Assyrian race

Aug 2018
5
sweden
#1
Alot of kurds spaminf forums and youtube claiming they are the forefathers to europeans and the oldest people in middle east. That they are the true mesopotamians.

Assyrians can´t be caucasians like the kurds. Martin Luther King used to call the Assyrians for negroid race. I think the Assyrians came from Ethiophia/Eritra to middle east and mixed up whit the Sumerian. No one knows the Sumerian race. The Assyrian and kurds can not be the same, the Assyrians is a mixed race whit sumerian probably negroid. What do you guys think about it.

I even learned the migrations started from middle east to europe and not the otherway, but this kurdish pro history teachers say the came from europe to middle east 8 000 years ago.

Is it true that kurds are medes and are the true mesoptoamians ?

Kind regards
 
Jul 2017
842
Crete
#2
Negroid are the indigenous peoples of central and southern Africa
were-as Assyrians, are kin with Persians, Hittites and Babylonians.


Sunni Muslims defacing Assyrian statues, RIP Assyrian history.
 
Apr 2017
710
U.S.A.
#3
The assyrians were a middle-eastern people, they weren't "negroid." The origins of the kurds is uncertain but they probably arrived in the middle-east around the same time as the Persians, they certainly weren't the ancestors of the Europeans. There is no "Mesopotamian" race, it is a geographic area that many different peoples have inhabited. The Sumerian language is unrelated to any to others, they weren't an unknown people, just unique. They looked similar to other middle-eastern peoples.
 
Likes: bedb
May 2017
1,177
Syria
#5
Kurds aren't the Medes, aren't the oldest middle eastern peoples nor are they the true "Mesopotamians". The first claim can't be proved, as for them being Medes there is a significant time gap between the heydey of the Medes and the first mention of the Kurds, and as for the third claim.. there aren't any true "Mesopotamians" and the Kurds themselves are heterogeneous.

Those claims among others are probably just to gain a sense of superiority or national pride. Ofttimes the exaltation of a "glorious past" or "great forefathers" is used as a coping mechanism in the face of a not-so-pretty present (maybe like some Lebanese claiming they are Phoenicians).

Sunni Muslims defacing Assyrian statues, RIP Assyrian history.
Those are terrorists. They aren't representatives of any Muslims nor any sect of them.
 
Likes: bedb

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,151
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
#6
Historum does not look kindly on discussions that express nationalistic agendas. Consider this a warning. Post carefully or risk closing of the thread.
 
Mar 2017
802
Colorado
#7
I was surprised, from other threads, that there is a move by some ethnicities to identify themselves with Phoenicians. The idea seems to be that establishing some legacy to an identifiable ancient culture legitimizes ... something.

Is there a group identifying themselves as Assyrians? It seemed the original post claimed the Turks were claiming to be "vague" Mesopotamians.
 
Aug 2018
5
sweden
#9
I was surprised, from other threads, that there is a move by some ethnicities to identify themselves with Phoenicians. The idea seems to be that establishing some legacy to an identifiable ancient culture legitimizes ... something.

Is there a group identifying themselves as Assyrians? It seemed the original post claimed the Turks were claiming to be "vague" Mesopotamians.
I belong to Syriac community and some of our people identify themselv as Assyrian and some as Aramean. Then you got the eastern Assyrians from Iraq.
We Syriac´s live in Turkey, Anatolia. Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, Palenstine. Eastern Assyrians mostley in Iraq, Iran and some in Syria.
 
Mar 2017
802
Colorado
#10
I belong to Syriac community and some of our people identify themselv as Assyrian and some as Aramean. Then you got the eastern Assyrians from Iraq.
We Syriac´s live in Turkey, Anatolia. Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, Palenstine. Eastern Assyrians mostley in Iraq, Iran and some in Syria.
I worked with a Chaldean for a couple of years. He would be a Syriac, but not an Assyrian? He was from Mosul (but pronounced it Moo-sel).
 

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