Aren't some countries unfairly vilified for their slavery/colonial past?

Peter Graham

Ad Honorem
Jan 2014
2,619
Westmorland
In the UK it is the left that has been the pre-eminent voice of radicalism and all things "PC" in academia and local government for many decades.
This is not correct. Political correctness is just a term used by social conservatives (note the small 'c') to denigrate or mock any changes which they don't like. Those changes take various forms but are especially easily observed in the UK's growing corpus of anti-discrimination legislation. This has developed slowly since the late 60s/early 70s and has been actively promoted by political parties of all colours. Indeed, one of the most significant pieces of legislation that was designed to protect the rights of those accused of crimes (the Police and Criminal Evidence Act) was the brainchild or Margaret Thatcher's Tories. And I don't suppose there are many who'd rush to call her a leftie...

There are many people who are less strident than Corvidius but don't feel that promoting equal pay for women or seeking to deal with entrenched racism is in any way an expression of radicalism.

But when I say "left", I don't mean those who are of, or for the Labour Party, but the hardline trots and fellow travellers. In fact for me the terms "left" and "right" are redundant, .
Hardline Trots are, thankfully, pretty rare in the UK. The rise of Momentum (a Labour party lobby group) has given the hard left a bit of a fillip, but as history shows us, Trots are not the people to go to if you care much about human rights. In fact, Trots like to see themselves as the big champions of the oppressed masses, which gives them an agenda diametrically opposed to the one that Corvidius would assign them.

and we have something else, something not fully formed yet, but the Brexit farce is bringing it all into focus
Indeed we do - it's called populism. And once again, our history leaves us in no doubt about what happens when we listen to strong men who tell us what we (or some of us, at least) want to hear in order to subvert the rule of law for their own ends.

In the UK nobody dares to address any issues alluding to "whites" being victims in any way shape or form, as that gets them labelled as racist. Genuine free speech on these issues, and others, has gone, and in that the UK is very different to the USA.
This isn't true either. Free speech is alive and well in the UK, as the anti-EU lobby showed yesterday when they plumbed new depths by posting a picture of the German Chancellor with the charming legend which went something like 'we didn't win two World Wars to be kicked around by a Kraut'. Makes one proud to be British. Not.
 

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,020
Lorraine tudesque
That's all nice and well. But when the Isis Caliphate is selling non- muslim woman on markets. Do they have racial theories ass well?
 

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
3,047
Crows nest
This isn't true either. Free speech is alive and well in the UK, as the anti-EU lobby showed yesterday when they plumbed new depths by posting a picture of the German Chancellor with the charming legend which went something like 'we didn't win two World Wars to be kicked around by a Kraut'. Makes one proud to be British. Not.
I'm not going to bother dealing with that part of your post I have not quoted, except to say it is all wrong.

As for free speech in the UK, perhaps you could explain this to the doctor who got sacked on the spot for daring to tell his manager that he would not address a notional six ft tall bearded man as "madam" if they "identified" as female. Christian doctor 'sacked' for refusing 'to call any 6ft bearded man madam'

In his case he cited his own religious beliefs in his defence, but actually that is irrelevant as I as a non believer have exactly the same view.

Your example of "free speech" was risible. Nobody is going to complain about use of the term "Kraut", no matter what the context or how rude it is. On the other hand, a reference, in different circumstances of course, to "rag-heads" would in the first instance never be used by the press in the UK, and if used publicly by members of the public would get them arrested for "hate crime", and you know it.
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,877
Portugal
I'm not going to bother dealing with that part of your post I have not quoted, except to say it is all wrong.

As for free speech in the UK, perhaps you could explain this to the doctor who got sacked on the spot for daring to tell his manager that he would not address a notional six ft tall bearded man as "madam" if they "identified" as female. Christian doctor 'sacked' for refusing 'to call any 6ft bearded man madam'

In his case he cited his own religious beliefs in his defence, but actually that is irrelevant as I as a non believer have exactly the same view.
See this: Trans pronouns row doctor 'was not suspended'

But this is off-topic!!!!