Bloodiest Crises Throughout History

Aug 2013
956
Italy
#3
Throughout the history, what are some of the most bloody and interesting historical events you guys can think of?
Hello direwolves,

Please see my recent thread "What went wrong in the Dutch Republic?" in the modern history forum...There you can read about a horrifying episode in which a wild mob murdered the Dutch prime minister and his brother, tore them to pieces and then...ate their livers and other internal organs! I'm not joking, this was one of the bloodiest and maddest events in history. It happened in 1672.
 
Feb 2017
132
Pacific Ocean
#4
Please see my recent thread "What went wrong in the Dutch Republic?" in the modern history forum...There you can read about a horrifying episode in which a wild mob murdered the Dutch prime minister and his brother, tore them to pieces and then...ate their livers and other internal organs! I'm not joking, this was one of the bloodiest and maddest events in history. It happened in 1672.
I think that two casualties is not considered 'bloody' at all, if you take into account that African and Middle-Eastern history is pretty old, filled with wars since Sumer. If you consider General History, then it gets even worse — I really don't know if this compares to two World Wars, some dozens of minor conflicts, some civil wars, many protests gone wrong, terrorist attacks, internal repressions, and other bloody stuff that happened just in the 20th century.

Throughout the history, what are some of the most bloody and interesting historical events you guys can think of?
The first one I can think of is the Scramble for Africa, that might have caused maybe 100 million deaths, if all civil and border wars caused by it are taken into account.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,704
Portugal
#5
The first one I can think of is the Scramble for Africa, that might have caused maybe 100 million deaths, if all civil and border wars caused by it are taken into account.
The all Scramble for Africa may have been the bloodiest “crises” in African history since evolved almost all Continent. But where does that number appear? 100 million deaths seems to me a lot of millions…
 
Feb 2017
132
Pacific Ocean
#6
The all Scramble for Africa may have been the bloodiest “crises” in African history since evolved almost all Continent. But where does that number appear? 100 million deaths seems to me a lot of millions…
The book Waves of War, by Andreas Wimmer, has some nice statistics about wars worldwide in the last 200 years. Also, more than 100 wars already happened (and are still happening) in Africa since the Scramble. Congo's wars by themselves seem to have killed some 6 million people directly, and many more indirectly by famine and diseases.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,704
Portugal
#7
The book Waves of War, by Andreas Wimmer, has some nice statistics about wars worldwide in the last 200 years. Also, more than 100 wars already happened (and are still happening) in Africa since the Scramble. Congo's wars by themselves seem to have killed some 6 million people directly, and many more indirectly by famine and diseases.
It still seems a lot of millions for a relative short period of time, but obviously I won’t comment because I don’t know the book or the methodology.

About Congo’s wars you are referring those during the Scramble for Africa, and the consequent Free State (1885-1908), and not afterwards? The decolonization was also quite a blood bath, but probably not that much compared with the Free State.
 
Feb 2017
132
Pacific Ocean
#8
About Congo’s wars you are referring those during the Scramble for Africa, and the consequent Free State (1885-1908), and not afterwards? The decolonization was also quite a blood bath, but probably not that much compared with the Free State.
I'm referring to all Congolese wars since the second half of the 19th century, as they all seem to be related directly or indirectly to the Scramble for Africa. It seems to me that the Free State and the decolonization are direct consequences, and the First and Second Congo Wars in the end of the 20th century seem indirect consequences of the Scramble, as they were related, among other factors, to conflicts between ethnic groups that could have been avoided if different frontiers were established. But I am no expert in the matter, and could easily be wrong about these assumptions.
 
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