Can we characterize the conflict between Yugoslavia and the Cominform as a war?

Jul 2017
157
Europe
#31
I don't think you are right. Stalin would not have gambled to invade Yugoslavia and risk a potential confrontation with the US in Europe. He approached the war in Korea in an extremely cautious manner. As I pointed out before, the USSR may have won the war but faced major devastation and needed time to recover from it.

Interestingly enough, Stalin may have viewed Tito as Churchill's trojan horse in his bloc, and his suspicions may have been correct, considering Tito's long-time and controversial relationship with Churchill and the British, which continued after the end of World War II. Tito was perhaps the only Communist leader who openly flirted with the British aristocracy and had connections with them. His state visit to the UK was very high profile. Was in 1953, I think, the year of Stalin's death.

Stalin would not openly invade Yugoslavia, but he would use some Eastern European soviet satellite states to stir issues, maybe Hungary.
 

Valens

Ad Honorem
Feb 2014
8,303
Colonia Valensiana
#32
Stalin would not openly invade Yugoslavia, but he would use some Eastern European soviet satellite states to stir issues, maybe Hungary.
The fallout of such an action would very likely outweigh the benefits. Soviet leadership was reluctant to intervene in Hungary when the revolution broke out, and Hungary had been firmly integrated into the Soviet bloc - Yugoslavia was not.
 
Nov 2015
1,925
Kyiv
#33
My mother was a wife of an officer in the Soviet Army. Once a week in their garrison the zampolit (Deputy of the regiment commander for political affairsthe, late analogue of the commissar) gathered all the wives of the officers for political studies - политзанятия - and told them about the political situation in the world. She was a very Soviet man, and from her I can judge how Soviet propaganda influenced the minds of adult citizens of the Soviet Union at that time.

So - I remembered that she called Tito a traitor and said that she had read the book The Yugoslav tragedy, which convincingly told that Tito secretly collaborated with the Germans during the war and betrayed his partisans to the Nazis. Later I learned that this book was published in 1951 in a large print run. And its author - Orest Maltsev - received the Stalin Premium for it.

And now I see that it was enough for some of the foreign communists to stand in opposition to the Kremlin or to contradict them in some way - so that he could easily get from them the epithet of a fascist, a traitor and other bad accusations
 
Nov 2015
1,925
Kyiv
#34
Tito led Yugoslavia away from Moscow. And for the Russians this ended up with two Yugoslav goods stores appearing in Moscow - Belgrade and Yadran.



When I was in Moscow in the early 1980s, I was advised to go to Yadran. The store was on the outskirts of the Moscow city. I remember that somewhere far on the horizon there was a peak at Moscow University - although the university was on the same side of Moscow as this store. And it was always a huge - for three hours - the queue to this store

The selection of goods there was small. But the citizens of the Country of Soviets were simply happy to get in this store. The quality of Yugoslav goods was practically "capitalistic." There I bought my wife a short faux fur coat for more120 rubles and some Yugoslav cosmetics.

But another time I didn’t go there. Endless Soviet queues for import consumer goods ("дефициты") - this was not for me
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,131
SoCal
#35
A lot, actually. That is why some Yugoslav Communists sided with him. I have read the transcripts from Yugoslav Communist Party sessions of the time. Many members were shocked that Stalin was criticizing them and could not believe it because they believed the Yugoslav Communist Party was faithful to Stalinist ideals. In fact, Yugoslavia's initial response to Stalin's criticism was to actually speed up the "Stalinization" process, namely speeding up collectivization in order to prove to Stalin that he had been wrong in criticizing them. However, by 1950 it became clear that Stalin would not "drop the charges" against Yugoslavia and the Yugoslav leadership started pursuing their own path.
Reading this, it does seem rather stupid that Stalin chose to pick a fight with Tito, does it not?

The Soviets believed that the introduction of this Western currency into their sector of Berlin would weaken the Soviet grip there. In fact, the Soviets actually proposed to accept the currency reform under the condition that this reform now be done by all 4 Allied occupying powers, not just the Western ones, but the US State Department was unwilling to allow this because they feared it would give the Soviets too much power. So, the Soviets decided to block this new Western currency. As Patrick Dean told a Canadian diplomat, the Soviet actions were "exactly what Britain would have followed in the opposite contingency."
Do you agree with Patrick Dean's analysis in regards to this?
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,413
Republika Srpska
#36
Reading this, it does seem rather stupid that Stalin chose to pick a fight with Tito, does it not?
It does, but Stalin believed that his word would be enough to depose Tito. In a sense he overrated his influence.

Do you agree with Patrick Dean's analysis in regards to this?
Yes. The West was just as willing to do some shady and not so easily justifiable things as the East. Now, would Britain LITERALLY have done the same is a tough question, but they would have made moves to weaken the other side for sure.