British itv series "Victoria"

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,869
Las Vegas, NV USA
#31
The first episode of the the third season aired in the US yesterday. The first thing I noticed was that Lord Palmerston, while correctly arrogant , was hardly a man of his true age (64 in 1848). He looked more like
this:


Victoria looked very pregnant and she was pregnant most of the time by midcentury. In general these were perilous times for royalty and King Louis Philippe did hightail it to Britain again. I say again because he look refuge there during the first French Revolution before he was king. The problem is he looked completely different than the Louis Philippe in a previous Season 2 episode which historically was 6 years earlier.I guess that actor wasn't available.

In general there were no major historic misrepresentations that I found except for good looking actors for not necessarily good looking people. I thought the Victoria on the follow up show about about Victoria's wedding looked much more like the real young queen probably looked.

Any comments?
 
Last edited:
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#33
I urge anyone interested in the life and times of Queen Victoria to read "The Victorians" by A N Wilson. It' a fairly thicks tome, but well worth the effort.

Be interesting to see how the series treats her relationship with her servants John Brown. and "The Munshi" ,Abdul Karim.

.
The Victorians

A. N. Wilson
W.W. Norton, 2004 - History - 724 pages
4 Reviews

The nineteenth century saw greater changes than any previous era: in the ways nations and societies were organized, in scientific knowledge, and in nonreligious intellectual development. The crucial players in this drama were the British, who invented both capitalism and imperialism and were incomparably the richest, most important investors in the developing world. In this sense, England's position has strong resemblances to America's in the late twentieth century.

As one of our most accomplished biographers and novelists, A. N. Wilson has a keen eye for a good story, and in this spectacular work he singles out those writers, statesmen, scientists, philosophers, and soldiers whose lives illuminate so grand and revolutionary a history: Darwin, Marx, Gladstone, Christina Rossetti, Gordon, Cardinal Newman, George Eliot, Kipling. Wilson's accomplishment in this book is to explain through these signature lives how Victorian England started a revolution that still hasn't ended.
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User Review - AlCracka - LibraryThing
Comes highly recommended...I'm told not to be intimidated by its length, as it moves quickly, and it ties Victorian novels in a lot, which I love. Read full review
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User Review - John_Vaughan - LibraryThing
Andrew Norman Wilson wrote a book Eminent Victorians and so did Lytton Strachey, but in the early 1900s, thereby confirming Strachey as an Eminent Victorian himself. However Wilson’s prose makes for ... Read full review
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,869
Las Vegas, NV USA
#34
In season 3 episode 2 we see the climax of the Chartist uprising. Actual history indicates it was less violent than depicted. Victoria gave birth in March and the demonstrations were in April. About 30,000 Chartists showed up. 100,000 were expected. They were confined to south of the Thames and later delivered their demands to Parliament through the back door. Nothing much changed and the movement died out because of lack support from the growing middle class. The royal family did leave for the Isle of Wight without protest before the crowds came. The King of France never stayed in the Palace. There was no cache of rifles and if there were, Palmerston didn't do it:oops:

The most dramatic moment of the episode was when the Queen ordered the coach to stop, stepped onto the street, and demanded that Duke of Wellington allow the leading Chartists to march peacefully to Parliament to deliver their demands.The Duke bows his head and says "Yes Your Majesty''. It was beautiful but it never happened. I can't find anything about Victoria's obnoxious half sister. She did have an older half sister and half bother (Carl) but they didn't make much history.

BBC - History - British History in depth: The Chartist Movement 1838 - 1848
 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,869
Las Vegas, NV USA
#36
^
The most dramatic moment of Season 3 episode 2. Victoria orders The Duke to allow the Chartists safe passage to present their petition to Parliament . She prevails, standing on a London street with Britain's most powerful men. Too bad this scene never happened. Victoria would be an old woman when the Third Reform Bill was passed and that still fell short of the Chartist's Petition.
 
Last edited:
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#37
^
The most dramatic moment of Season 3 episode 2. Victoria orders The Duke to allow the Chartists safe passage to present their petition to Parliament . She prevails, standing on a London street with Britain's most powerful men. Too bad this scene never happened. Victoria would be an old woman when the Third Reform Bill was passed and that still fell short of the Chartist's Petition.

Yeah, a lot of bullshit is passed off under the guise of 'dramatic /poetic licence'
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,869
Las Vegas, NV USA
#38
Yeah, a lot of bullshit is passed off under the guise of 'dramatic /poetic licence'
The producer Daisy Goodwin admitted in an online post that the scene was fiction because she wanted a Victoria that was more liberal than she really was. I went to find it so I could post it and it was gone. Anyway it's generally known that Victoria wasn't in London on that day. Many years later she would help pass the Third Reform Bill which was blocked by the House of Lords. She issued Letters Patent to make the bill law.

"During October 1884 Queen Victoria intervened in what was rapidly becoming a constitutional crisis, urging the party leaders to meet and break the deadlock. Negotiations duly started at Salisbury's London home in Arlington Street, Westminster, between the Conservative leader and Sir Charles Dilke, a member of Gladstone's cabinet. Lord Salisbury agreed to allow the reform bill to pass on condition that a bill to redistribute parliamentary seats was also enacted; the two parties reached an agreement, the "Arlington Street Compact", whereby the bulk of MPs would be elected in single-member constituencies. He calculated that this would minimise the adverse effect on the Conservatives of the extension of the vote: dividing the counties would allow Liberal-voting and Conservative-voting districts to be separated. The division of boroughs would allow the suburban areas of towns to be represented separately from the inner cities, allowing the growth of "Villa Toryism".[5][6] Dilke, a member of the Radical (socially progressive) wing of the Liberal Party, also favoured the division of boroughs to weaken the influence of the Whig faction in the party. Before 1885 many existing two-member boroughs one Whig and one Radical were nominated by agreement, often leading to uncontested elections.[5][6]"
 
Last edited:
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#40
@stevev

"This is all reality! Why the fiction??"

The fiction makes a rather odious little object (she was actually under 5 feet tall) seem more sympathetic, even entertaining. We are meant to pity her grotesque, obsessive grief, which lasted nearly 40 years.,and made everyone around her as miserable as she.
 

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