Best Fighter Aircraft of WW2

redcoat

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,900
Stockport Cheshire UK
the Me 109 has the dubious distinction of having killed more German pilots than the enemy
landing it was an acrobatic feat , any cross wind made it a horrendous experience
While the later models were hazardous to land and take off due to the tendency to swing and ground loop, there is little evidence that the fatality rate for it's pilots in accidents was anything near as bad as your claim suggests.
It was the 🚀 powered Me 163 Komet which managed to kill more of its own pilots than enemy pilots.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,388
Sydney
toward the end of the war ,it's engine was giving it a definite torque
it was apain when flying but at landing it wanted to flip

I guess "the later models " could refer to the Israeli operated , czeck supplied Me109 powered by a jumo engine
the pilots called it "the mule" and swore it was an evil machine trying to kill them
the Spanish had some retrofired with an Alison , it was sweeter and they called it "the pigeon"
 

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,817
Spain
toward the end of the war ,it's engine was giving it a definite torque
it was apain when flying but at landing it wanted to flip

I guess "the later models " could refer to the Israeli operated , czeck supplied Me109 powered by a jumo engine
the pilots called it "the mule" and swore it was an evil machine trying to kill them
the Spanish had some retrofired with an Alison , it was sweeter and they called it "the pigeon"

Right. My father flew Heinke He - 111 with Roll Royces engines!!! Because Junker Jumos were short of power! he told me one day they were bound to crash a mountain in Malaga... because lacked of power in Junker Jumo! (but of course... Jumo was a very very very used engine for the time my father flew in He-111).
 
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redcoat

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,900
Stockport Cheshire UK
I guess "the later models " could refer to the Israeli operated , czeck supplied Me109 powered by a jumo engine
the pilots called it "the mule" and swore it was an evil machine trying to kill them
Even on some of the higher powered later Luftwaffe models there was problems with engine torque and a tendency to want to swing violently when taking off. Also while the landing gear on the Bf 109 was a couple of inches wider than the Spitfire, the wheels were slightly splayed outwards, which had the unfortunate tendency to encourage a ground lope when landing poorly, a common accurance when flown by the badly trained pilots who were the mainstay of the Luftwaffe fighter arm in the last year's of the war
the Spanish had some retrofired with an Alison
They replaced all of the engines in their version of the Bf 109 with the RR Merlin engine post war.
 
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Nov 2019
233
United States
I would have to say that when you take all the considerations into the argument, including range, speed, altitude, dogfighting capacity, ability to carry heavy loads of armaments into consideration, both the P-51 and the P-47 are pretty awesome birds. Of all the aircraft in this discussion they both remained active in the military for longer periods of time than the other aircraft mentioned, with the P-51 holding the honor of being the longest serving of all the craft mentioned.
 

redcoat

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,900
Stockport Cheshire UK
I would have to say that when you take all the considerations into the argument, including range, speed, altitude, dogfighting capacity, ability to carry heavy loads of armaments into consideration, both the P-51 and the P-47 are pretty awesome birds. Of all the aircraft in this discussion they both remained active in the military for longer periods of time than the other aircraft mentioned, with the P-51 holding the honor of being the longest serving of all the craft mentioned.
The Spitfire remained in operational service with its home nation for longer than either the P-51 or P-47 did with their home nation.
The Spitfire was in RAF service from 1938 until 1954, while the P-47 was in USAAF service from 1942 until 1957, and the P-47 was in service with the USAAF from 1941 until 1955.
Of course the P-47 and P-51 did remain in service with a number of small Central and South American nations for a lot longer, but this had more to do with the financial constraints on these nations defence budgets rather than anything else.
 
Nov 2019
233
United States
The Spitfire remained in operational service with its home nation for longer than either the P-51 or P-47 did with their home nation.
The Spitfire was in RAF service from 1938 until 1954, while the P-47 was in USAAF service from 1942 until 1957, and the P-47 was in service with the USAAF from 1941 until 1955.
Of course the P-47 and P-51 did remain in service with a number of small Central and South American nations for a lot longer, but this had more to do with the financial constraints on these nations defence budgets rather than anything else.
The P-51, then changed in name to the F-51 on the event of the formation of the USAF remained in duty until 1957 with the Air Force reserve. The assigned role was ground support. There was even an attempt during the Vietnam era to reintroduce it under a new license by a Wichita, Ks. manufacturer. That was squelched by other longer term plans, but financially it made a lot of sense.
 
Oct 2014
273
Poole. UK
For the allies, I would say P51 easily. For my fellow Brits? don't take it too badly. Remember, the P51 was built to British specifications, it was designed to retain the best virtues of the Spitfire whilst eliminating the weak points (especially the short range), then it took a British engine to turn it into the superstar it became.
 
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Aug 2019
137
Netherlands
If we look at performance based planes like p51's, instead of proven palmares, then a TA 152 should be mentioned too.