Can you sketch in your head a battlefield while reading a text?

Dec 2016
123
Spain
I find tedious to follow some readings of battle accounts / narrations because the author didn't provide a single map sketching the positions of each army and movements. That's the reason I really value when a book contains maps or any sort of drawings to follow the battle events. But unfortunately in most cases, the author/s don't include any visual information at all!. Are you familiar with this situation? Yes? In such case, is there anything helpful I can do to understand at least the basics of these battle events and avoid missing so many details that I end up more confused than interested?
 
Sep 2019
95
Turkey
I find tedious to follow some readings of battle accounts / narrations because the author didn't provide a single map sketching the positions of each army and movements. That's the reason I really value when a book contains maps or any sort of drawings to follow the battle events. But unfortunately in most cases, the author/s don't include any visual information at all!. Are you familiar with this situation? Yes? In such case, is there anything helpful I can do to understand at least the basics of these battle events and avoid missing so many details that I end up more confused than interested?
it's up to your imagination . That's what the author wants . Actually it's better . everyone perceives it differently .

Sent from my GM8 go using Tapatalk
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,758
Australia
Most first hand accounts don't give an overall picture because the narrator only witnessed his own small part in the scheme of things. It's only afterwards that others try to put the whole thing together and come up with some idea, often of varying accuracy, of what actually happened. It was Wellington who said that one may as well try to write the history of a dance as the history of a battle.
 
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MG1962a

Ad Honorem
Mar 2019
2,011
Kansas
I find tedious to follow some readings of battle accounts / narrations because the author didn't provide a single map sketching the positions of each army and movements. That's the reason I really value when a book contains maps or any sort of drawings to follow the battle events. But unfortunately in most cases, the author/s don't include any visual information at all!. Are you familiar with this situation? Yes? In such case, is there anything helpful I can do to understand at least the basics of these battle events and avoid missing so many details that I end up more confused than interested?
The times that it has bothered me I have brought the area up on google maps. Obviously when the battle the field is questionable that wont work for you. You can also find a surprising number of visualizations on youtube. One channel bazbattles does an outstanding job on many lesser known conflicts.
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,630
Dispargum
The situation is highly dependent on the author's ability to paint a verbal picture. Most academicians are terrible writers. Some locations are more conducive to word pictures than others. I also sometimes use Google maps.
 
Dec 2016
123
Spain
Most first hand accounts don't give an overall picture because the narrator only witnessed his own small part in the scheme of things. It's only afterwards that others try to put the whole thing together and come up with some idea, often of varying accuracy, of what actually happened. It was Wellington who said that one may as well try to write the history of a dance as the history of a battle.
No, no... I mean historical battles that are well documented even on wikipedia. Let's give you an example:

Battle of Lauffeld - Wikipedia

I feel dumb I can't imagine how the battle was with just a text saying something like: "The division of *somebody1* attacked the left flank of general *somebody2* and *somebody3* sent reinforcements from *whatever place1* exposing the right center so the division of *somebody4* advanced from *whatever place2* and *somebody5* retreated from..."
 

Edric Streona

Ad Honorem
Feb 2016
4,524
Japan
It depends. Allmost every “battle”study I read contains maps, and usually troop deployments on them.
So that helps imagining the field.

But when I’m reading personal accounts by soldiers, no... I don’t need one, they didn’t have one so I don’t find it necessary to follow their narrative/experience.
 
Jul 2018
309
London
Well, if it is an account of facts, there is not much place for imagination.... maps should be included every time there is the information available.