Best Military Tactics In History.

Oct 2014
4
Inverness
#31
Julius Caesar building fortifications around Alesia in 52 BC . Wellingtons defensive positions at Torre Vedra 1810 and the defensive success it gave him over the French. But there are many (different) tactical methods which have been used to great tactical success. Although not always translated into the strategic successes of the two above:
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Apr 2019
67
United States
#32
I'm surprised no one has mentioned the Mongols. They could basically launch a bunch of arrows and then use their quickness to charge the opponent. Their quickness was easy for feigning retreats and flanking and they could outmaneuver their enemies in close range and use their sabers.
 
Oct 2010
8,495
#33
There is no "best" Military tactic, in any general or universal sense. Tehre are principels that you can talk about but the dveil is always in the details, context, opponent, armies, terrain,. There's best in this situation or that situation, but without the conext "best" is meaningless. Whatever tactic can be examined tehre will be a case where it lead to utter disaster, fiegn retareat so easily turns into real restreat and panic. Tactics are situational and cannot be evaluated outside of their conext.
 
May 2018
589
Michigan
#34
Julius Caesar building fortifications around Alesia in 52 BC . Wellingtons defensive positions at Torre Vedra 1810 and the defensive success it gave him over the French. But there are many (different) tactical methods which have been used to great tactical success. Although not always translated into the strategic successes of the two above:
.
Torres Vedras is an underrated campaign for Wellington. He managed to defeat an entire French Army under the command of one of Napoleon's best Marshals with nominal casualties with the French suffering egriegiously.
 
#35
The feint retreats of the huns, mongols and other nomadic tribes were immesly successfull countless times and was to a large extent what made them so powerful.
The most effective weapon they had was logistics.

They could plague your lands like locusts and you couldn't attack them unless they stood their ground which they rarely did unless they thought they could win.

They were also coming from the East in tidal waves of hordes, a tribe could start of small but as they head West defeating and absorbing Turkic tribes along the way that 1,000 tribe could become 20,000 within a few years in a snowball effect.

There really wasn't much most kingdoms could do unless they had a high stone wall city and could hold out or until the Gun powder era ended their effectiveness for good.
 
Mar 2016
741
Australia
#36
There really wasn't much most kingdoms could do unless they had a high stone wall city and could hold out or until the Gun powder era ended their effectiveness for good
They were defeated in a few pitched battles by European kingdoms, and in the 14th century the Golden Horde was defeated repeatedly and pushed out of Europe for good, and this was before gunpower became a big factor. It was only the initial wave of Mongol invasions in the mid-13th century that were devastatingly effective and hard to counter.
 

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