Canary Islands

Nov 2019
93
Bylanuelde,Alemannia
Oh no, friend! European contacts precede the conquest by a century. There're very interesting stories before the arrival of Bethencourt, Vivaldi brothers visit is unsure, Lancelotto arrival is sure but of uncertain date, Niccoloso da Recco in 1341 gave us the first absolutely certain post-Roman account of the islands. The Virgin of Candelaria was landed on the southern coast of Tenerife probably in the 1390's, or before, in the context of Mallorquine evangelization of the Canaries. A bishopric had been stablished in Telde in 1351, and the Mallorquines tried a first evangelization of the population, stablishing three missions in Gran Canaria (Telde, Santa Catalina in Las Palmas, La Aldea), which ultimately were destroyed by natives (the missionaries were thrown alive into the "Sima de Jinámar" a deep volcanic chasm, were their bodies probably still lie). The ultimate failure of the mission must be understood in the context of increasing slave raids, since we know of many Castilian and Portuguese slave expeditions
Mmh...thats interessting i mean why the heck did they not let phoenicians on their Islands but towards the spanish,portugues and italians they welcomed them on their Islands.

The phoenicians for sure were dressed like Traders dont know how cathagenes traders were dressed at that time but i guess it was confortable.But the south-europeans after them were not traders in that sense too find new economic marketplaces like the phoenicians did ,no they have started the reconquista centuries ago and so is their dress.The post-roman visitor of the islands were dressed in khnight suits(except the missionaries) and i remember about a legend of the Guanches that they are wating for a savior dressed different then normal people.Is this an explanation for their behaviour or am i wrong that Hanno visited the islands ?
 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,872
Cornwall
Taoro



The kings of Tenerife were called "Mencey", thence "menceyatos"=kingdoms

5 kingdoms of war: Tegueste, Tacoronte, Taoro, Icod, Daute
4 kingdoms of peace: Anaga, Güímar, Abona, Adeje


The northern kingdoms, which were more powerful, used to bully the southern ones. Evangelization started around 1400 in Candelaria, menceyato of Güímar, and Europeans were visiting this area, for good and bad, for decades before the main invasion. The southern kingdoms saw the opportunity to get rid of their northern neighbours and allied with the Europeans

The issue, however, is a bit more complex. Taoro kingdom was the most powerful, but Adeje kingdom was the original seat of King Tinerfe, the legendary only king of the island. The mencey of Adeje had some prestige, and after the end of the conquest, mencey Ichasagua revolted in 1502 and tried to expel the invaders (who had violated the pacts enslaving population from the southern kingdoms). He was crushed anyway and suicided


The Battle of Matanza de Acentejo (or First Battle of Acentejo) took place when the Castilian army, after departing from modern Santa Cruz de Tenerife, came back from a raid into Taoro. I'll post later the area where the battle took place
Yes it's all coming back. You can actually walk the gorge if that way inclined, from the top of La Matanza down. Not the Empire's finest hour if we are honest, the first year's battle. You've probably read this little baby, which I bought at the time:


Due to a remarkable lack of other material it's about all I could find back then. The German Kuthe spent a huge amount of time doing research in Tenerife into local histories, stories and legends as well as archives, pre WWII. He wrote this historical novel about the conquest of Taoro and Lugo's 2 battles. Whilst the individual Guanche characters are necessarily mostly fictional and there are one or two errors such as the presence of rabbits - which just weren't there - it's a pretty good book and the power of his historical research comes out in it.
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,149
Canary Islands-Spain
Mmh...thats interessting i mean why the heck did they not let phoenicians on their Islands but towards the spanish,portugues and italians they welcomed them on their Islands.

The phoenicians for sure were dressed like Traders dont know how cathagenes traders were dressed at that time but i guess it was confortable.But the south-europeans after them were not traders in that sense too find new economic marketplaces like the phoenicians did ,no they have started the reconquista centuries ago and so is their dress.The post-roman visitor of the islands were dressed in khnight suits(except the missionaries) and i remember about a legend of the Guanches that they are wating for a savior dressed different then normal people.Is this an explanation for their behaviour or am i wrong that Hanno visited the islands ?
Fairly sure there isn't actually any evidence that anybody visited prior to the Spanish and Portuguese
There are Arab accounts, 12th century, of sailors visiting islands in the Ocean, where people have herds, wear skins and throw stones in fighting. Another one about a visitor called Ben-Farroukh is considered to be a forgery (I have doubts)

Between Juba expedition account (1st cenbury BC) and Niccoloso da Recco account (1341 expedition), there are no other undisputed chronicle. However, the flag of Genoa is portrayed on Lanzarote in Angelino Dulcert portolano, 1339. Curiously, only Lanzarote, Lobos and Fuerteventura are drawn and named



Also one of the ships of the Vivaldi brothers was called "Alegranza", like one of the little islands north of Lanzarote


In regard to Phoenicians and Hanno, I'd be prudent in that issue.

There are, however, legends of the natives kind of "god put ass here as a punishment", "god carried us here from the east" and so. I'd like to have a little more time to write here these legends, and also a dettailed view of the First Battle of Acentejo
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,149
Canary Islands-Spain
It is remarable that Angelino Dulcert draw some of These Igoudar like the "cenobio de valeron" on the Right sight of the portolano which shows that some of them where build at least 700years ago
I'm not sure about that castle, in anyway, fortified collective grannaries is a well stablished tradition in North Africa. For example, in Morocco:


 
Nov 2019
93
Bylanuelde,Alemannia
These granaries were also used to protected their Money like a bank i am on the opnion that the Guanche did have a monetary System ._DSC1691.JPG
Picture by Jo Hammer

These Stone can be found all over the Islands and normally they are categorized as portable rockart.On Fuerteventura a Canary-German Wolfgang Esser found a huge amount of these Stones which he describes in his Book "Atlantura".Most of the Stones are like the above ones but there are Stones like a stick some have the shape of Lanzarote,Tenerife and Fuerteventura and you find animalshaped and faceshaped Stones.

I dont see a culture of art behind These Stones ,the Guanche have a typicall style of art which i dont see here nor do i see any religious Motivation to make some rocks look like the shape of the Islands.
My explanation it is money which was shaped in an easyway and was used in the whole Archipel with diffenrt currencies.In the collection Jo hammer dicovered you find Stones from other Islands this indicates that there was economic trade between the Islands and thus ships were used.
 
Nov 2019
93
Bylanuelde,Alemannia
Beside Abstract faces and animals the guanches shaped These Stones aftter the shape of the islandsimage0-52.jpgDSC_8100.JPG
These two rocks show tenerife ;the Right one is also showing altitude beeing the TeideDSC_4841-001.JPG
Same with this one showing an Island with a high altitude these seem to be La Gomera

image02.jpg
This one is Lanzarote. There a more Island to be found, La Palma several time and Gran Canaria ,maybe Hierro too

All Stones found by Jo Hammer
Pictures by Jo Hammer