Brazil - an unique country.

Tairusiano

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
2,975
Brazil
Brazil wasn't independent, but it was already The Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and Algrave and the decision making was in Brazil (with the court in Rio de Janeiro).
Also, regarding Acre, I agree, but it still defeats the original argument of this thread that "Brazil never aspired to conquer neighboring countries".

Finally, not entirely relevant to this discussion but that might help put things in perspective, a video I made on BR:

The Court was in Brazil because of Napoleon, but still the the court was ruled by Portuguese, decision making was Portuguese one, and the interest were Portuguese, and altrough Brazil was a united kingdom it was still a colony, brazilians had small to nearly nothing influence on Portuguese court, Brazilians would start to have more power under Pedro I
 
Sep 2017
21
South Carolina, USA
Brazilians,

There are many similarities between our countries, USA and Brazil, both beginning as European colonies and having many similar problems.

What do Brazilians presently think about Dom Pedro II?
 

Tairusiano

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
2,975
Brazil
Brazilians,

There are many similarities between our countries, USA and Brazil, both beginning as European colonies and having many similar problems.

What do Brazilians presently think about Dom Pedro II?
Hello drew welcome to historum.

He is seen with respect, of course there is brazilians that dont know him, but in general he is seen in good light.
In reality there are movement's in Brazil to restore the monarchy, and even today the royal family, is called Imperial Family and they still carry the tittle's like Dom, Prince Imperial of Brazil, Head of the Brazilian Imperial House.
 
Sep 2017
21
South Carolina, USA
Tairusiano, thank you for the welcome.

I enjoyed reading your blogs. I am going to have to get a map and reread to fully understand them. I noticed "Skull collector" under your icon and wonder if there is a connection to the Mundukuru (please pardon the spelling, sure I have it wrong). Thank you for sharing your research.

A question got me on this thread and your blogs on the Indians give me more questions. Excuse my ignorance. As the thread says, Brazil is a unique country.
 
Jul 2017
335
Argentina
Hey Tairusiano.
I've been to brazil many times. Read books, magazines and journals. Talked to lots of people. Seen tv. Watched movies.
I never knew nothing about an imperial family known as such, holding any tittle.
Only one of the characters in "Gabriela, cravo e canela" says she was descen of that family.
Who are they? Where do they live??
 

Tairusiano

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
2,975
Brazil
Tairusiano, thank you for the welcome.

I enjoyed reading your blogs. I am going to have to get a map and reread to fully understand them. I noticed "Skull collector" under your icon and wonder if there is a connection to the Mundukuru (please pardon the spelling, sure I have it wrong). Thank you for sharing your research.

A question got me on this thread and your blogs on the Indians give me more questions. Excuse my ignorance. As the thread says, Brazil is a unique country.
Yes Skull collector is from the Munduruku it was the biggest title a man could have, he would need more than 1.000 heads it was like master hunter, so after I meet the 2.000 post of historum I gave me the title:lol:.
 

Tairusiano

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
2,975
Brazil
Hey Tairusiano.
I've been to brazil many times. Read books, magazines and journals. Talked to lots of people. Seen tv. Watched movies.
I never knew nothing about an imperial family known as such, holding any tittle.
Only one of the characters in "Gabriela, cravo e canela" says she was descen of that family.
Who are they? Where do they live??
There are three branches of the family, Petropolis, Vassouras and Saxe-Coburg-Bragança, all three clains the "throne", Petropolis one is the more famous, but the Vassouras is more active in his campaign for Monarchism, it is interesting the city of Petropolis still pay a tax called Laudêmio to sustain the family.
Here the site of the Vassouras branch with his history,
Casa Imperial do Brasil
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,630
San Antonio, Tx
What about Cuba, Philippines, small Central America countries?
Yeah, interesting. The US didn’t stay in Cuba; it was in the Philippines for about 42 years or s after hundreds of years of Spanish colonization after which it formally left following the defeat of the Japanese occupying forces there. The US was never very comfortable in the role of occupying colonial power but it has maintained a “soft” connection to the Philippines ever since. The smaller Latin American states were instances of economic imperialism mostly brought on by the depredations of the United Fruit Company in Central America who were, I’m told, backed up by small marine companies - imperialism in a can, as it were. So yes, there was a brief period where the US engaged in this sort of imperialism.

The longest lasting fruits of this imperialism are the US Virgin Islands - bought from Denmark - and Puerto Rico, taken from Spain in the Spanish American War.
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,733
Don't see any real reason to somehow regard Brazil as morally superior to anything based on lack-of-overseas-colonies and the like. Brazil has done PLENTY of colonisation. It's just that it has been the kind that is sometimes referred to as "internal colonisation" (when done by Russia, or the Scandinavians for that matter). First Brazil had to work out how to effectively control all that immense expanse of land. If anything the "Bandeirentes" phenomenon has always struck me as a very decent analogy for the Cossacks in Sibiria.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,872
Portugal
Don't see any real reason to somehow regard Brazil as morally superior to anything based on lack-of-overseas-colonies and the like. Brazil has done PLENTY of colonisation. It's just that it has been the kind that is sometimes referred to as "internal colonisation" (when done by Russia, or the Scandinavians for that matter). First Brazil had to work out how to effectively control all that immense expanse of land. If anything the "Bandeirentes" phenomenon has always struck me as a very decent analogy for the Cossacks in Sibiria.
The Bandeirantes, from flag (bandeira), “Bandeirentes” seems a bit odd in Portuguese, were Portuguese, not Brazilian, since at the time Brazil was a colony.

When the independence was reached the frontiers were more or less defined. Even if there were some later adjustments, they can be considered minor.

Although I found curious your analogy with the Cossacks.