Books written by pioneers/settlers about their experience

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,745
SoCal
#11
William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation talks about the Pilgrim settlers in Plymouth.
Very interesting! :)

I noticed that you only mentioned North of Africa, but since there weren’t Portuguese colonies in the North of Africa, unless we consider the fortress and trading posts, I will give an example from Southern Africa, around Angola, to be more precise.
I said "et cetera" in my post, which implies that there are other examples of this that I didn't explicitly mention.

Silva Porto, a Portuguese “sertanejo” (bushman), pioneer, adventurer, trader, explorer established a trade emporium in Belmonte, founded a city that later had his name, todays Cuíto in the province of Bié, Angola, and traded and dealt with the African kings in the interior (Barotze).

He wrote “Viagens e apontamentos de um portuense em África.” / “Voyages and notes of a man from Porto in Africa”, in many volumes (I think that they are more than 40). Only excerpts were published in 1942.

Wikipedia link for the basics, about Silva Porto: António da Silva Porto - Wikipedia

And about Barotze: Barotseland - Wikipedia
Why weren't the whole volumes published? Also, were these excepts ever translated into English?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,463
Portugal
#12
I said "et cetera" in my post, which implies that there are other examples of this that I didn't explicitly mention.
Ok. I also had that idea.

Why weren't the whole volumes published?
I even think that they aren’t digitalized. They need to be worked, since are still hand written. And the volumes are many, Silva Porto didn’t wrote particularly well (ie. often he was boring…), and the Portuguese market is quite small, so it is quite a risk to the publisher even to try a limited edition. Probably it just is not profitable! Probably a institutional edition is needed and until now nobody cared.

Also, were these excepts ever translated into English?[/QUOTE]

I doubt it.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,745
SoCal
#14
Ok. I also had that idea.
Yeah, I mean, I didn't want to literally write out every possible example of this. Plus, AFAIK, few Europeans actually settled south of the Sahara with the exception of in South Africa due to the fact that the climate in most of Sub-Saharan Africa was intolerable for Europeans (due to malaria, et cetera).

I even think that they aren’t digitalized. They need to be worked, since are still hand written. And the volumes are many, Silva Porto didn’t wrote particularly well (ie. often he was boring…), and the Portuguese market is quite small, so it is quite a risk to the publisher even to try a limited edition. Probably it just is not profitable! Probably a institutional edition is needed and until now nobody cared.
What do you mean "until now"? Are you suggesting that this has recently changed?

I doubt it.
OK.

Anyway, do you know of any other examples of books and/or other works that meet the criteria for my question here?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,463
Portugal
#16
What do you mean "until now"? Are you suggesting that this has recently changed?
I mean that possibly one day something can change. The documents are available for researchers, as far as I know. So maybe someday can appear an institutional edition or a doctoral thesis about it. There is academic interest, but maybe there isn’t enough public interest.

Anyway, do you know of any other examples of books and/or other works that meet the criteria for my question here?
In the sense of settler, not that I read or at least that I recall now. I already saw mentions to memories/notes of some Boers in the Southern Africa, 19th century, but never read it and don’t recall the titles.

Others that I read can be better described as conquerors/warriors than as pioneers (the letters of Hernan Cortez to the king Carlos I). That narrate more generic processes and not individual ones.

On the other hand the “History of the Philippines”, by Antonio de Morga, available in English at History of the Philippine Islands : Morga, Antonio de, 1559-1636 : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive narrates us the arrival of the first Spanish settlers there and the beginning of the colonization. So it tells us some interesting stories.

The same theme have the letters of López de Legazpi to the king, Filipe II: "Cartas al Rey Don Felipe II: sobre la expedicion, conquistas y progresos de las islas Felipinas", but I don’t know if they are available in English. But again, these works about the Philippines don’t narrate us the path of an individual, but the all, more generic, process of colonization. I just mentioned Morga because he is available online and in English.
 
Jun 2017
278
maine
#17
"In Their Own Words" (Solveig Zempel, 2013) - she has compiled and translated letters from Norwegian settlers in the midwest.
"Following the Waters" (Astrid Tollefsen) - her family (and others, all Norwegian) settling in New Bedford, Massachusetts

I don't know if these would count because they are not by the settlers themselves:
Scandinavian Immigrants in New York, 1630-1874 (John O. Evjen, 1916) - series of biographies
The Colony that Rose from the Sea (David Maruk) - on the Norwegian settlers in Brooklyn

Most historical societies here in New England archive accounts of early settlers.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,745
SoCal
#18
"In Their Own Words" (Solveig Zempel, 2013) - she has compiled and translated letters from Norwegian settlers in the midwest.
"Following the Waters" (Astrid Tollefsen) - her family (and others, all Norwegian) settling in New Bedford, Massachusetts

I don't know if these would count because they are not by the settlers themselves:
Scandinavian Immigrants in New York, 1630-1874 (John O. Evjen, 1916) - series of biographies
The Colony that Rose from the Sea (David Maruk) - on the Norwegian settlers in Brooklyn

Most historical societies here in New England archive accounts of early settlers.
Very interesting! Thanks! :)

I mean that possibly one day something can change. The documents are available for researchers, as far as I know. So maybe someday can appear an institutional edition or a doctoral thesis about it. There is academic interest, but maybe there isn’t enough public interest.
Makes sense. BTW, is the Portuguese that these documents are written in easily understood by present-day Portuguese people? Did Portuguese significantly change over the last 500 years?

In the sense of settler, not that I read or at least that I recall now. I already saw mentions to memories/notes of some Boers in the Southern Africa, 19th century, but never read it and don’t recall the titles.

Others that I read can be better described as conquerors/warriors than as pioneers (the letters of Hernan Cortez to the king Carlos I). That narrate more generic processes and not individual ones.

On the other hand the “History of the Philippines”, by Antonio de Morga, available in English at History of the Philippine Islands : Morga, Antonio de, 1559-1636 : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive narrates us the arrival of the first Spanish settlers there and the beginning of the colonization. So it tells us some interesting stories.

The same theme have the letters of López de Legazpi to the king, Filipe II: "Cartas al Rey Don Felipe II: sobre la expedicion, conquistas y progresos de las islas Felipinas", but I don’t know if they are available in English. But again, these works about the Philippines don’t narrate us the path of an individual, but the all, more generic, process of colonization. I just mentioned Morga because he is available online and in English.
Thank you very much for this information, Tulius! Anyway, how many Spaniards actually settled in the Philippines? Also, how many Portuguese actually settled in Sub-Saharan Africa?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,745
SoCal
#19
@Reformed Protestant: Do you know of any books and/or other documents that were written by Polish and/or Czech settlers in the Recovered Territories and/or the Sudetenland after 1945? After all, these Poles and Czechs could also be viewed as being pioneers since they settled territories that became sparsely populated as a result of the mass expulsion of Germans from these territories.
 
Jun 2017
278
maine
#20
"In Their Own Words" (Solveig Zempel, 2013) - she has compiled and translated letters from Norwegian settlers in the midwest.
"Following the Waters" (Astrid Tollefsen) - her family (and others, all Norwegian) settling in New Bedford, Massachusetts

I don't know if these would count because they are not by the settlers themselves:
Scandinavian Immigrants in New York, 1630-1874 (John O. Evjen, 1916) - series of biographies
The Colony that Rose from the Sea (David Maruk) - on the Norwegian settlers in Brooklyn

Most historical societies here in New England archive accounts of early settlers.
Sorry! Wrong date on Evjen's book--it SHOULD be 1630-1684. Well, what's 200 years (or so) among friends?
 

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