Bodhisattva influence on Shaolin Kung Fu

Zoopiter

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
2,027
Stele and documentary evidence shows the monks historically worshiped the Bodhisattva Vajrapani's "Kimnara King" form as the progenitor of their staff and bare hand fighting styles.
Shaolin Kung Fu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Can anyone tell me how much does Bodhisattva influence on Shaolin Kung Fu? I'm aware that in Chinese Buddhism, club are being replace by staff but what about the bare hand fighting styles? There are 72 Chinese martial arts, did the Chinese develop it themselves are is it foreign?

[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_72_Shaolin_martial_arts]List of the 72 Shaolin martial arts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]
 
Mar 2011
751
Midwest
Shaolin Kung Fu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Can anyone tell me how much does Bodhisattva influence on Shaolin Kung Fu? I'm aware that in Chinese Buddhism, club are being replace by staff but what about the bare hand fighting styles? There are 72 Chinese martial arts, did the Chinese develop it themselves are is it foreign?

List of the 72 Shaolin martial arts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Vajrapani has been considered a Buddhist guardian deity for a long time. He was associated with Shaolin from at least the 9th-century. The idea that he created their staff method was a story created in the 13th- or 14th-century to mask the historical defeat of Shaolin by rebels.

Prof. Meir shahar suggests, based on documentary evidence, that Shaolin didn't start practicing unarmed boxing until the 17th-century. Prof. Peter Lorge, on the other hand, believes the so-called "martial monks" were actually non-ordained security forces hired by the more devote community to protect its interests and to help the dynasty whenever necessary. Both scholars, however, consider Shaolin a library of martial arts as opposed to a publisher. So the 72 arts were probably created outside of the monastery and later associated with it by being labeled "Shaolin." I would guess the list doesn't predate the 19th century.
 

Zoopiter

Ad Honorem
Apr 2012
2,027
Vajrapani has been considered a Buddhist guardian deity for a long time. He was associated with Shaolin from at least the 9th-century. The idea that he created their staff method was a story created in the 13th- or 14th-century to mask the historical defeat of Shaolin by rebels.

Prof. Meir shahar suggests, based on documentary evidence, that Shaolin didn't start practicing unarmed boxing until the 17th-century. Prof. Peter Lorge, on the other hand, believes the so-called "martial monks" were actually non-ordained security forces hired by the more devote community to protect its interests and to help the dynasty whenever necessary. Both scholars, however, consider Shaolin a library of martial arts as opposed to a publisher. So the 72 arts were probably created outside of the monastery and later associated with it by being labeled "Shaolin." I would guess the list doesn't predate the 19th century.
I see, so in other words, the Chinese develop Shaolin kung fu themselves?
 
Feb 2010
598
Alabama
To piggy back on what has already been said by ghostexorcist...

There were already Martial Arts in China before Bodhi..

The influence maybe less Martial than we are lead to believe.

Also, Prior to the 1600's throughout the world, Martial Arts were weapons based for obvious reasons. The monks were not stupid and no different than anyone else. The evidence of unarmed fighting is very young.
 
Mar 2011
751
Midwest
I see, so in other words, the Chinese develop Shaolin kung fu themselves?
Yes, Shaolin kung fu is Chinese. Chinese boxing was developed over thousands of years by many different people. Boxing was never a useful skill on the battlefield, so it was used primarily by civilian strongmen. These men brought their martial skills with them when they came to stay at Shaolin. The temple became extremely famous during the 20th-century due to Wuxia literature. This caused many people to associate their styles with Shaolin to attract more students.

However, Shaolin, or at least the martial monks (if they were even ordained), were known for their skills with military weapons like the spear for centuries. They first took it up sometime prior to the 7th-century to help protect the monastery from mountain bandits. This skill waxed and waned during the various dynasties. There was at least one time where spear specialists from outside the monastery had to be called in to rejuvenate the practice.