Bronze/iron use in warring states/qin china.

HackneyedScribe

Ad Honorem
Feb 2011
6,543
Thanks, but the same article also states that the products with high carbon content was unforgeable. A bloom is not like the blast furnace where the very high carbon steel per your definition is puddled and poured into a mold. A bloomery puddles the slag and leaves the iron + carbon (varying degrees of carbon steel per your definition) in solid form which has to be forged into shape. To reduce the carbon enough into forgeable form, you still need a finery hearth that the Celts lacked.
 
Last edited:

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,249
Sydney
the main way of controlling iron smelting is by controlling the draught ,
if using natural or wind convection , a poor bloom will probably be obtained at best
a very large bloom furnace lead directly to a blast furnace , the increase in size alone raise the internal temperature
using bellows of increasing power increase the temperature of the reaction up to melt of the iron
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,947
Australia
the main way of controlling iron smelting is by controlling the draught ,
if using natural or wind convection , a poor bloom will probably be obtained at best
a very large bloom furnace lead directly to a blast furnace , the increase in size alone raise the internal temperature
using bellows of increasing power increase the temperature of the reaction up to melt of the iron
Yep. Sauder noted a correlation between the draft and the carbon content.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,947
Australia
To reduce the carbon enough into forgeable form, you still need a finery hearth that the Celts lacked.
The Celts could obviously control the carbon content and were able to forge the iron from their smelters because we have hundreds of swords proving it. I've already given the definitive work on this subject: Pleiner's The Celtic Sword.
 

HackneyedScribe

Ad Honorem
Feb 2011
6,543
The Celts could obviously control the carbon content and were able to forge the iron from their smelters because we have hundreds of swords proving it. I've already given the definitive work on this subject: Pleiner's The Celtic Sword.
They had steel swords by creating low carbon bloom iron from their bloomeries, which was then turned into wrought iron, which was then turned into steel by carburizing it. It's not by creating unforgeable high carbon steel (cast iron) directly from their bloomeries.
 
Last edited:

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,947
Australia
Sauder has demonstrated that primitive bloomeries can produce high carbon steel. It doesn't require any fancy advanced technology.
 

HackneyedScribe

Ad Honorem
Feb 2011
6,543
Producing unforgeable high carbon steel means you can't shape it into a sword,all you get is a misshappen lump of metal.
 

HackneyedScribe

Ad Honorem
Feb 2011
6,543
I doubt that's standard knowledge for the average Joe. Ergo when you say "producing high carbon steel is easy in a primitive smelter", it's only fair for me to mention that this steel was unforgeable, so it wasn't how the Celts made steel swords.
 
Last edited:

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,947
Australia
So what? There are plenty of ways to decarburise it. The easiest is to simply toss it back into the smelter with another charge of ore.