Books on West Africa?

jehosafats

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
2,088
...
#2
The 16-18th centuries were dominated by the slave trade. So virtually anything you come across will deal mainly with the triangle trade. I'm interested in the Kanem-Bornu/Bornu Sultanate, but last time I checked I found nothing up to date. There's many encyclopedias to choose from, but for this period you have to be more specific given the general upheaval of the region.
 
Mar 2012
380
#3
Why?? You do realize that during this same period and before Millions of Europeans were trafficed as Slaves not only in the Americas and Europe but also in the Islamic World and Heavily in North Africa, so why is it that 99.9% of books on European history does not mention the enslavement of their people, yet no book on SSA is complete with out a mention of slaves and slavery.

This one is probably the best on the market for Middle Age West Africa. and though I have not read it, I have had passages scanned and typed out to me that are very useful..


Some quotes from off an Amazon review



P. 40 quote from Yaqut

"The king of Zafun is stronger than the veiled people of the Maghreb and more versed in the art o kingship. The veiled people acknowledge his superiority over them, obey him and resort to him in all important matters of governmentOne year the king, on his way to the pilgrimage, came to the Maghreb to pay a visit to the commander of the Muslims, the veiled king of the Maghreb, of the tribe of Lamtuna. The Commander of the Muslims met him on foot, wheras the king of Zafun did not dismount for him."
page 44

From Ibn Sa'id

"This sultan has authority there over kingdoms such as those of the Tajuwa, Kawar, and FazzanGod has assisted him and he has many descendants and armies. His clothes are brought to him from the capital of Tunish. He has scholars around him

The region where Zaghawa wander is to the east of Manan. They are for the most part Muslims owing obedience to the sultan of KanimTo the north of Manan are the terrirory of the Kanim the Akawwar wander. Their well-known towns are in the Second Clime and they are Muslims owing obedience to the sultan of Kanim"
page 45

"There is no town worthy of mention in this section (second climate) except for Awdaghust. A mixture of Muslim Berbers inhabits it, but authority rests with the Sanhaja. There is an account of this town and its ruler in al-Bakri. It is on the line of the Second Clime in longitude 22 degrees. In the same latitude is Zafun, which belongs to pagan Sudan and whose ruler enjoys a good reputation among (other) kings of the Sudan"
Page 99 from Ibn Khaldun

"Sultan Abul-Hasan was well known for his ostentatious ways and his presumption to vie with the mightiest monarchs and adopt their customs in exchanging gifts with their peers and counterparts and dispatching emissaries to distant kings and far frontiers. In his time the king of Mali was the greatest of the kings of the Sudan and the nearest to his kingdom in the Maghrib. Mali was 100 stages distant from the southern frontiers of his realms"


[ame="http://www.amazon.com/Medieval-West-Africa-Scholars-Merchants/dp/1558763058/ref=cm_cr_pr_pb_t"]Medieval West Africa: Views from Arab Scholars and Merchants: Nehemia Levtzion, Jay Spaulding: 9781558763050: Amazon.com: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51k4KJs5HFL.@@AMEPARAM@@51k4KJs5HFL[/ame]

I plan on getting a copy soon, Ive been slacking TBH.

The 16-18th centuries were dominated by the slave trade. So virtually anything you come across will deal mainly with the triangle trade. I'm interested in the Kanem-Bornu/Bornu Sultanate, but last time I checked I found nothing up to date. There's many encyclopedias to choose from, but for this period you have to be more specific given the general upheaval of the region.
 

jehosafats

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
2,088
...
#4
I would consider the 1500-1700s a transitional period. The Askiyas were on the decline, the Oyo empire wasn't yet dominate, the Hausa were expanding, the Akan were growing stronger, Benin was becoming a major slave trading kingdom, the Mossi were severely weakened, Idris Alooma was putting Kanem-Bornu on stronger footing. These events and others would help define the period, in addition to the Portuguese and the Dutch entering West African politics.
 
Mar 2012
380
#6
Well the Mande/Sonnike people were def. the dominant people as far back as old Ghana is concerned. Its clear from Muslim Megrebi Sources that the Kings of Ghana were the dominant role in terms of Trade between North and S. Saharan Africa. It is during this time you get Berbers setting up in Walata to trade.

I would consider the 1500-1700s a transitional period. The Askiyas were on the decline, the Oyo empire wasn't yet dominate, the Hausa were expanding, the Akan were growing stronger, Benin was becoming a major slave trading kingdom, the Mossi were severely weakened, Idris Alooma was putting Kanem-Bornu on stronger footing. These events and others would help define the period, in addition to the Portuguese and the Dutch entering West African politics.
 
Dec 2012
1,130
Savannah, GA
#7
Hmm, I was hoping for more help ha ha. I ask because I recently read a book entitled The Diligent, which had some very interesting portions on how the slave trade operated within Africa and how it affected politics in the region.
 
Jan 2013
5
I live in Santa Cruz, but I am from Redwood city (
#8
One of my favorite history books is titled "Servants of Allah: African Muslims Enslaved in the Americas" by Sylviane A. Diouf. It does deal, obviously, with the trans-Atlantic African slave trade, but it goes into great detail about the politics, pre-history, and economy of West Africa (as well as religious factors) at that time. She even goes into how that slave trade affected and operated within Africa. It is extremely well researched and has all sorts of sources listed. Every page is filled with great information and it is very well written. Hope you look into it/hope this helps
 
Oct 2012
802
Bristol, England
#9
[ame="http://www.amazon.co.uk/Africa-Biography-Continent-John-Reader/dp/0140266755/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1358277397&sr=8-2"]Africa: A Biography of the Continent: Amazon.co.uk: John Reader: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41RCZPvomSL.@@AMEPARAM@@41RCZPvomSL[/ame]

This is a good overview of the history of Africa as a whole, it has sections on subsaharan Africa in the middle ages and early modern periods, but obviously given the scope of the book you might find it too brief on the areas you're specifically interested in.
 

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