic invasion defeated by Sulla and Marius) and was led by a Thracian.

Meanwhile, in medieval Europe at least, Africans were far more likely to be seen as invading Muslims who posed a military threat to Europe than as slaves, or as faraway Christian emperors as was the case with the legend of Prester John. The ones who were the stereotypical Slaves were the Slavs, to such an extent that the term "slave" comes from the name Slav.
 

Cepheus

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,309
The USA still has issues stemming from slavery, and the South still is poorer than the North (and far West in modern times).

But then countries like Spain don't get the same moral judgment. Spain, and Portugal, started European colonialism and the slave trade, and there aren't as big movements or moral outrage at bad past actions.

Why don't anti-racists target them, as much as they do Britain or America?
Is the outrage against slavery or racism, or slavery and racism ?
 

Cepheus

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,309
The Romans did not have a "racial" view of slavery, and they were at best what some scholars call "proto-racist", and they were as racist with Europeans as they were with Asians and Africans. In fact, you find far worse insults against Celts and Germanics who were as light skinned (if not more) as the Romans than any other people the Romans face. They also enslaved Celts and Germanics at an arguably greater percentage than other peoples. The Third Servile War under Spartacus, the biggest slave rebellion, had a strong Celtic component (and apparently many slaves were also Germanics taken from the Teutonic invasion defeated by Sulla and Marius) and was led by a Thracian.

Meanwhile, in medieval Europe at least, Africans were far more likely to be seen as invading Muslims who posed a military threat to Europe than as slaves, or as faraway Christian emperors as was the case with the legend of Prester John. The ones who were the stereotypical Slaves were the Slavs, to such an extent that the term "slave" comes from the name Slav.
So, somewhere along the timeline we had a "racial" component enter into the concept of slavery. Would this be a correct statement ?

What was this component ? How did this component manifest itself ?

In respect to the OP, could we link this component to colonialism ?

Was there a switch in the way people viewed slavery during European colonial expansion ?

Can we localize this to a particular time frame or era ?
 
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