Canary Islands

LatinoEuropa

Ad Honorem
Oct 2015
5,222
Matosinhos Portugal
Ilhas Canárias

Its rediscovery is claimed by Portugal in the period prior to August 1336. Its possession, however, was attributed to the kingdom of Castile by Pope Clement VI, which raised a diplomatic protest of Afonso IV of Portugal, by letter of February 12 1345

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Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,132
Canary Islands-Spain
The first European travel to the Ocean is that of Vivaldi brothers, who wanted to reach the Indies by the West. This happened in 1291. After crossing the Gibraltar Strait, they faded out.

Then, in early 14th century, the Genoese Lancelotto Malocello arrived to the islands, and probably subjected Lanzarote (which is named by his name). The Dulcert map of 1339 only represent Lanzarote and Fuerteventura (and the little Lobos); Lanzarote is showed with the cross of Genoa




Then the Portuguese appear, in 1341. An expedition of two ships traveled south, led by the Genoese Nicoloso da Recco, and the Fiorentine Angiolino del Tegghia second in charge; they landed in several of the Canaries and had contact with the natives. This is the first non legendary, fully attested European re-discovery of the islands. Giovanni Boccaccio wrote the account of these sailors in "De Canaria".
 
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LatinoEuropa

Ad Honorem
Oct 2015
5,222
Matosinhos Portugal
Frank81 thank you for the information.



second friend say that Romans and Phoenicians have arrived before, the Canary Islands will be true or is myth?
 

pikeshot1600

Ad Honorem
Jul 2009
9,967
Frank81 thank you for the information.



second friend say that Romans and Phoenicians have arrived before, the Canary Islands will be true or is myth?
If Mediterranean peoples reached the Atlantic islands they neither recorded the feat nor did anything about it. Unless there are undiscovered inscriptions or artifacts left there, it is undoubtedly myth that Romans or Phoenicians arrived in the Canaries.
 

LatinoEuropa

Ad Honorem
Oct 2015
5,222
Matosinhos Portugal
If Mediterranean peoples reached the Atlantic islands they neither recorded the feat nor did anything about it. Unless there are undiscovered inscriptions or artifacts left there, it is undoubtedly myth that Romans or Phoenicians arrived in the Canaries.
......................

Yes, I agree with you too.

But when others discovered the Canaries, I do not know who was first the islands were already inhabited.
 

pikeshot1600

Ad Honorem
Jul 2009
9,967
......................

Yes, I agree with you too.

But when others discovered the Canaries, I do not know who was first the islands were already inhabited.
I recall reading that the indigenous inhabitants had linguistic characteristics similar to the Berbers, and were still at a neolithic stage of cultural development. Most likely they had not been in contact with Mediterranean civilizations like Rome or Carthage.

The Greeks wound up everywhere it seems, but in the absence of any source or archaeological evidence, more primitive west North African people seem to be who got there first.
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,132
Canary Islands-Spain
If Mediterranean peoples reached the Atlantic islands they neither recorded the feat nor did anything about it. Unless there are undiscovered inscriptions or artifacts left there, it is undoubtedly myth that Romans or Phoenicians arrived in the Canaries.
You'll be surprised to hear something real about this. There're lots of myths and legends on travels to Atlantic islands. But one of them is a true one. In the 1st century BC, Juba II, king of Mauretania, sent an expedition to explore the Ocean, and they were successful doing so:

Pliny the Elder, The Natural History, BOOK VI. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST, OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 37. (32.)?THE FORTUNATE ISLANDS.

There are some authors who think that beyond these are the Fortunate Islands, and some others; the number of which Sebosus gives, as well as the distances, informing us that Junonia is an island seven hundred and fifty miles distant from Gades. He states also that Pluvialia and Capraria are the same distance from Junonia, to the west; and that in Pluvi- alia the only fresh water to be obtained is rain water. He then states that at a distance of two hundred and fifty miles from these, opposite the left of Mauritania, and situate in the direction of the sun at the eighth hour, are the Fortunate Islands, one of which, from its undulating surface, has the name of Invallis, and another that of Planasia, from the peculiarity8 of its appearance. He states also that the circumference of Invallis is three hundred miles, and that trees grow to a height of one hundred and fourteen feet.

Relative to the Fortunate Islands, Juba has ascertained the following facts: that they are situate to the south in nearly a due westerly direction, and at a distance from the Purple Islands of six hundred and twenty-five miles, the sailing being made for two hundred and fifty miles due west, and then three hundred and seventy-five towards the east. He states that the first is called Ombrios, and that it presents no traces of buildings whatever; that among the mountains there is a lake, and some trees, which bear a strong resemblance to giant fennel, and from which water is extracted; that drawn from those that are black is of a bitter taste, but that produced by the white ones is agreeable and good for drinking. He states also that a second island has the name of Junonia, but that it contains nothing beyond a small temple of stone: also that in its vicinity there is another, but smaller, island of the same name, and then another called Capraria, which is infested by multitudes of huge lizards. According to the same author, in sight of these islands is Ninguaria, which has received that name from its perpetual snows; this island abounds also in fogs. The one next to it is Canaria; it contains vast multitudes of dogs of very large size, two of which were brought home to Juba: there are some traces of buildings to be seen here. While all these islands abound in fruit and birds of every kind, this one produces in great numbers the date palm which bears the caryota, also pine nuts. Honey too abounds here, and in the rivers papyrus, and the fish called silurus,15 are found. These islands, however, are greatly annoyed by the putrefying bodies of monsters, which are constantly thrown up by the sea.
 
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MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,972
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
The first European travel to the Ocean is that of Vivaldi brothers, who wanted to reach the Indies by the West. This happened in 1291. After crossing the Gibraltar Strait, they faded out...
Your statement that the first Europeans to sail in the Atlantic Ocean did so in 1291 is inaccurate.

Many natives of places on the Atlantic shores of Europe sailed in the Atlantic Ocean for fishing and trade for countless thousands of years before AD 1291, or even 1291 BC.

Europeans from the shores of the Mediterranean sailed through the pillars of Hercules into the Atlantic Ocean before the time of the Roman Empire.

So many ships sailed along the European coasts of the Roman Empire that a lighthouse, the so called "Tower of Hercules" was built at Corunna in Galicia, Spain, in or before the reign of Trajan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_Hercules
 
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