Books about Spanish settlement of SF Bay?

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,248
Spain
#11
That's useful information Martin, thank you for sharing that. To be honest my main reason for asking for books was in case I could not find any Spanish speakers to help me with research, but if I have folks on this website who can translate info from Spanish-language source, that is fine :)

Do you have any information on the breakdown of San Francisco's population ca. 1776-1821? For example how many men, women, children? How many indios, criollos, mestizos, etc.? Or any numbers for employment? (for example, soldiers vs. farmers vs. craftsmen, etc.)
Thanks for your answer acix,

Hello Acix.

Information about matter is hard because mostlly non-digitalized.

You can watch some tables in this link: Alta California

However, the tables about Estado de las misiones en la Nueva California del año 1789 (in fact from 1783 onwards) are in AGNM (Archivo General Nación Mexico). But in AGNM I couldn´t find any option to watch digital documents (Web not even in English version).
The information you are looking for I guess it is in Serie Californias (Several volumens.. I guess in Volumen 12). They are records about Spanish period in Alta California.

AGNM is very important to know for the history of California because most of Spanish records were gathered there and when Mexico was independent in 1821.. the archives were hold there.

Maybe you can find one volumen (12) in some USA university... I read maybe University of Ohio have a digitalized version (in original language) but I couldn´t find.

Well, about people I guess most of them were Mestizos, some whites as Spaniards (Criollos and Peninsulares) and Indians and I guess some negroes. The main factor of Spanish colonization in California.. well in North America were the indians, the american natives. (Indios y franciscanos en la construcción de la Alta California = Indians and Franciscans priest in the construction of High California)

Anza´s expedition was a land expedition from Nogales to San Francisco with 247 settlers and 1.000 cows. It was a great feat: 1.500 kms walking in 1777. And he only lost a life but during the expedition were born 3 babys.. So he arrived to San Francisco with 249 settlers!

The Spanish dream of converting the New California in a Catholic utopia it gradually faded away, although they laid the foundations of a new society that inherited the Mexican independent state. The dream was passed to the chimera of golden fever in Northern San Francisco. When thousands and thousands of people from the whole of the world directed their steps towards California, they just revived (without knowing) the Old Spanish navigators and conquistadores dreams who since 16th Century drew on map one of the most solid Utopias in history of mankind. Still when young people travel to California... they are reviving to Portolá, Anza, Gálvez, Serra etc etc. and their Utopia.

Regards.
 
Likes: Mando
Nov 2010
7,513
Cornwall
#12
acix - you're going to have to learn Spanish with all these interests of yours:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Banderas-l...s+lejanas&qid=1556182155&s=books&sr=1-1-spell

I found this very interesting. Of course they never actually settled much at all. That was the whole problem. They couldn't get anyone to settle much north of Mexico and were easily pushed out. It's mostly about presidios and missions with client native farmers etc. This book deals with every little post and incident there was.

It translates as:

Far off flags - The Exploration, Conquest and Defence by Spain of the Territory of the Present-day US
 
Apr 2019
35
U.S.A.
#13
Precisely! The original Anza expedition departed the presidio de tubac. (Tubac was later deserted and soldados transfered to a new presidio de Tucsón in 1775) There is a book that can be bought, (or used to be able to) through “Los Californianos” that is a heritage assn. of descendants of Spanish/Mexican California. They used to also have copies at the US National hist site “mission tumacácori” in Southern AZ. The Anza trail was shut down in 1781 by the Quechen natives there in Yuma.
 
Apr 2019
35
U.S.A.
#15
That's useful information Martin, thank you for sharing that. To be honest my main reason for asking for books was in case I could not find any Spanish speakers to help me with research, but if I have folks on this website who can translate info from Spanish-language source, that is fine :)

Do you have any information on the breakdown of San Francisco's population ca. 1776-1821? For example how many men, women, children? How many indios, criollos, mestizos, etc.? Or any numbers for employment? (for example, soldiers vs. farmers vs. craftsmen, etc.)[/QUOTE


OH,, you mean like a CENSUS?
http://www.sfgenealogy.org/sf/ca1790.htm
#sanfrancisco
 
Sep 2018
101
transitory
#17
And that's after a couple of hundred years. Next to nothing in population really, which is why it got lost!!
Well, a couple of hundred years of territorial claims. But as we know, with Spain, they claimed a heck of a lot more territory than they ever physically controlled. The SF Bay area didn't have any permanent Spanish presence until the second half of the 18th century...
 
Likes: Mando
Apr 2019
35
U.S.A.
#18
The “Spanish” in fact did very little for the settlement of SF or for that matter the SW USA. Mexico pretty much supplied the endeavers with resouces and manpower for the job. Most of the settlers, pobladores, were mestizos, mulatos, indios or coyotes. Few were actually even purebred or criollos and even less from Spain itself. I do know that Anza was criollo of basque descent. The father or grandfather of Pio Pico, Dolores was mulato. Anza signed up his volunteers in Mexico and they were provided with provisions for the settlement from Mexico.
 
Likes: acix

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