Canary Islands

Nov 2019
93
Bylanuelde,Alemannia
Maybe the oldest Bank and storageplace is to be found in Spain.

The Guanche, of this area around the cenobio ,used this place protected by the Mountain against weather and foreigners to store their goods.

 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,872
Cornwall
Maybe the oldest Bank and storageplace is to be found in Spain.

The Guanche, of this area around the cenobio ,used this place protected by the Mountain against weather and foreigners to store their goods.
'Foreigners' of course being other Guanches, the tribe next door.
 
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Nov 2019
93
Bylanuelde,Alemannia
'Foreigners' of course being other Guanches, the tribe next door.
Thats what i wanted to say ;other tribes especially from other Islands.You find same structures on the mainland called "Igoudar(plural from agadir)".The architects build them on high remote places hard to climb only one way to it and guarded by someone who lived there.The structure mainly was in line with the mountain so that youhave the Impression the Building is melting with the mountain.As beautiful these structures are they are a reminder how dangerous the world was (or still is).

Meanwile i have some hints that the guanches also used a monetary system with protocoins and not a baker system.Depends on which criteria a coin as to fullfill concordanly the first manmade coins in europe also can be found in westeurope.
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,149
Canary Islands-Spain
Maybe the oldest Bank and storageplace is to be found in Spain.

The Guanche, of this area around the cenobio ,used this place protected by the Mountain against weather and foreigners to store their goods.

Yes, and many of them were fortified

Datations on many of them point to a very old origin. We know the island was split in smaller entities always quarreling when, according to native legends, it was united under a single monarchy with capital in Gáldar. Later, two kingdoms existed, Gáldar and Telde, which split the island in two from NE to SW. We know both kingdoms carried wars between them.

Apart of protecting the harvest against invaders, the key idea here was the existence of a central authority that redistributed the food. There existed a civil power in the figure of the Guanarteme (king), and a religious figure called Faycag (the "bishop" in the European chronicles). The harvest and irrigation of fields was organized by the Faycag, the land was communal, but in order to labour it, plots were distributed among plebeians families (short haired); the warrior nobility (long haired) checked everything was fine. The product of the harvest was collected in these granaries, controled by noble officials, and then distributed through the island. It has been proved grain (toasted) was distributed in this way, while production like fish and meat was locally consumed.

The European conquest failed to achieve an inmediate success because natives retreated to this fortified areas and kept their supplies guarded. So the war was basically siege of these fortified grannaries, with long and hazardous campaigns.

In this map, some of the most important granaries are marked with asterisk

 
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johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,872
Cornwall
Thats what i wanted to say ;other tribes especially from other Islands.
It's 6 or 7 years now so a bit rusty, but when we visited North Tenerife I read up quite extensively on Fernando de Lugo's disaster at Acentejo Gorge and subsequent conquest a year later. Tenerife was divided up into around 5 kingdoms and as one might expect the North was the last to be conquered - well after Gran Canaria and indeed some of his force was made up of natives from Gran Canaria and also Candelaria region on Tenerife if I recall correctly

By sheer coincidence the little villa we booked was only a matter of about 3 or 400 meters from Acentejo Gorge. Not particularly deep but it's still there and in those days the gorge was the only way up from the coast through dense forest/scrub. His force of around 2400 men had just a few hundred survivors, including him! Ambushed by the Guanches with stones, rocks and spears. I think the northern kingdom was Tauro(??)

The village now on the east side of the gorge is La Matanza (the massacre) where we stayed. When you cross the gorge you are in La Victoria (The Victory)

Can't beat visiting exact locations!
 
Nov 2019
93
Bylanuelde,Alemannia
Ambushed by the Guanches with stones, rocks and spears.
Reminds me of the passage of Hanno pereplus it described wild men wearing Skins like in the custom of the candaleria ceremonia.When they saw the advanced phoencian boat and the carthagians they probably didnt know that it was trademission.I have a theory that the guanches were a type of hippie commune they wanted to stay in touche with nature and take only the necessary and Keep this Lifestyle they were hostile to "advanced" civilisation(thats why they dont use boats or metall) like the phoenicians or romans.
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,149
Canary Islands-Spain
It's 6 or 7 years now so a bit rusty, but when we visited North Tenerife I read up quite extensively on Fernando de Lugo's disaster at Acentejo Gorge and subsequent conquest a year later. Tenerife was divided up into around 5 kingdoms and as one might expect the North was the last to be conquered - well after Gran Canaria and indeed some of his force was made up of natives from Gran Canaria and also Candelaria region on Tenerife if I recall correctly

By sheer coincidence the little villa we booked was only a matter of about 3 or 400 meters from Acentejo Gorge. Not particularly deep but it's still there and in those days the gorge was the only way up from the coast through dense forest/scrub. His force of around 2400 men had just a few hundred survivors, including him! Ambushed by the Guanches with stones, rocks and spears. I think the northern kingdom was Tauro(??)

The village now on the east side of the gorge is La Matanza (the massacre) where we stayed. When you cross the gorge you are in La Victoria (The Victory)

Can't beat visiting exact locations!
Taoro



The kings of Tenerife were called "Mencey", thence "menceyatos"=kingdoms

5 kingdoms of war: Tegueste, Tacoronte, Taoro, Icod, Daute
4 kingdoms of peace: Anaga, Güímar, Abona, Adeje


The northern kingdoms, which were more powerful, used to bully the southern ones. Evangelization started around 1400 in Candelaria, menceyato of Güímar, and Europeans were visiting this area, for good and bad, for decades before the main invasion. The southern kingdoms saw the opportunity to get rid of their northern neighbours and allied with the Europeans

The issue, however, is a bit more complex. Taoro kingdom was the most powerful, but Adeje kingdom was the original seat of King Tinerfe, the legendary only king of the island. The mencey of Adeje had some prestige, and after the end of the conquest, mencey Ichasagua revolted in 1502 and tried to expel the invaders (who had violated the pacts enslaving population from the southern kingdoms). He was crushed anyway and suicided


The Battle of Matanza de Acentejo (or First Battle of Acentejo) took place when the Castilian army, after departing from modern Santa Cruz de Tenerife, came back from a raid into Taoro. I'll post later the area where the battle took place
 
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Nov 2019
93
Bylanuelde,Alemannia
5 kingdoms of war: Tegueste, Tacoronte, Taoro, Icod, Daute
4 kingdoms of peace: Anaga, Güímar, Abona, Adeje
I wouldnt divide them in Kingdom of war or Peace, the People in the North came to them under the rule of Benchomo in Peace and they told the spaniard that they can be Friends and they could take from the Islandfruits what they want but they would not except this Christ they´ve never heard from and did not understand what this is and they wouldn not bow down to a foreign King far away.

Anaga, Güímar, Abona, Adeje were in a Peacetreaty they excepted the new Religion of Christ and in the North there was a treaty between Tegueste, Tacoronte, Taoro but Icod and Daute they were governed by themself.

Evangelization started around 1400 in Candelaria...
Thats not correct till 1402 the canaries where not really discovered(exept a few Raids)then in the same year the norman General juan de Bethencourt landed on Lanzarote which the natives called "Titeroyagat" which was ruled by a king called Guardafia.After the spaniards landed the native came to them with respect and kindness and as a sign of friendship Guardafia allowed them to stay on the island as long as they which and let them build a fortress.Source:"Le Canarien ,de Bethencourt Juan"
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,149
Canary Islands-Spain
I wouldnt divide them in Kingdom of war or Peace, the People in the North came to them under the rule of Benchomo in Peace and they told the spaniard that they can be Friends and they could take from the Islandfruits what they want but they would not except this Christ they´ve never heard from and did not understand what this is and they wouldn not bow down to a foreign King far away.

Anaga, Güímar, Abona, Adeje were in a Peacetreaty they excepted the new Religion of Christ and in the North there was a treaty between Tegueste, Tacoronte, Taoro but Icod and Daute they were governed by themself.
Some like that, Icod and Daute were a bit on their own, and in fact, they signed peaces before warfare took place in their territory

Thats not correct till 1402 the canaries where not really discovered(exept a few Raids)then in the same year the norman General juan de Bethencourt landed on Lanzarote which the natives called "Titeroyagat" which was ruled by a king called Guardafia.After the spaniards landed the native came to them with respect and kindness and as a sign of friendship Guardafia allowed them to stay on the island as long as they which and let them build a fortress.Source:"Le Canarien ,de Bethencourt Juan"
Oh no, friend! European contacts precede the conquest by a century. There're very interesting stories before the arrival of Bethencourt, Vivaldi brothers visit is unsure, Lancelotto arrival is sure but of uncertain date, Niccoloso da Recco in 1341 gave us the first absolutely certain post-Roman account of the islands. The Virgin of Candelaria was landed on the southern coast of Tenerife probably in the 1390's, or before, in the context of Mallorquine evangelization of the Canaries. A bishopric had been stablished in Telde in 1351, and the Mallorquines tried a first evangelization of the population, stablishing three missions in Gran Canaria (Telde, Santa Catalina in Las Palmas, La Aldea), which ultimately were destroyed by natives (the missionaries were thrown alive into the "Sima de Jinámar" a deep volcanic chasm, were their bodies probably still lie). The ultimate failure of the mission must be understood in the context of increasing slave raids, since we know of many Castilian and Portuguese slave expeditions
 
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