Before the advent of Zionism and Arab nationalism, Jews and Palestinians lived in pea

Dec 2015
3,522
USA
#1
I felt this article offered an interesting insight into the history of Israel/Palestine...I perhaps disagree with some of the points but found it to be a worthy read,

Before the advent of Zionism and Arab nationalism, Jews and Palestinians lived in peace in the holy land.
....
As the Ottoman Empire, which ruled Palestine at the time, began losing its power toward the end of the 19th century, a new, local identity began developing out of the lived experiences of Jews and Arabs. This identity, which took precedence over religion, was shared by Muslims, Jews, and Christians.

Following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire during the First World War, both the Zionist movement and the Palestinian national movement began trying to take control of that identity and define the people of the land as either Jewish Zionists or Palestinian Arabs. There were those who called for unity, such as Jerusalem Mayor Raghib al-Nashashibi, who wanted not to speak of Arabs and Jews, but of Palestinians. Klein debunks the myth according to which the residents of the country before the advent Zionism or the Arab national movement lacked all identity. Instead, he describes a lively and vivacious community with its own traditions and customs, bringing testimonies from Jews, Muslims and foreigners as proof.

Both Zionism and Arab nationalism came to Palestine from outside the country. The two movements developed in the diaspora but both saw the territory between the river and the sea as part of their war for control; they drew borders in a place that had been borderless at the expense of those who lived here. Palestinian residents distinguished between “Arab Jews” — a common identity of Jews who were either born here or in other Arab countries — and Jewish immigrants from Europe who arrived to redefine the land. Klein quotes several journal entries penned by Palestinians at the beginning of the 20th century, according to which non-Ashkenazi Jews were seen as awlad al-balad (“sons of the land”) and yahud awlad al-arab (“Jewish Arabs”).


more,

https://972mag.com/before-zionism-the-shared-life-of-jews-and-palestinians/118408/
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,936
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#3
"Both Zionism and Arab nationalism came to Palestine from outside the country"

Ehm ... this is at least anti historical ... there was no Palestine as a "country", it was a province created by this or that dominating power [Romans, Eastern Romans, Muslims, Ottomans, Brits ... even UN has invented a Palestine ...].
 
May 2017
22
kaam se kaam rakho Gandu
#4
it's like saying Hindus and Muslims were living in peace and communal harmony Before British Arrived... No sir, you are completely wrong. dont fall for modern propaganda.

This is what Prophet Muhammad did to those Jews who foguth against him.

After the Battle of the Trench in 627, the Jews of Banu Qurayza were accused of conspiring with the Meccans. Though Qurayza does not appear to have committed any overt hostile act[17] and been overtly correct in their behaviour,[18] they had most likely[17][18] been involved in negotiations with the enemy."[17][19] Marco Scholler believes the Banu Qurayza were "openly, probably actively," supporting Meccans and their allies.[20] Nasr writes that it was discovered that Qurayzah had been complicit with the enemy during the Battle.[21]

The Qurayza were fought and then defeated in battle, and then were allowed an arbitrator to decide their punishment. A previously allied tribe, Aws, pleaded with Muhammad for him to select an arbitrator from within the ranks of Aws. Banu Qurayza were appointed Sa'd ibn Mua'dh, a leading man among the allied Aws, a tribe that converted to Islam, whom they believed would judge in their favour. Sa'd asked the tribe which law they should be judged under, the Jewish or Muslim, and there was unanimous decision among the tribal leaders that they wished to be judged by their own Jewish laws. Sa'd passed an execution sentence against the Qurayza and 600-900 Qurayza men were beheaded (except for the few who chose to convert to Islam), all women and children enslaved, and their properties confiscated.[22] Watt writes that some of the Arab tribe of Aws wanted to honour their old alliance with Qurayza, are said to have asked Muhammad to forgive the Qurayza for their sake as Muhammad had previously forgiven the Nadir for the sake of Abd-Allah ibn Ubayy.

A minority of Muslim scholars reject the incident holding that Ibn Ishaq, the first biographer of Muhammad, supposedly gathered many details of the incident from descendants of the Qurayza Jews themselves. These descendants allegedly embellished or manufactured details of the incident by borrowing from histories of Jewish persecutions during Roman times.[23]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad's_views_on_Jews#Banu_Qurayza
 
Dec 2015
3,522
USA
#5
One of the valid points being made by the article is that Palestinian men such as Raghib al Nashashibi argued for tolerance and understanding among Jew, Muslim and Christian. Just look at how Nashashibi and his family present themselves...men dressed in suits and women in nice dresses contrary to the incorrect view that Muslims and Arabs were always big bearded people dressed in thobes out to make "2nd class citizens" out of non Muslims...a view that runs in contrast to men such as Nashashbi and certainly a large portion of modern day Arabs who embrace being both proud of their heritage and interfaith excellence.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raghib_al-Nashashibi

Palestinian politician. Raghib al-Nashashibi was born into one of Jerusalem's most prominent families and studied engineering. He was elected to the Ottoman parliament for Jerusalem and served as an officer in the Ottoman army in World War I. He was a founder of the Literary Society, an important political association, in 1918, and of the Palestinian Arab National Party in 1923. In 1920 he was appointed mayor of Jerusalem by the British, replacing a member of the rival Husayni family, a nationalist whom the British suspected of instigating anti-British demonstrations.


In 1934, after being voted out of office, Nashashibi founded the National Defense Party, which advocated compromise with the British and the Zionists. He was a member of the Arab Higher Committee from 1936 to 1937 but left because of disagreements with Hajj Amin al-Husayni and his supporters over British proposals to partition Palestine.

http://www.encyclopedia.com/politics/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/nashashibi-raghib-al-1883-1951

There are even many Arab and non Arab Israelis proud to be Israeli and also proud to be liberal and welcoming of Arab Muslims. One must keep in mind that the early IDF days were inclusive of liberal Jews whom fought for the USSR. These types of liberal Jews historically have opposed the bigoted overt nationalistic type viewpoints presented by modern day Israeli and Palestinian officials who both go against the traditions of peace and tolerance inherent in Judaism and Islam. Look up the Maki party for example....
 
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Mar 2012
18,030
In the bag of ecstatic squirt
#6
Feb 2012
9
North Idaho
#7
Read the Quran, Muhammad makes it quite clear how he feels about the Jewish people and their treatment of his people. There has been enmity between these two groups of people since before Islam existed.
 
Jun 2012
7,162
Malaysia
#8

There are even many Arab and non Arab Israelis proud to be Israeli and also proud to be liberal and welcoming of Arab Muslims. One must keep in mind that the early IDF days were inclusive of liberal Jews whom fought for the USSR. These types of liberal Jews historically have opposed the bigoted overt nationalistic type viewpoints presented by modern day Israeli and Palestinian officials who both go against the traditions of peace and tolerance inherent in Judaism and Islam.
Exactly. A good example: Miko Peled, son of an Israeli general, and himself a former general in IDF, author of the book 'The General's Son'.
 
May 2016
974
Nabataea
#9
Read the Quran, Muhammad makes it quite clear how he feels about the Jewish people and their treatment of his people. There has been enmity between these two groups of people since before Islam existed.
the Jewish of Arabia, and the ones who had encounters with Muhammad in Hijaz.. were pretty much ethnic Arabs who were adherent of Judaism. although we remember the mistreatment of the Jews by Muhammad and his early followers, no one remember the poor Arab pagans who Muhammad killed, looted, seized their lands, and destroyed their temples. since no one will call out their misery, not even for memorial. actually It's something worthy of celebrating. and Mecca's former pagan temple is now a holy site for Islam that receive annual visitors by Millions.
 
Mar 2012
18,030
In the bag of ecstatic squirt
#10
Islam was founded that way indeed. Killing people can never promote peaceful existence with other cultures like the Jews and those pagans who were also brutally killed by early muslims under the leadership of their warrior leader.