Best Allied World War II general?

Nov 2019
127
United States
FYI as much as I disdain Stillwell, he deserves the lionshare of credit for keeping the Chinese supplied, the British were largely uninterested in the support China needed.
 
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Apr 2014
406
Istanbul Turkey
Would be an interesting argument had Japan had the naval forces to supply them, but from Midway forward the Japanese Navy was in freefall to it's demise. Britain's success in Imphal owes a huge debt of gratitude to the destruction of shipping by the US Navy.

They had a through naval and logistics supply base and Singapore and Rangoon and inshore shipping from China over Gulf of Siam which US Navy could not reach but it was lack of inland logistics supply route , from Burma , especially lack of a railway line that crippled Japanese advance from Burma to India till 1944 (it is called Death Railway due to high level of casaulties among slave labour including Burmase , Siamese , Thais , Malayans and Allied POWs) Once railway was complated after much delay Japanese dared to launch Operation U-GO towards Kohima and Imphal though their logistical resources were still pretty insufficient.
 

Lord Fairfax

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
3,427
Changing trains at Terrapin Station...
. Britain's success in Imphal owes a huge debt of gratitude to the destruction of shipping by the US Navy.
And America's success in WWII also owed a huge debt to the British.

British technology given to the US included the cavity magnetron, proximity fuses and advanced shipborne radar (search & gunnery)

In the first year of the war the British Empire supplied more than 80% of the Allied (non Soviet) shipping tonnage, without which the war effort would have stalled.
The largest shipping company in the Pacific was the Canadian Pacific Shipping Lines (CP Ships) which were heavily utilized by the Americans.
 
Feb 2018
245
US
I don't know the answer to this question (nobody really stands out as incredible), but I cannot recommend Slim's memoirs enough. It may be the best one of a general I've ever read.
 
Nov 2019
127
United States
And America's success in WWII also owed a huge debt to the British.

British technology given to the US included the cavity magnetron, proximity fuses and advanced shipborne radar (search & gunnery)

In the first year of the war the British Empire supplied more than 80% of the Allied (non Soviet) shipping tonnage, without which the war effort would have stalled.
The largest shipping company in the Pacific was the Canadian Pacific Shipping Lines (CP Ships) which were heavily utilized by the Americans.
I think the 2710 Liberty ships the United States manufactured between 1942 and 1945, and the 510 Victory ships outweighed any other shipping of the Pacific campaigns.

Yes the magnetron was an important development, am personally quite well aware of it, having worked with linear accelerators (a US creation) for most of my professional life. I. I. Rabi at the MIT Rad Lab (in the US) was the person responsible for reducing the wavelength of the magnetron to the smaller 6cm and 3cm bandwidth, and finally to the 1cm bandwidth:


The Radiation Laboratory officially opened in November 1940, using 4,000 square feet (370 m2) of space in MIT's Building 4, and under $500,000 initial funding from the NDRC. In addition to the Director, Lee DuBridge, I. I. Rabi was the deputy director for scientific matters, and F. Wheeler Loomis (no relation to Alfred Loomis) was deputy director for administration. E. G. ("Taffy") Bowen was assigned as a representative of Great Britain.
Even before opening, the founders identified the first three projects for the Rad Lab. In the order of priority, these were (1) a 10-cm detection system (called Airborne Intercept or AI) for fighter aircraft, (2) a 10-cm gun-aiming system (called Gun Laying or GL) for anti-aircraft batteries, and (3) a long-range airborne radio navigation system.
To initiate the first two of these projects, the magnetron from Great Britain was used to build a 10-cm "breadboard" set; this was tested successfully from the rooftop of Building 4 in early January 1941. All members of the initial staff were involved in this endeavor.
Under Project 1 led by Edwin M. McMillan, an "engineered" set with an antenna using a 30-inch (76 cm) parabolic reflector followed. This, the first microwave radar built in America, was tested successfully in an aircraft on March 27, 1941. It was then taken to Great Britain by Taffy Bowen and tested in comparison with a 10-cm set being developed there.
For Project 2, a 4-foot- and later 6-foot-wide (1.2 then 1.8 m) parabolic reflector on a pivoting mount was selected. Also, this set would use an electro-mechanical computer (called a Predictor-correlator) to keep the antenna aimed at an acquired target. Ivan A. Getting served as the project leader. Being much more complicated than the Airborne Intercept and required to be very rugged for field use, an engineered GL was not completed until December 1941. This eventually was fielded as the ubiquitous SCR-584, first gaining attention by directing the anti-aircraft fire that downed the about 85 percent of German V-1 flying bombs ("buzz bombs") attacking London.[5]
Project 3, a long-range navigation system, was of particular interest to Great Britain. They had an existing hyperbolic navigation system, called GEE, but it was inadequate, in both range and accuracy, to support aircraft during bombing runs on distant targets in Europe. When briefed by the Tizard Mission about GEE, Alfred Loomis personally conceptualized a new type of system that would overcome the deficiencies of GEE, and the development of his LORAN (an acronym for Long Range Navigation) was adopted as an initial project. The LORAN Division was established for the project and headed by Donald G. Fink. Operating in the Low Frequency (LF) portion of the radio spectrum, LORAN was the only non-microwave project of the Rad Lab. Incorporating major elements of GEE, LORAN was highly successful and beneficial to the war effort. By the end of hostilities, about 30 percent of the Earth's surface was covered by LORAN stations and used by 75,000 aircraft and surface vessels.[6]
Following the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor and the entry of the U.S. into World War II, work at the Rad Lab greatly expanded. At the height of its activities, the Rad Lab employed nearly 4,000 people working in several countries. The Rad Lab had constructed, and was the initial occupant of, MIT's famous Building 20. Costing just over $1 million, this was one of the longest-surviving World War II temporary structures.
Activities eventually encompassed physical electronics, electromagnetic properties of matter, microwave physics, and microwave communication principles, and the Rad Lab made fundamental advances in all of these fields. Half of the radars deployed by the U. S. military during World War II were designed at the Rad Lab, including over 100 different microwave systems costing $1.5 billion.[7] All of these sets improved considerably on pre-microwave, VHF systems from the Naval Research Laboratory and the Army's Signal Corps Laboratories, as well as British radars such as Robert Watson-Watt's Chain Home and Taffy Bowen's early airborne RDF sets.
The resonant-cavity magnetron continued to evolve at the Rad Lab. A team led by I.I. Rabi first extended the operation of the magnetron from 10-cm (called S-band), to 6-cm (C-band), then to 3-cm (X-band), and eventually to 1-cm (K-band). To keep pace, all of the other radar sub-systems also were evolving continuously. The Transmitter Division, under Albert G. Hill, eventually involved a staff of 800 persons in these efforts.
The most ambitious Rad Lab effort with long-term significance was Project Cadillac. Led by Jerome B. Wiesner, the project involved a high-power radar carried in a pod under a TBM Avenger aircraft and a Combat Information Center aboard an aircraft carrier. The objective was an airborne early warning and control system, providing the U. S. Navy with a surveillance capability to detect low-flying enemy aircraft at a range in excess of 100 miles (161 km). The project was initiated at a low level in mid-1942, but with the later advent of Japanese Kamikaze threats in the Pacific Theater of Operations, the work was greatly accelerated, eventually involving 20 percent of the Rad Lab staff. A prototype was flown in August 1944, and the system became operational early the next year. Although too late to affect the final war effort, the project laid the foundation for significant developments in the following years.[9]
As the Rad Lab started, a laboratory was set up to develop electronic countermeasures (ECM), technologies to block enemy radars and communications. With Frederick E. Terman as director, this soon moved to the Harvard University campus (just a mile from MIT) and became the Radio Research Laboratory (RRL). Organizationally separate from the Rad Lab, but also under the OSRD, the two operations had much in common throughout their existences.
 
Nov 2019
127
United States
They had a through naval and logistics supply base and Singapore and Rangoon and inshore shipping from China over Gulf of Siam which US Navy could not reach but it was lack of inland logistics supply route , from Burma , especially lack of a railway line that crippled Japanese advance from Burma to India till 1944 (it is called Death Railway due to high level of casaulties among slave labour including Burmase , Siamese , Thais , Malayans and Allied POWs) Once railway was complated after much delay Japanese dared to launch Operation U-GO towards Kohima and Imphal though their logistical resources were still pretty insufficient.
Little importance in the long run can be made of what production of munitions could occur from sources in Vietnam, Malaysia, or Singapore. Other than the Burmese that joined the Japanese in the attacks on India, and a division of India's own people who fought alongside the Japanese, no troops were coming to reinforce the Japanese in those attacks. Instead Japan was taking their best commanders and soldiers from China, in a final attempt to stop the US Forces from reconquering the islands that led to a potential invasion of Japan, and who were strangling the oil that Japan needed from the Dutch East Indies.

American submarines and aircraft were decimating the Japanese shipping in the South China Seas at rates the Japanese could not replace.
 
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Nov 2019
6
The Arctic
Hugh Dowding for me. Having the balls to stand up to Chamberlain and then Churchill in resisting sending air reinforcements to France which may have been lost. His leadership in the Battle of Britain was superb. Even more remarkable when you factor in the 'dissent' within R.A.F. which including far more than just the 'Big Wing' controversy. I appreciate that in this modern day most of us accept that Operation Sea Lion was unlikely to happen regardless of air superiority and the outcome of this battle. However Dowding allowed the Allies their first significant victory over the Axis. This was a HUGE prestigious victory and gave a much needed boost to British morale.

The use of Airplanes may not have been new in 1940 but effective air doctrines were and what Dowding (and Park) achieved at Fighter Command was impressive.