Cahiers du Cinema 100 Greatest Films

Oct 2018
684
Adelaide south Australia
#11
The lost glory of Hollywood?

I have long held the opinion that really good movies are relatively rare today. Plus that the gigantic financial successes tend to reinforce my belief that the popularity of movies tends to be an inverse measurement of quality, even at times, simple entertainment value.


However, as a skeptic, I try to examine my own beliefs and opinions. I concluded that these opinions may simply be prejudice based on nostalgia.

You know what they say about nostalgia?

" Nostalgia isn't what it used to be" (anon) My corollary. "---and it never was"
 
Aug 2010
15,005
Welsh Marches
#12
In this case I thinl some nostalgia is justified. Hollywood once produced many films which were real works of art in their way, the sign of that being that one can return to them again and again and enjoy them even moreand see more in them (I could think of quite a lot of classic westerns to to which this applies, to mention just one genre). Most American mass-audince films that come out nowadays are good for nothing more than providing some passing enjoyment when one is tired after work.
 
Oct 2016
54
Ashland
#13
Who can with certainty say that The Magnificent Ambersons was wrecked in the editing? Who has seen those missing 44 minutes?
I agree that, as is, it is a more interesting film than Citizen Kane or many on the list(which seems to have been voted on by octogenarians for the most part.)
For Huston, I'd add Under the Volcano and remove The Dead (an excellent adaptation, but no classic.)
The more opinions, the better.
 
Aug 2010
15,005
Welsh Marches
#14
The end of the Ambersons makes little sense as presently edited; the studio thought the original ending was too bleak, but then it should have been
 
#16
Robert Wise (director of "West Side Story" and "Sound of Music") worked as editor on "Magnificent Ambersons". According to him they had to edit the ending because studio previews weren't happy with the original cut, Orson was busy filming a documentary in South America at the time.

 
Feb 2017
167
Devon, UK
#17
Here's a more recent list from the BBC, '100 greatest foreign language films', from a poll of 200 critics from different countries. The 100 greatest foreign-language films

Many of the usual suspects included and a wider appreciation of 'Asian' cinema (not just Kurosawa and Ozu) but again Ray is the only representative from India, I'm not a big fan of Bollywood but surely there is more to admire in the enormous output of Indian cinema than just 'Pather Panchali'?
 
Jan 2017
416
UK
#18
Ritwik Ghatak is another highly regarded Indian director, his films (apart from "Cloud Capped Star") haven't received enough exposure from the wider world to get that acclaim. African cinema rarely gets mentioned in these greatest lists for similar reasons: very difficult to find a good quality print of a film with english subtitles, let alone distributing such a film to festivals where it can gain acclaim & fame.
 
Jan 2010
4,024
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#19
The latest "Sight and Sound" poll earlier this year listed Vertigo as the top film of all time (and Mulholland Drive as 28th!)., partly because they changed voting methodology for this year's (or should we say this decade's) list. So this is pretty subjective The 50 Greatest Films of All Time | Sight & Sound

I do like Rio Bravo ranking so high on this list, however. It gets better every time I see it. But one of top films of all time? really?
 
Jan 2010
4,024
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#20
In 2007 French film magazine "Cahiers du Cinema" asked 78 film critics and film historians to list the greatest films of all time in their opinion. Most lists of this type are from English-speaking countries so it's interesting to get a perspective outside of that, also interesting to see how influential American films are on French cinema.

Here's the top 100 complete with number of votes:

  1. Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941) 48
  2. Night of the Hunter (Laughton, 1955) 47
  3. Rules of the Game (Renoir, 1939) 47
  4. Sunrise (Murnau, 1927) 46
  5. L'Atalante (Vigo, 1934) 43
  6. M (Lang, 1931) 40
  7. Singin' In The Rain (Donen, Kelly, 1952) 39
  8. Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958) 35
  9. Children of Paradise (Carné, 1945) 34
  10. The Searchers (Ford, 1956) 34
  11. Greed (von Stroheim, 1924) 34
  12. Rio Bravo (Hawks, 1959) 33
  13. To Be Or Not To Be (Lubitsch, 1942) 33
  14. Tokyo Story (Ozu, 1953) 29
  15. Contempt (Godard, 1963) 28
  16. Ugetsu Monogatari (Mizoguchi, 1953) 27
  17. City Lights (Chaplin, 1931) 27
  18. The General (Keaton, 1926) 27
  19. Nosferatu (Murnau, 1922) 27
  20. The Music Room (S. Ray, 1958) 27
  21. Freaks ( Browning, 1932) 26
  22. Johnny Guitar (N. Ray, 1954) 26
  23. La Maman et la Putain (Eustache, 1973) 26
  24. The Dictator (Chaplin, 1940) 25
  25. The Leopard (Visconti, 1963) 25
  26. Hiroshima mon amour (Resnais, 1959) 25
  27. Pandora's Box (Pabst, 1929) 25
  28. North By Northwest (Hitchcock, 1959) 25
  29. Pickpocket (Bresson, 1959) 25
  30. Casque d’or ( Becker, 1952) 24
  31. The Barefoot Contessa (Mankiewicz, 1954) 24
  32. Moonfleet (Lang, 1955) 24
  33. Madame de... (Ophuls, 1953) 24
  34. Le Plaisir (Ophuls, 1952) 24
  35. The Deer Hunter (Cimino, 1978) 24
  36. L’Avventura (Antonioni, 1960) 23
  37. Battleship Potemkin (Eisenstein, 1925) 23
  38. Notorious (Hitchcock, 1946) 23
  39. Ivan The Terrible (Eisenstein, 1944) 23
  40. The Godfather (Coppola, 1972) 23
  41. Touch Of Evil (Welles, 1958) 23
  42. The Wind (Sjöström,1928) 23
  43. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968) 22
  44. Fanny & Alexander (Bergman, 1982) 22
  45. The Crowd (Vidor, 1928) 21
  46. 8 & A Half (Fellini, 1963) 21
  47. La Jetée (Marker, 1962) 21
  48. Pierrot le Fou (Godard, 1965) 21
  49. Story Of A Cheat (Guitry, 1936) 21
  50. Amarcord (Fellini, 1973) 20
  51. Beauty & The Beast (Cocteau, 1946) 20
  52. Some Like It Hot (Wilder, 1959) 20
  53. Some Came Running (Minnelli, 1958) 20
  54. Gertrud (Dreyer, 1964) 20
  55. King Kong (Schoedsack, Cooper, 1933) 20
  56. Laura (Preminger, 1944) 20
  57. Seven Samurai (Kurosawa, 1954) 20
  58. The 400 Blow (Truffaut, 1959) 19
  59. La Dolce Vita (Fellini, 1960) 19
  60. The Dead (Huston, 1987) 19
  61. Trouble In Paradise (Lubitsch, 1932) 19
  62. It's A Wonderful Life (Capra, 1946) 19
  63. Monsieur Verdoux (Chaplin, 1947) 19
  64. The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (Dreyer, 1928) 19
  65. À bout de souffle (Godard, 1960) 18
  66. Apocalypse Now (Coppola, 1979) 18
  67. Barry Lyndon (Kubrick, 1975) 18
  68. La Grande Illusion (Renoir, 1937) 18
  69. Intolerance (Griffith, 1916) 18
  70. Partie de campagne (Renoir, 1936) 18
  71. Playtime (Tati, 1967) 18
  72. Rome: Open City (Rossellini, 1945) 18
  73. Senso (Visconti, 1954) 18
  74. Modern Times (Chaplin, 1936) 18
  75. Van Gogh (Pialat, 1991) 18
  76. An Affair to Remember (McCarey, 1957) 17
  77. Andrei Rublev (Tarkovsky, 1966) 17
  78. The Scarlet Empress (von Sternberg, 1934) 17
  79. Sansho The Bailiff (Mizoguchi, 1954) 17
  80. Talk To Her (Almodovar, 2002) 17
  81. The Party (Edwards, 1968) 17
  82. Tabu (Murnau, 1931) 17
  83. The Bandwagon (Minnelli, 1953) 17
  84. A Star Is Born (Cukor, 1954) 17
  85. Mr. Hulot's Holiday (Tati, 1953) 17
  86. America America (Kazan, 1963) 16
  87. El (Buñuel, 1953) 16
  88. Kiss Me Deadly (Aldrich, 1955) 16
  89. Once Upon A Time In America (Leone, 1984) 16
  90. Le Jour se lève (Carné, 1939) 16
  91. Letter From An Unknown Woman (Ophuls, 1948) 16
  92. Lola (Demy, 1961) 16
  93. Manhattan (Allen, 1979) 16
  94. Mulholland Drive (Lynch, 2001) 16
  95. My Night At Maud's (Rohmer, 1969) 16
  96. Night And Fog (Resnais, 1956) 16
  97. The Gold Rush (Chaplin, 1925) 16
  98. Scarface (Hawks, 1932) 16
  99. The Bicycle Thieves (de Sica, 1948) 16
  100. Napoléon (Gance, 1927) 16

Dominated by French & American films, Italy & Japan have some decent representation while there are surprisingly no German films after 1931 on the list. There's a whopping 31 films from the 1950s, the 60s provided 16, the 30s 15, the 1940s had 13 entries and the 1920s managed 11. "Intolerance" was the oldest film, while "Talk To Her" and "Mulholland Drive" were the most recent films on there. Maurice Pialat's study of Van Gogh's final few months was the only film from the 1990s.
The usual suspects are there with a few unsual choices voted in (I'm looking at you Moonfleet).

Here is also the Top 50 Directors with number of votes their films received:
  1. Jean Renoir 155
  2. Alfred Hitchcock 146
  3. Fritz Lang 143
  4. Charles Chaplin 128
  5. John Ford 124
  6. Orson Welles 114
  7. Ingmar Bergman 113
  8. Luis Buñuel 110
  9. Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau 108
  10. Howard Hawks 105
  11. Jean-Luc Godard 99
  12. Federico Fellini 99
  13. Ernst Lubitsch 98
  14. Luchino Visconti 90
  15. Robert Bresson 90
  16. Kenji Mizoguchi 87
  17. Akira Kurosawa 86
  18. Max Ophuls 83
  19. Alain Resnais 82
  20. Carl Theodor Dreyer 76
  21. François Truffaut 75
  22. Stanley Kubrick 75
  23. Vincente Minnelli 73
  24. Joseph Mankiewicz 73
  25. Roberto Rosselini 73
  26. Josef von Sternberg 69
  27. Michelangelo Antonioni 67
  28. S. M. Eisenstein 65
  29. Marcel Carné 64
  30. Billy Wilder 61
  31. Buster Keaton 61
  32. Yasujiro Ozu 60
  33. Eric von Stroheim 60
  34. John Huston 59
  35. Elia Kazan 55
  36. King Vidor 53
  37. David Wark Griffith 53
  38. Maurice Pialat 52
  39. Jean Vigo 51
  40. Nicholas Ray 49
  41. Jacques Becker 48
  42. Woody Allen 48
  43. Francis Ford Coppol
  44. Jacques Demy 47
  45. Charles Laughton 47
  46. Jacques Tati 46
  47. Otto Preminger 45
  48. Leo McCarey 45
  49. Ge
Thanks for this thread BTW. When i saw Children of Paradise was going to be shown on TCM tonite, I recalled this thread and set it to record.
 

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