Can we characterize the conflict between Yugoslavia and the Cominform as a war?

Tulun

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Nov 2010
3,851
Western Eurasia
#21
Source: Branko Petranović, Istorija Jugoslavije 1918-1988, Treća knjiga: Socijalistička Jugoslavija 1945-1988, pg. 230.


Plain, my bad. A spelling error.


Geography textbooks for minority students of the 5th and 6th grades.
Sure, I thought so it may refer to the geographic region. Without other bigger context and commentary in the textbook it seems to be innocent to me at first sight, I don't necessarily see into it territorial claims. Names like Alföld (the Plain), Nagyalföld (Great Plain), Magyar Alföld (Hungarian Plain) or Nagy Magyar Alföld (Great Hungarian Plain) were apparently often used paralelly and interchangeably at least up to the 1940s... I don't know how was it viewed in the 1950s, was it just a continuing use of a still accepted term, or the Rákosi regime revived it on purpose as a reaction to the Tito issue? I have no idea. I started my education in the 1990, we used the Plain or Great Plain name in georgraphy lessons for the region as I can recall. I don't know when exactly became the Great Hungarian Plain obsolete in Hungary.
But interesting, I will try to look around to find an old Hungarian geography text book or atlas from the era .

Diplomacy was almost non-existent beween Yugoslavia and the Soviet bloc.
I didn't necessarily meant a direct diplomatic demand being sent to Belgrade, I just wondered maybe it popped up in some diplomatic communication between Soviets and Hungarians, or some Party discussions, pamphlet, or some other clearer manifestation of these kind of desires. ( I have a general scepticism about it, because any kind of border revision suggestion would also make the Czechoslovak and Romanian comrades nervous)
 
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Maki

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Jan 2017
3,412
Republika Srpska
#22
1. Why'd they ultimately abandon their plan?
Stalin feared the West would get involved.

2. If the Soviets wanted such a huge victory, why not support the Greek Communists during the Greek Civil War? I mean, this does seem like it might have been a better investment than the Berlin Blockade and the West was going to be extremely pissed off at the Soviet Union regardless of whether it would have focused on Greece or on West Berlin.
Most historians believe that Stalin did not support the Greek Communists because, according to his "percentages agreement" with Churchill, Greece was to be in the British zone of influence.
 
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Futurist

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May 2014
21,131
SoCal
#23
Stalin feared the West would get involved.
Militarily?

Most historians believe that Stalin did not support the Greek Communists because, according to his "percentages agreement" with Churchill, Greece was to be in the British zone of influence.
But didn't Stalin also make a deal with the West to let them have West Berlin only to later try reneging on that deal with the Berlin Blockade?
 

Maki

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Jan 2017
3,412
Republika Srpska
#24
Militarily?
Yes. Would the USA have done it? Who knows? But Stalin saw in Korea that the US was ready to fight Communism by force if neccessary so he backed down and hoped that his authority among the Yugoslav Communists would led to Tito's end.

But didn't Stalin also make a deal with the West to let them have West Berlin only to later try reneging on that deal with the Berlin Blockade?
The Blockade was not neccessarily meant to expel the Western Allies from West Berlin. In fact, Stalin offered to lift it if the West withdrew the new Mark from Berlin.
 
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Futurist

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May 2014
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SoCal
#25
Yes. Would the USA have done it? Who knows? But Stalin saw in Korea that the US was ready to fight Communism by force if neccessary so he backed down and hoped that his authority among the Yugoslav Communists would led to Tito's end.
How much authority did Stalin actually have over the Yugoslav Communists?

Also, the US fought in Korea because South Korea was a US ally; Yugoslavia wasn't actually a US ally. Still, Stalin was prudent not to risk it. Being a risk taker doesn't necessarily end well; ex.: Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait.

The Blockade was not neccessarily meant to expel the Western Allies from West Berlin. In fact, Stalin offered to lift it if the West withdrew the new Mark from Berlin.
What exactly was the big deal with the German Mark?
 

Maki

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Jan 2017
3,412
Republika Srpska
#26
How much authority did Stalin actually have over the Yugoslav Communists?
A lot, actually. That is why some Yugoslav Communists sided with him. I have read the transcripts from Yugoslav Communist Party sessions of the time. Many members were shocked that Stalin was criticizing them and could not believe it because they believed the Yugoslav Communist Party was faithful to Stalinist ideals. In fact, Yugoslavia's initial response to Stalin's criticism was to actually speed up the "Stalinization" process, namely speeding up collectivization in order to prove to Stalin that he had been wrong in criticizing them. However, by 1950 it became clear that Stalin would not "drop the charges" against Yugoslavia and the Yugoslav leadership started pursuing their own path.

What exactly was the big deal with the German Mark?
The Soviets believed that the introduction of this Western currency into their sector of Berlin would weaken the Soviet grip there. In fact, the Soviets actually proposed to accept the currency reform under the condition that this reform now be done by all 4 Allied occupying powers, not just the Western ones, but the US State Department was unwilling to allow this because they feared it would give the Soviets too much power. So, the Soviets decided to block this new Western currency. As Patrick Dean told a Canadian diplomat, the Soviet actions were "exactly what Britain would have followed in the opposite contingency."
 
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Sep 2012
3,886
Bulgaria
#27
Most historians believe that Stalin did not support the Greek Communists because, according to his "percentages agreement" with Churchill, Greece was to be in the British zone of influence.
But along with Yugoslavia the other foreign country often mentioned giving support to DSE is Bulgaria, which at the time was Stalin's puppet state, ergo DSE was indirectly receiving help from Stalin. Majority of the Greek communists at the time were Stalinists by the way, but had no prob with their Yugoslav comrades, sworn enemies of the newborn second world. Kinda odd situation idd. As a side note Tito-Stalin split is probably the best thing that happened to my country /without it this defeated minor axis country could end up as part of Greater Yugoslavia.
 
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Maki

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Jan 2017
3,412
Republika Srpska
#28
It is important to note that Stalin told the Yugoslav delegate Edvard Kardelj that the Communist uprising in Greece needs to be ended because it cannot be successful. He used the following words: "The uprising in Greece must be stopped, and as quickly as possible".
 
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Sep 2012
3,886
Bulgaria
#29
By 1948 Yugoslavia had become the Soviet's most faithful ally in all of the eastern Europe. Tito was a true ally to Stalin not a puppet and Moscow had high hopes for Belgrade & invested unprecedented funds in the rearmament of the Yugoslav army. Though Stalin had to repeatedly say no to Tito when by using the patronage of USSR, the latter tried to take territories from Italy and Austria and add them to Yugoslavia, threatening to provoke a military clash with the British Empire and U.S.A. With no other European country Soviets had such mutual understanding than with Yugoslavia. Poland has always been a problem for their eastern neighbour. Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria were among the former satellites of Germany. Albania was too far away.

Albania became one of the main reasons for breaking the Soviet-Yugoslav relations. In 1948, Tito sent a telegram to Albanian leader Hoxha with a proposal to protect his country against the Anglo-American invasion from Greece by positioning an Yugoslav division on Albanian territory. At this time two Yugoslav ready for combat divisions were already positioned in Montenegro and Macedonia, near the Albanian border. Hoxha refused.

The same year the leader of Bulgaria Georgi Dimitrov gave a lengthy interview in which he supported the idea of creating a Balkan Federation and even larger Confederation of eastern European countries, which would include Hungary, Romania, Czechoslovakia and even Poland (the horror). Dimitrov was the former head of the Comintern, the hero of the Leipzig process so it provoked an anger response from London and Washington due to violation of Potsdam agreement etc.

The problem was that Dimitrov did not inform Stalin about his plans to create a confederation of East European countries, in which Yugoslavia was assigned the leading role as the most militarily strong entity. This interview of Dimitrov was considered a political mistake, but it was Tito's attempt to annex Albania, because no one doubted that two veteran Yugoslav divisions with huge combat experience would conquer Albania in no time, that caused severe reaction from the Soviets. This was the beginning of the split.
 
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Valens

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Feb 2014
8,303
Colonia Valensiana
#30
The only thing Stalin was trying to do in Yugoslavia was to assassinate Tito and eventually install a Moscow-friendly government in Yugoslavia. Tito reportedly had written a letter to Stallin asking him to stop sending people to kill him. “Stop sending these people to try and kill me. If I send one man to Moscow, I wouldn’t have to send another one”.
I don't think you are right. Stalin would not have gambled to invade Yugoslavia and risk a potential confrontation with the US in Europe. He approached the war in Korea in an extremely cautious manner. As I pointed out before, the USSR may have won the war but faced major devastation and needed time to recover from it.

Interestingly enough, Stalin may have viewed Tito as Churchill's trojan horse in his bloc, and his suspicions may have been correct, considering Tito's long-time and controversial relationship with Churchill and the British, which continued after the end of World War II. Tito was perhaps the only Communist leader who openly flirted with the British aristocracy and had connections with them. His state visit to the UK was very high profile. Was in 1953, I think, the year of Stalin's death.