Bligh or Christian

Who was to Blame Bligh or Christian?


  • Total voters
    41

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,087
Iowa USA
I actually meant to vote that Bligh was by far mostly in the right.

Please very carefully read these categories!
 

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
14,135
Navan, Ireland
I actually meant to vote that Bligh was by far mostly in the right.

Please very carefully read these categories!
It should read was Bligh more sinned against than sinner.

TJ Adams thread is worth a read.

I do find it amazing that two centuries after this minor naval event its had many book, three films and countless discussions on something so trivial --the Bounty wasn't even a 'ship'.
 

jackydee

Ad Honorem
Jan 2013
4,569
Brigadoon
Im in favour of Bligh for sure. The evidence has to be pretty strong to justify a mutiny, and the evidence just isn't that strong to justify this one.
 

unclefred

Ad Honorem
Dec 2010
6,731
Oregon coastal mountains
The films had their bias, the underdog triumphs, but in reality it was Christian that should have been hanged. (according to the nature of the times).
 
Jan 2010
1,016
NC
Dang, meant to vote for Bligh:eek: guess that will teach me to look at the options before voting, in my defense though i've only just gotten up. Anyway from the bit i know the mutiny wasn't because Bligh was particularly nasty but because the mutineers didn't want to leave their tropical paradise.
 
Dec 2014
1,082
Europe
I do find it amazing that two centuries after this minor naval event its had many book, three films and countless discussions on something so trivial
I've been wondering about this too. Is there any reason, other than milking a romantic underdog story, why the mutiny on HMS Bounty became so popular? Did it actually have any lasting historical consequences? Was there some radical change to navy discipline following the trial or something?
 

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,087
Iowa USA
I've been wondering about this too. Is there any reason, other than milking a romantic underdog story, why the mutiny on HMS Bounty became so popular? Did it actually have any lasting historical consequences? Was there some radical change to navy discipline following the trial or something?
Is the popularity of the story an Australian import?

Bligh served as a very high royal civil administrator in Australia after his career as a Naval officer. It is easy to imagine Bligh as an unpopular civil servant. In response to the perception of him was the story romanticized in Australia?
 

Vladd

Ad Honorem
Feb 2011
5,561
England
I've been wondering about this too. Is there any reason, other than milking a romantic underdog story, why the mutiny on HMS Bounty became so popular? Did it actually have any lasting historical consequences? Was there some radical change to navy discipline following the trial or something?
The reason it became popular was because after the events, I believe, political opponents of Bligh were responsible for the production of a book putting the story all the mutineers way and painting Bligh in a poor light. Years later a film producer was mooching through a second hand book store found a copy and thought it would make a great film, and once the public have seen a story on screen that version of events tends to stick.
 

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
14,135
Navan, Ireland
I've been wondering about this too. Is there any reason, other than milking a romantic underdog story, why the mutiny on HMS Bounty became so popular? Did it actually have any lasting historical consequences? Was there some radical change to navy discipline following the trial or something?
Nope its of no consequence whatsoever a completely minor foot note in British naval history that 'should be forgotten' (not that any history should be forgotten).

It wasn't even a 'HMS' the boat was too small an unimportant and the only RN officer on the ship was 'Captain' (lieutenant) Bligh. It wasn't even the most bloody or dramatic mutiny of the period --HMS Hermoine a full blown 32-gun frigate the crew mutinied and killed almost all the officers and defected to the Spanish.

Ironically Bligh did have 'radical' views on Naval discipline --- he was very humane and believed flogging should be kept to a minimum , there were sadistic flogging Captains but Bligh wasn't one of them.
 
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