British Uniforms in the Victorian Era

Belloc

Ad Honorem
Mar 2010
5,418
USA
#31
Supposedly Napoleon stopped using the 'Royal White' for his troops when he saw the blood splattered uniforms.

Not sure if that's true or myth.
I suspect it's myth, since the Republic had already adopted blue uniforms by the time Napoleon came to power.

 

clement

Ad Honorem
Jun 2011
2,141
California, USA
#32
No, but Napoleon wanted (at least it has been said) to reintroduce the white uniform. I don't have any source on this I must say so you should take this with a grain of salt, but it has also been said that he renounced this idea when he saw the blood on the white uniforms of some regiment in which it had been reintroduced at Eylau. Which is unlikely since the weather was so cold that the soldiers would have been wearing long coats at this battle.
 

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
13,684
Navan, Ireland
#33
Roman legions didn't use red as the base colour. That's an urban myth. More likely they used an off white tunic, although we do know that red was used to mark out status.

"With no examples surviving to the present day, the colour of the legionary tunic has always been hotly debated. Many historians believe that it was red berry in colour and that this was common to legion and guard units. Some arthors argue that the legionary tunics were white. Vitruvius, Rome's chief architect during the early decades of the Empire,wrote that, of all the natural colours used in the dying of fabrics and for painting, red and yellow were by far the easiest and cheapinst to obtain. [Vitr.,OA VII, 1-2] Second century Roman general Arrian described the tunics worn by the cavalry during exercises as predominantly red berry colour ,or, an orange-brown-- a product of red. He also described multicoloured cavalry exercise tunic.[Arrian, TH, 34] But no tunic described by Arrian was white or natural in colour."

'Legions of Rome' by Stephen Dando-Collins pg 29-30
 

Belloc

Ad Honorem
Mar 2010
5,418
USA
#34
No, but Napoleon wanted (at least it has been said) to reintroduce the white uniform. I don't have any source on this I must say so you should take this with a grain of salt, but it has also been said that he renounced this idea when he saw the blood on the white uniforms of some regiment in which it had been reintroduced at Eylau. Which is unlikely since the weather was so cold that the soldiers would have been wearing long coats at this battle.
Really? Why was blue adopted in the first place by the French Revolutionary army? Any particular reason - maybe to copy the American Continental uniform?
 

clement

Ad Honorem
Jun 2011
2,141
California, USA
#35
Firstly to get rid of ancien regime symbolism I guess. Though they were some French units who already wore the blue coat, the units of the royal guard (except for the Swiss guards which, like every Swiss regiments, were in red), most notably the "gardes françaises" :



By the way, the Swiss regiments of the French army really looked like the British, i don't know how people would have amde the difference :



The Irish had red coats too, but with green instead of dark blue, and green was not used by the British army i think.
 

Nemowork

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
8,243
South of the barcodes
#36
It was used briefly by the British Legion, Tarletons cavalry force in the American revolution, the Brunswick Dragoons and other foreign units and during the Napoleonic period by the two rifle regiments.
 

clement

Ad Honorem
Jun 2011
2,141
California, USA
#37
These were "green" units. The French Irish regiments were red, but with Green decorations, collar, sleeves etc. Like these" :



 

caldrail

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
5,142
#38
This is hardly supported by evidence from military history, though.
The research featured individual combat which does not include the various factors we see on a larger national scale. Exchanges of gunfire for instance wouldn't apply whereas melee would, or should do if the information is correct, but the problem here is isloating the incidents in which this psychology can be applied to in a rational and instructive way, since in the normal scheme of things commentators of battles tend to describe the results in certain set ways.
 

okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
#39
Needed a place to share this. I just thought it was cool.


Colour Sergeant William McGregor (Regimental NÂș 2404), 1st Battalion Scots Fusilier Guards, July 1856. He was wounded during the Battle at the River Alma on 20th September 1854 and wears both the British Crimea and the Order of the Medjidie Turkish medals.
At the Crimean War's end, troops gathered in Aldershot for a London victory parade. Mcgregor was among the soldiers photographed in Aldershot by Robert Howlett and Joseph Cundall for their series of portraits entitled 'Crimean Heroes 1856'. (IWM Q 71634)

Colour Sergeant Absolam Durrant, 1st. Battalion, Coldstream Guards in Aldershot, Hampshire - July 1856. (Photograph by Robert Howlett and Joseph Cundall)

Colour Sergeant Joseph John Stanton, Colour Sergeant Kester Knight and Private William Bruce, Royal Sappers and Miners, Aldershot 1856. C.S. Knight wears the 1855 tunic with crossbelt and waistbelt and the old 'Albert' shako while Private Bruce wears the shell-jacket and undress cap. (Photograph by Robert Howlett and Joseph Cundall)
from: https://www.facebook.com/ColouriseHistory
 

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