Breach of international law (in Libya f.e.)?

Jul 2013
758
Germany
#1
Dear historians,
today I looked through a case of an alleged breach of international law in Libya, in times of the Arab Spring.
There might be some fictional moments (for it's an example of a law case) in the case, I'm not an Libya expert, but the case is summarized thusly:

Gaddafi's (G) troops besieged eastern parts of Libya (of Bengasi especially) after the rebels showed their displeasure about G's regime.
Thereupon, the armed forces of France (on behalf of the United Nations - UN) carried air strikes out to fight G's troops and to defend the human rights of innocent Libyans. The state president of France justified the intervention amongst others with the arguments that french citizens were in Libya in times of menace and violation, plus that G's regime would violate all of the human rights in Libya.

So... When G's troops, under General Saif (son of Gaddafi) moved back and tried to abscond, the general and one of his wife were killed by the very same rebels.

Some questions are tied to the case - Was the intervention of the UNO troops coming from France (the UNO doesn't have own, unified troops) a breach of international law? What about the "prohibition of the use of force"? There are clear answers verbalized to it, but I'd like to know more.

What do you personally think about the interventions of the UN, about interventions from outside cutting into civil war constellations, situations?
 
Last edited:

RoryOMore

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
3,395
USA
#5
Some questions are tied to the case - Was the intervention of the UNO troops coming from France (the UNO doesn't have own, unified troops) a breach of international law? What about the "prohibition of the use of force"? There are clear answers verbalized to it, but I'd like to know more.
I don't know a lot about use of force, but is your question, essentially, whether an act approved by the UN Security Council can be a violation of international law? I don't think so - I think they're essentially sovereign.
 

Nemowork

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
8,356
South of the barcodes
#6
Dear historians,
today I looked through a case of an alleged breach of international law in Libya, in times of the Arab Spring.
There might be some fictional moments (for it's an example of a law case) in the case, I'm not an Libya expert, but the case is summarized thusly:

Gaddafi's (G) troops besieged eastern parts of Libya (of Bengasi especially) after the rebels showed their displeasure about G's regime.
Thereupon, the armed forces of France (on behalf of the United Nations - UN) carried air strikes out to fight G's troops and to defend the human rights of innocent Libyans. The state president of France justified the intervention amongst others with the arguments that french citizens were in Libya in times of menace and violation, plus that G's regime would violate all of the human rights in Libya.

So... When G's troops, under General Saif (son of Gaddafi) moved back and tried to abscond, the general and one of his wife were killed by the very same rebels.

Some questions are tied to the case - Was the intervention of the UNO troops coming from France (the UNO doesn't have own, unified troops) a breach of international law? What about the "prohibition of the use of force"? There are clear answers verbalized to it, but I'd like to know more.

What do you personally think about the interventions of the UN, about interventions from outside cutting into civil war constellations, situations?
Just to get in before the inevitable 1991 ban (does it update every year?) then from what i remember the UN authorised a no-flight zone and gave permission for the coalition forces to mitigate civilian casualties but refused to allow foreign powers to put troops on the ground and banned anyone from giving or selling weapons to either side.

The west slightly overstepped their boundaries by extending civilian protection into attacking the people threatening those civilians.

The abuse and murder of Ghaddafi after his capture was done by Libyans on a Libyan on Libyam territory, i was an internal matter for the local court ssytyem to sort out.

How that is different from a Libyan army killing Libyan citizens inside Libyan borders is a difficult question and has more to do with politics than legality except that if it caused a flood of refugees to surrounding states it would have been an international problem.
 

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