Article on treatment of Female Collaborators after D-Day

May 2017
183
Virginia
#1
I am interested in hearing your opinions on this article. I've heard of this happening after D-Day, but I don't much about it in depth. To be honest, it sounds a little inflammatory based on what I do know, but I'd appreciate it if someone could provide more information on the extent of collaboration and punishment of collaborators in France.


"They called it the épuration sauvage, the wild purge, because it was spontaneous and unofficial. But, yes, it was savage, too. In the weeks and months following the D-Day landings of June 6,1944, Allied troops and the resistance swept across France liberating towns and villages, and unleashing a flood of collective euphoria, relief and hope. And then the punishments began."

The article itself: What Happened to Women in France After D-Day in 1944 | Time
 
Feb 2017
2
United States
#3
The article highlights an often-forgotten product of the effects of the German occupation in France and the air of suspicion that was pervasive during and after it. Petty grudges and personal rivalries were unfortunate motivators for these acts of retribution. And like the article briefly notes, these people were hardly clean themselves. The myth of a unified French "Resistance" belies the fact that some were forced to be pragmatists first, and partisans later.

The attempt to connect it to #MeToo seemed forced and out-of-context, but otherwise, it is a good piece to highlight the ruthless nature of the subject.
 
Jul 2007
1,658
Australia
#4
You might also refer to this story:

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2009/jun/05/women-victims-d-day-landings-second-world-war

"The basically misogynistic reaction of head-shaving during the liberation of France was repeated in Belgium, Italy and Norway and, to a lesser extent, in the Netherlands. In France, another wave of head-shaving took place in the late spring of 1945 when forced labourers, prisoners of war and concentration camp victims returned from Germany. Revenge on women represented a form of expiation for the frustrations and sense of impotence among males humiliated by their country's occupation. One could almost say that it was the equivalent of rape by the victor."
 
Nov 2015
1,747
Bye, bye
#5
It's been something despicable.
There were absolutely monstrous cases.
EDIT:
I completely agree with the sources posted by @Melisende and @ThatGuy.
These sources say things right and the passage quoted by @Melisende is relevant.
These sad acts are quite well documented by the French historical literature even if this theme was really poppularized from the years 1980-1990.
They are considered in the collective memory as crimes committed by cowards who were "resistants" of circumstances and of the last hour.
 
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redcoat

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,668
Stockport Cheshire UK
#6
Whatever your views on the connections the writer makes to modern feminist movements the actual historical accuracy of the article cannot be disputed.
 
May 2011
13,786
Navan, Ireland
#8
'Resistance' against the occupation and 'collaboration' are sensitive subjects-- after the war of course there are few supporters of Vichy etc and De Gaulle was uniformly popular.

As one gentleman once told me "If everyone who claimed to be in the 'Resistance' was and did what they claimed France would have been liberated within the week" -- a bit of an exaggeration but I took the point.

Most people were not in the Resistance or actively collaborated but simply tried to live their lives ,often by chance, they came into contact with one side or the other.

After the war people have to prove their 'credentials' and obvious losers are the target it happened before look at the treatment of loyalists after the ARW or the Irish War of Independence.
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,603
Australia
#9
'Resistance' against the occupation and 'collaboration' are sensitive subjects-- after the war of course there are few supporters of Vichy etc and De Gaulle was uniformly popular.

As one gentleman once told me "If everyone who claimed to be in the 'Resistance' was and did what they claimed France would have been liberated within the week" -- a bit of an exaggeration but I took the point.

Most people were not in the Resistance or actively collaborated but simply tried to live their lives ,often by chance, they came into contact with one side or the other.

After the war people have to prove their 'credentials' and obvious losers are the target it happened before look at the treatment of loyalists after the ARW or the Irish War of Independence.

I have read somewhere (source escapes me at the moment) that only around 2 % of citizens in occupied countries were active members of the resistance during WWII. There was an additional percentage who provided support, a small number of active collaborators and the majority who would keep their heads down and try to live their lives as normally as possible.



These Resistance numbers swelled as the Allied began their march across Europe and the defeat of Germany looked more certain, and lots of wannabes were establishing their patriotic credentials after the danger had passed. This led to the excesses these women and other alleged collaborators suffered.
 
Feb 2016
5,049
Atlantic Ocean
#10
I have read somewhere (source escapes me at the moment) that only around 2 % of citizens in occupied countries were active members of the resistance during WWII. There was an additional percentage who provided support, a small number of active collaborators and the majority who would keep their heads down and try to live their lives as normally as possible.



These Resistance numbers swelled as the Allied began their march across Europe and the defeat of Germany looked more certain, and lots of wannabes were establishing their patriotic credentials after the danger had passed. This led to the excesses these women and other alleged collaborators suffered.
Thats about the sum off it. it was not the fellas hiding in the forests with the SOE doing this, it was last minute heroes armed with Scissors showing how tough they are
 

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