Australia Discovery

LatinoEuropa

Ad Honorem
Oct 2015
5,222
Matosinhos Portugal
The official responsible for the discovery of Australia by Northern Europeans was Captain James Cook [1], which claimed the vast continent to the UK crown on August 21, 1770 and called it New South Wales [1]. However, and not counting the Aboriginal colonization verified for about 40,000 years, the voyage of Captain Cook was only the culmination of several exploratory expeditions to the South Seas in search of the mythical southern continent. In these trips, Australia would have been visited according to some researchers, by Portuguese navigators (in 1522, by Christopher de Mendonca and in 1525 by Gomes de Sequeira), and certain of the Netherlands visits to various parts of the Australian coast from the seventeenth century.
The first European contact with the mainland South would have been done by Portuguese navigators, although there are no references to this trip or travel in the historical archives of Portugal. The main evidence for these undeclared visits was the discovery of two Portuguese cannon sunk off the Broome Bay on the northwest coast of Australia. The typology of these artillery pieces indicates they are of Portuguese manufacture and can be dated between the years 1475 and 1525.
The Australian historian Peter Trickett states [2] that two Portuguese expeditions in Indonesia's seas in the first quarter of the sixteenth century would have reached the Australian territory: Mendonça Christopher of the expedition from Malacca to the south in search of the "golden islands "(1522), but especially the Gomes de Sequeira (1525) which allegedly hit the peninsula York. To reinforce this thesis conjures up the establishment by the Portuguese in 1516 a trading post in Timor, which is about 500 kilometers from Australia.
According to historian and philologist Carl von Brandenstein, the Portuguese would have sunk in the northwest of Western Australia, near the island of Depuch, between 1511 and 1520, and was the first European to play Australia, where they could not leave. These Portuguese would eventually integrate with the local population, leaving cultural brands assimilated by the aborigines. The basis of his theories is the analysis of the languages ​​of Ngarluma Karriera and ethnic groups (tribes of Western Australia), which have special features that are not detected in other aboriginal languages, such as the use of the passive voice. von Brandenstein also presents a list of words of these languages ​​who claims to have a Portuguese origin (examples: turtle thartaruga, mounts / lot blanket, ceiling Thatta) [3].
A series of maps known as Dieppe maps, produced by a mapping school in the French city of the same name between 1536 and 1566, and which reveal a Portuguese influence, portray a land called Jave La Grande that features a coast setting that reminds Australian west coast, in some cases representing vegetables and ethnographic forms. Some scholars reject a connection with representations of maps of Australia, arguing that plant and human forms are typical of the Indonesian islands or would be mere legendary representations.
It can also be noted a Dutch map of the seventeenth century representing a coral reef with the name of Abreolhos. This word is a derivation of Portuguese expression eyes open, which was often used to indicate danger zones in Lusitanian charts (expression still popularly used to describe any painful accident, used to teach be careful).
For supporters of the Portuguese priority thesis, the Lusitanian browsers not claimed the continent for the crown of Portugal and maintained apparently discovered in silence. The reasons for the secrecy of any such initiative would be related to the Treaty of Tordesillas, which determined that the area of ​​Australia would, when discovered, property of the Spanish crown. To thicken the mystery, any records and maple notes these expeditions must have disappeared in the destruction of Lisbon Earthquake of 1755.
With the death of Cardinal-King Henrique in 1580, and with the formation of the personal union between the Portuguese and Spanish crowns, Portugal never resumed exploration initiatives in this part of the world. The lack of written documents on these expeditions makes the Portuguese presence in the Australian coast is challenged by many historians.
Richard Henry Major argues that the Portuguese were in the Australian coast in 1601 also through browser expedition Manuel Godinho de Eredia, under orders of the Viceroy of India Ayres de Saldanha. It offers as proof a map copy that found itself in the British Museum which displays the following inscription: "Nape Antara was discovered in the year 1601, by Manuel Godinho de Eredia, by order of the Viceroy Ayres de Saldanha." Antara neck refers to a region of the coast of Australia, which was supposed to have been discovered only in 1616 the Dutch
 

notgivenaway

Ad Honorem
Jun 2015
5,780
UK
Cook wasn't the first European to go there.

Abel Tasman did, he was Dutch.

Capt. Cook only led to the first major European settlement of the continent.

To say Capt. Cook was the first European to note the land or set foot on it is silly to say the least, and nobody can take that seriously.
 

LatinoEuropa

Ad Honorem
Oct 2015
5,222
Matosinhos Portugal
Yes my friend the discovery of Australia reminds me of Christopher Columbus some say is Genoese others say it is Spanish others say it is Português.Afinal is like the old saying each one pulls his biggest coal for its sardines. Anyway the story is more val live in ignorance embrace friend
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,757
Australia
No one in Australia - at least no one who has attended school - is unaware of the pre-Cook European exploration of Australia.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,382
T'Republic of Yorkshire
The official responsible for the discovery of Australia by Northern Europeans was Captain James Cook [1], which claimed the vast continent to the UK crown on August 21, 1770 and called it New South Wales [1]. However, and not counting the Aboriginal colonization verified for about 40,000 years, the voyage of Captain Cook was only the culmination of several exploratory expeditions to the South Seas in search of the mythical southern continent. In these trips, Australia would have been visited according to some researchers, by Portuguese navigators (in 1522, by Christopher de Mendonca and in 1525 by Gomes de Sequeira), and certain of the Netherlands visits to various parts of the Australian coast from the seventeenth century.
The first European contact with the mainland South would have been done by Portuguese navigators, although there are no references to this trip or travel in the historical archives of Portugal. The main evidence for these undeclared visits was the discovery of two Portuguese cannon sunk off the Broome Bay on the northwest coast of Australia. The typology of these artillery pieces indicates they are of Portuguese manufacture and can be dated between the years 1475 and 1525.
The Australian historian Peter Trickett states [2] that two Portuguese expeditions in Indonesia's seas in the first quarter of the sixteenth century would have reached the Australian territory: Mendonça Christopher of the expedition from Malacca to the south in search of the "golden islands "(1522), but especially the Gomes de Sequeira (1525) which allegedly hit the peninsula York. To reinforce this thesis conjures up the establishment by the Portuguese in 1516 a trading post in Timor, which is about 500 kilometers from Australia.
According to historian and philologist Carl von Brandenstein, the Portuguese would have sunk in the northwest of Western Australia, near the island of Depuch, between 1511 and 1520, and was the first European to play Australia, where they could not leave. These Portuguese would eventually integrate with the local population, leaving cultural brands assimilated by the aborigines. The basis of his theories is the analysis of the languages ​​of Ngarluma Karriera and ethnic groups (tribes of Western Australia), which have special features that are not detected in other aboriginal languages, such as the use of the passive voice. von Brandenstein also presents a list of words of these languages ​​who claims to have a Portuguese origin (examples: turtle thartaruga, mounts / lot blanket, ceiling Thatta) [3].
A series of maps known as Dieppe maps, produced by a mapping school in the French city of the same name between 1536 and 1566, and which reveal a Portuguese influence, portray a land called Jave La Grande that features a coast setting that reminds Australian west coast, in some cases representing vegetables and ethnographic forms. Some scholars reject a connection with representations of maps of Australia, arguing that plant and human forms are typical of the Indonesian islands or would be mere legendary representations.
It can also be noted a Dutch map of the seventeenth century representing a coral reef with the name of Abreolhos. This word is a derivation of Portuguese expression eyes open, which was often used to indicate danger zones in Lusitanian charts (expression still popularly used to describe any painful accident, used to teach be careful).
For supporters of the Portuguese priority thesis, the Lusitanian browsers not claimed the continent for the crown of Portugal and maintained apparently discovered in silence. The reasons for the secrecy of any such initiative would be related to the Treaty of Tordesillas, which determined that the area of ​​Australia would, when discovered, property of the Spanish crown. To thicken the mystery, any records and maple notes these expeditions must have disappeared in the destruction of Lisbon Earthquake of 1755.
With the death of Cardinal-King Henrique in 1580, and with the formation of the personal union between the Portuguese and Spanish crowns, Portugal never resumed exploration initiatives in this part of the world. The lack of written documents on these expeditions makes the Portuguese presence in the Australian coast is challenged by many historians.
Richard Henry Major argues that the Portuguese were in the Australian coast in 1601 also through browser expedition Manuel Godinho de Eredia, under orders of the Viceroy of India Ayres de Saldanha. It offers as proof a map copy that found itself in the British Museum which displays the following inscription: "Nape Antara was discovered in the year 1601, by Manuel Godinho de Eredia, by order of the Viceroy Ayres de Saldanha." Antara neck refers to a region of the coast of Australia, which was supposed to have been discovered only in 1616 the Dutch
This appears to be a copy/paste from the Wikipedia article.

Please do not reproduce large tracts of material here from other websites, especially without citing the original page. You can link to the article and post your points of discussion.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,382
T'Republic of Yorkshire
No one in Australia - at least no one who has attended school - is unaware of the pre-Cook European exploration of Australia.
I could never remember which of his three voyages he was killed on.
 

LatinoEuropa

Ad Honorem
Oct 2015
5,222
Matosinhos Portugal
good night friend Naomasa 298. I make you this question the friend knows all of hitória of their country and also knows all about European history, the friend as you know my country Portugal has a very rich hitória Universal level, because the friend already is not the first to draw attention me, as atraz said my country has a rich history and I like Portuguese tell you not all the history of my country know the color, and to be able to give something to the rich history forum to do my google search on the history of my country because I do not know any color of history and seen salteada.Pelos gives me to understand that I'm a persona non grata in this beautiful forum História.Concluindo and summarizing tell you before you call me again attention on my posts, it's best to delete my account, because I've seen I've been here incomandar many people will be because I am Portuguese to bother some people in some European countries it is please erase my account I already feel the most in your forum.Adeus
 

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,725
Spain
Well, I can see here nobody cited the Spanish discoverer Luis Vaz de Torres, probably the first european to be in Australia (and took possesion for Spain) in 1606. Torres was in the North of Australia, between Cape York and Prince of Wale Island (modern names of course, Torre didn´t name so).

Till the famous hispanophoba English Wikipeida say the name Australia came from the name give by the Spaniards (Not Terra Australis) but Austrailia.. in honor of the House of Austria, the royal family ruled Spain in early XVII Century. Casa de Austria (House of Austria) instead of Habsburg.

The First Discovery of Australia and New Guinea

To say Dutchmen arrived to Australia before Spaniards.. it is not truth.

Torres in Australia (York Peninsula)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lu%C3%ADs_Vaz_de_Torres#The_south_coast_of_New_Guinea_and_Torres_Strait

I know that somebody here prefer to say Dutchmen arrived to Australia and Oceania before Spaniards did... but it is not... I know people prefer because Dutchmen are Protestants and Spaniards are Catholic.. but not... the history is history.. and Australia was name Australia by the Spanish Catholics not by Dutch Protestans, and who arrived to York in 1606 weren´t from Netherlands but from Spain...
History is history.

New Holland... about 100 years later than Austrailia was named by Torres:



For sure, somebody will say the "vikings" arrived to Australia before Spaniards...