Brunei to expand use of Sharia law

Apr 2010
1,027
evergreen state, USA
#81
The citizens of Brunei have lots of benefits, I think including no income tax. But I'd have to google it to be sure. Anyway, they best keep their noses clean and enjoy their benevolent nanny state. Otherwise it is very easy to move to Malaysia next door (and be poor). I had an Anthropology professor who did research there, and she was protective of them when someone criticized that little country.
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,385
#82
The citizens of Brunei have lots of benefits, I think including no income tax. But I'd have to google it to be sure. Anyway, they best keep their noses clean and enjoy their benevolent nanny state. Otherwise it is very easy to move to Malaysia next door (and be poor). I had an Anthropology professor who did research there, and she was protective of them when someone criticized that little country.
Malaysia is not really poor, nor is it very liberal.....

Anwar Ibrahim guilty in sodomy case

Malaysia’s highest court has upheld a five-year prison sentence for opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim on a sodomy charge

But I guess he should have felt lucky not to have been stoned
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,790
Western Eurasia
#85
One more reason why Shariah is not acceptable... Political opponents can be silenced/stoned under it....
Actually no, that is one reason why judiciary should be independent, otherwise political opponents can (and are) be silenced under all legal systems (Anwar Ibrahim's case was also not under shariah court and shariah law as i understand, in fact the Malaysian Penal Code ultimately derives from the British Indian Penal Code from the 1860s).
 
Last edited:
Aug 2009
5,367
Londinium
#86
in fact the Malaysian Penal Code ultimately derives from the British Indian Penal Code from the 1860s).
This is an issue within many ex-British colonies. They took on the laws verbatim post independence but not the social, political or legal culture that created these laws, and then amended them back in the UK. Hence why many British laws which govern my life have changed since the 1860's, but not in places like Malaysia,
 

antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,755
Iraq
#87
The guy who keeps defending Brunei keeps mentioning how it won’t apply to expats, probably because he is one, but this isn’t an expat forum and I don’t think that’s what most people here are concerned about.

On the other hand, it does help to look at how it will actually be implemented and it doesn’t look like it’s quite as dire as people are making it out to be, not that I’m supporting it.
 

antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,755
Iraq
#88
A person isn't doing it, a country is.
A person has to carry it out.

Is this supposed to be a bad thing? It is good to know that there are still some people who are willing to oppose filth.
This reminds me of the 50% of British Muslims support .... or some such issue, people living in western countries but still supporting this intolerance.
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,385
#90
Actually no, that is one reason why judiciary should be independent, otherwise political opponents can (and are) be silenced under all legal systems (Anwar Ibrahim's case was also not under shariah court and shariah law as i understand, in fact the Malaysian Penal Code ultimately derives from the British Indian Penal Code from the 1860s).
Judicial independence is actually a rare thing..... (see the recent case in Canada with executive pressure on the judiciary).... Even if the judiciary IS independent, if they are working based on a medieval penal code, there cannot be good results

Also Malaysia DOES have shariah law under a dual law system

Law of Malaysia - Wikipedia

The dual system of law is provided in Article 121(1A) of the Constitution of Malaysia. Article 3 also provides that Islamic law is a state law matter with the exception for the Federal Territories of Malaysia.[1] Islamic law refers to sharia law, and in Malaysia it is known and spelled as syariah.