Can medieval noble women knights defeat male mobs?

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,533
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#32
There is a difference between being given a title and actually being raised and trained as a knight. Joan of Arc was a "knight" only as much as modern people are knights. A modern knighthood grants social status but has no military connotations.

In Italy to be a "Knight" means nothing. Legally you don't acquire any social position. Italy is a Republic ...


But in Italy there is still a Knight Order with Sovereignty and even a position of "observer" at UN: the "SMOM" [Sovereign Military Order of Malta] ... the order of the "Hospitaller" during the crusades. Italy still recognizes to SMOM territorial sovereignty on some territories in Rome [the Order is no more at Malta, despite its historical name].


In the SMOM there are still knights who serve in a Army [a good part of them in the Italian Army]. But I'm not aware of women of the Order serving today.



This was just for accuracy.
 
Jan 2012
793
#33
Thank you for your information of female knight.

Is the female warrior Maximo (or Maximu) you mentioned is the "Maximu" in this link ?


It's very similar to the reenactment of the Hercules story.

I remember that Hercules defeat Hippolyta (queen of the amazons) and stripped her of the belt.:lol:
Υes it is the same one female warrior Maximo (or Maximu).

The medieval story present her as a leader (and warrior) commander of a large apelatai army unit.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,978
#34
Knights also weren't technically noblemen. They were mostly lower aristocracy or gentry without land, profession, business, or trade. A knight might be a younger son of a land owner.
 

Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,531
#36
and how much power is in that? how well directed? Look at the weight transfer , non transfer it;s hardly putting any body it's just a limb lashing out, far too high to effect a person of the ground. Whne a horse rears teh wieght transfer is backwards not forwards,.

It's nice looking move but nothing in it looks actually effective.
I think you underestimate the power horse has because it seems to be easily controlled by humans and is more often behaving like a prey/herd animal. I have seen broken bones result from forward kicks by a horse that did not look like that much as an observer.

Warhorses tended to be more aggressive temperaments and while horses forward vision is poor it can still see somewhat by turning its head slightly and if there are several people standing near its legs the odds of a kick connecting are pretty high.

Sure vs trained warriors with fighting experience against cavalry as soon as the horse stops moving and kicks at one/two people the others will move in and the fight might end right there though I think it is quite a bit more difficult to drag an armoured man with weapons off a horse than might be assumed not to mention the odds of knightly cavalry encountering well trained infantry were relatively low for large parts of the medieval era though there are several battles where dismounted knights fought vs mounted knights and won.
 
Jun 2012
7,121
Malaysia
#37
Yes, I only brought it up as an example of how a horse might fight - a random kick instead of an aimed kick that disarms an opponent. And only if trained to do so.
I do not honestly think that a horse's kick is such a so called 'random' kick.:cool:

As a matter of fact, it is part of an equine animal's inborn natural self-defence move. I hv even seen a vid clip of a zebra being chased by a lioness gv such a kick. A rearward double-foot kick, which caught the predator on its front legs. That ended up actually hobbling the lioness, effectively ending the chase.

I wud say, it works more on the basis of rate & probability, as opposed to precision of targeting which is what happens with a human fighter. But that does not make it any less effective. Try hiding behind the arse of a big strong stallion some time. You might end up being whacked 10 ft backward, as soon as that horse realised your furtive presence. And if you happened to hv a blade on you, I don't think that horse wud care two hoots about that either.
 
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Jun 2012
7,121
Malaysia
#38
I think you underestimate the power horse has because it seems to be easily controlled by humans and is more often behaving like a prey/herd animal. I have seen broken bones result from forward kicks by a horse that did not look like that much as an observer.

Warhorses tended to be more aggressive temperaments and while horses forward vision is poor it can still see somewhat by turning its head slightly and if there are several people standing near its legs the odds of a kick connecting are pretty high.

Sure vs trained warriors with fighting experience against cavalry as soon as the horse stops moving and kicks at one/two people the others will move in and the fight might end right there though I think it is quite a bit more difficult to drag an armoured man with weapons off a horse than might be assumed not to mention the odds of knightly cavalry encountering well trained infantry were relatively low for large parts of the medieval era though there are several battles where dismounted knights fought vs mounted knights and won.
Well, let's just put it this way. If it was that easy for infantry to whup cavalry, then there wud hv been no cavalry in history.
 
Jul 2018
15
China
#39
Jan 2015
2,860
MD, USA
#40
Wasn't it a case of all noblemen were knights but not all knights were noblemen?

I'm not sure I'd put it that way. Nobility was something you were born to, but knighthood had to be earned. Didn't some nobility go to the clergy rather than continue as knights? And especially later in the middle ages, a growing number of men simply stayed "squires" and did not bother to get knighted, since that involved a lot of expense.



Now and then a commoner could get knighted, generally for doing something spectacular on the battlefield. Most ended up kind of in limbo, not fully accepted by upper class or lower, as I understand it.


Matthew