Can Early Slavs and Early Finno-Ugric people be describe as nomadic?

Evo

Aug 2013
630
Turkey
I mean before 1000AD.

Thanks.
As far as I know the first Slavic states appeared in Europe in 7th century A.D.
Before 1000 AD they had already literature and fine art.
So my answer is "No".
 
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Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
By 1000, Slavs and Finns had long parted. The Slavs were rather settled and agrarian long before. If they moved or migrated ( i.e., South Slavs), it was only to relieve the cramped conditions for their agrarian lifestyle. So, Slavs were not nomadic at anytime in the Common Era, in my opinion.
 

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,037
Iowa USA
Finns are a Uralic culture and language, while Slavic language was influenced by contact with Persian speaking societies.

Mr. Norus (my esteemed interlocutor from the thread "Which Empire Do You Miss the Most ? POLL"), what was the motivation to ask about disparate populations in the same OP? thanks much.
 
Mar 2014
381
Norway
Finns are a Uralic culture and language, while Slavic language was influenced by contact with Persian speaking societies.

Mr. Norus (my esteemed interlocutor from the thread "Which Empire Do You Miss the Most ? POLL"), what was the motivation to ask about disparate populations in the same OP? thanks much.
curiosity
 

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,037
Iowa USA
curiosity
What I've read (aside: we are now less than 30 days away from the return of arras who is pretty well read on early Slavs) the Slavs were involved in slash-and-burn agriculture since at least 3rd century CE.

Slavs of those centuries were in a warmer climate than Finns, so to me those are two separate question, first, were Finns of Iron Age nomadic and second were Slavs.

But, for Slavs as far as this site has educated me, it's a clear no unless we were to speculate about centuries of the Dacian kingdom or back further to pre-Hellenistic Persia, did people that become Slavs adopt farming because of contact with Persians and their economically dependent places around Black Sea?
 
Mar 2014
381
Norway
What I've read (aside: we are now less than 30 days away from the return of arras who is pretty well read on early Slavs) the Slavs were involved in slash-and-burn agriculture since at least 3rd century CE.

Slavs of those centuries were in a warmer climate than Finns, so to me those are two separate question, first, were Finns of Iron Age nomadic and second were Slavs.

But, for Slavs as far as this site has educated me, it's a clear no unless we were to speculate about centuries of the Dacian kingdom or back further to pre-Hellenistic Persia, did people that become Slavs adopt farming because of contact with Persians and their economically dependent places around Black Sea?
ok, thanks its just this article that got me curious.

Slavs - Ancient History Encyclopedia

From the article: Authors who wrote about the Slavs do not agree: some say the Slavs were nomads, and others claim they lived in permanent settlements located in forests and swamps
So i was gonna try my luck with Historum and see if anyone thinks that Slavs were nomads and what their arguments were.

As for finno-ugric people, i got a lot of them where i live, so was just curious, since they still got their reindeer herding :lol:
 

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,037
Iowa USA
@Norus, I will let arras know this question is out there when he rejoins forum.

Actually, re-reading my reply just now it occurred to me that the Ancient Persia experts are probably reading Ancient History or Middle Eastern History subforums. The really esteemed people regarding languages who post to Euro subforum seem to agree on Persian influence on Slavic.
 
Apr 2015
57
UK
Well the Finns and Slavs were not really unified peoples so you had differences, for instance talking of the Finns, many of the Finns in the farthest northern regions of Finland, Norway, Russia and Sweden were nomadic since the climate was generally not great for sustained grazing of their herds. Finns further south could generally survive in static colonies however so long as their populations did not exceed their resources.