British itv series "Victoria"

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,313
Las Vegas, NV USA
#21
Reviews of Itv Victoria's Season 2 (seen in the US this year) say the depiction of the Queen's response to the Irish famine is too favorable to her. The claim is that she really didn't care much about the situation. Her diary is mentioned but not directly cited. This well documented essay seems to refute that. "Queen Victoria's Other Island" cites her diaries and other sources to indicate she was very much involved. It's true Dr Trail was never was asked to visit. In fact I don't see what a visit would do but take him away from his work. The two exchanged letters.

It was only later in her reign after Fenian violence that an older, more conservative Victoria voiced her discontent. Her 1849 visit (starting in County Cork) was a success highlighting her personal skills with both crowds and the "big shots".


Scroll up to start from the beginning: 'Queen Victoria's Other Island'

https://books.google.com/books?id=6...diary entries on the famine 1845-1849&f=false
 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,313
Las Vegas, NV USA
#22
During the Bedchamber Crisis, the young queen (just before her 20th birthday) plunged the country into a constitutional crisis after Melbourne resigned. Victoria did reluctantly ask Sir Robert Peel to form a government but drew the line at giving up two of her ladies in waiting who she considered close friends. The drama is reasonably close to the facts, although there were several meetings between the Queen and Peel. They agreed on most things, but on this, the Queen wouldn't budge. It wasn't necessarily her intention to get Melbourne back, but she wasn't unhappy when Peel refused to serve.

Melbourne was under the impression Peel wanted all of her ladies to resign when in fact it was only two. The video below includes a scene that is not supported by any record, but may well have happened. Why did Melbourne have the wrong impression? Did the Queen mislead him? In the video she says "all my ladies"(edited). By this time Melbourne knows better and they argue. Melbourne walks out leaving the Queen without a government. Peel wasn't very keen on forming a minority government and the Queen was intransigent, so Melbourne was persuaded to return. Something like this scene may have actually happened.

 
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Jan 2015
3,320
Front Lines of the Pig War
#23
A few other things. There were no dripping tallow candles, no infestation of rats, and the entire "downstairs drama" is complete fiction trying to imitate "Upstairs Downstairs" or "Downton Abbey". There's more but I'll save that for another thread and refer back to this one.
I really like Jenna Coleman, but I hate crappy or distorted history. :sad:

What was the downstairs drama?
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,313
Las Vegas, NV USA
#24
I really like Jenna Coleman, but I hate crappy or distorted history. :sad:

What was the downstairs drama?
It was the parallel drama with the palace staff, most of which is pure fiction. There was a Marianne Skerrett who as far as I know wasn't impersonating anyone and who was the Queen's dresser. There was also a real chef Francatelli but the Palace Stewart (Penge) was entirely made up.

I agree re Jenna Coleman. She is underrated as an actress IMO. She was probably too pretty to play the Queen but that's the nature of the business.
 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,313
Las Vegas, NV USA
#25
Victoria: "willful" or "strong willed"? Does she play the obedient little wife and mother or does she assert her rights as the monarch? Perhaps the central issue about her reign is played out in this clip from Season 2.

 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,313
Las Vegas, NV USA
#26
In Germany Salic Law prevailed. It expressly forbade women from inheriting royal or imperial authority. Albert clearly agreed with this and in real life he seems to have eventually persuaded Victoria that he was right. However that time was not yet at this point in the drama when Victoria tells Albert IDGAF (in a Victorian way) about his opinions.

 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,313
Las Vegas, NV USA
#27
The 1843 visit of Victoria and Albert to France was a real event and Victoria did have an image of her dog on her handbag and a pale English complexion. They did negotiate the outline of an 'Entente Cordial' But unlike the drama, the agreement lasted nearly three years before the French Prince married the Spanish Queen. It ended with the new Whig government in 1846, but good relations had been established between the French and British foreign ministers so that not even Palmerston could wreck them completely

http://www.guizot.com/en/politics/entente-cordiale/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFL4t2GjPzE
 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,313
Las Vegas, NV USA
#28
I consider these to be some of the funniest scenes from part one. Of course I might have a slightly warped sense of humor.


"Do you find me much changed?":zany:
 
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Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#29
I watched the first season with modest interest. I wonder if future season will portray her as the self absorbed, rotund little object she was.

For accurate information about Victoria and her reign, I recommend "The Victorians" by A N Wilson. Also "London;The Biography" by Peter Ackroyd. Fun reads


"A brilliant evocation of a generation that, at least for the English, is both very much alive and has “vanished totally.”
Over the course of just a few decades in the 19th century, England grew from regional force to global power as it was remade from “a primarily rural community governed at local level paternalistically, at a national level aristocratically” to “an industrial country governed nationally by plutocrats, locally by bureaucrats.” A noted novelist (Dream Children, 1998), biographer (Jesus: A Life, 1992), and historian of ideas (God’s Funeral, 1999), Wilson ably crosses genres to give readers a portrait of the Victorian era that blends eminent lives with big events and ideas, all delivered in a fluent narrative. Born in 1950, he writes, he belonged to the last English generation that could know this bygone world as “an almost remembered oral tradition” through the anecdotes of elderly compatriots who had been alive during Victoria’s reign. Where those tales conflict with received history, Wilson rolls up his sleeves and hits the archives to correct either the anecdote or the historical record. His cast of characters numbers in the hundreds: Dickens, Darwin, Dodgson, and Disraeli are but a few of the Ds, and even Dostoyevsky makes an appearance, though perhaps to be indexed under another Wilsonian theme, the Death of God. Settings range from the high streets of London and England’s provincial capitals to slums, wharves, crofts, and factories. Wilson links all these stories, scenes, and players together with some well-defended generalizations, including a few that would do Marx proud: he doesn’t just state the obvious fact that “the fortunes of the Victorian millionaires, the mill-owners, the mine-owners, the engineers and the speculative builders were founded on the suffering of others,” he immediately adds, “nor was this suffering accidental.”
An altogether excellent look at the Victorian era, with all its flaws and glories."

THE VICTORIANS by A.N. Wilson | Kirkus Reviews
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,313
Las Vegas, NV USA
#30
I watched the first season with modest interest. I wonder if future season will portray her as the self absorbed, rotund little object she was.

For accurate information about Victoria and her reign, I recommend "The Victorians" by A N Wilson. Also "London;The Biography" by Peter Ackroyd. Fun reads
Of course she was self absorbed (and short). She was Queen Regnant of the British Empire so no one could to speak to her without her addressing them first. Since she was known to be polite, well mannered and kind (except when she wasn't), she couldn't go around bothering people. However she did care for Albert and that's all that mattered. Over one hundred books have been written about her and she wrote some 60 million words in journal entries, official correspondence and private letters (in English, French and German).

A N Wilson wrote two books on the subject: "Victoria" and "The Victorians"

Two seasons have been shown in the US and a third begins this month. It will go at least to the revolutionary year 1848 when mobs in London threatened the royal family forcing them to go to their new home on the Isle of Wight. Victoria was 29 in 1848 so not yet the truly rotund lady she would become.
 
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