Canon complaints

kazeuma

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
2,423
Are there any canon complaints in historical novels or novels set in historical periods.

Example 1 - Peter in CS Louis's "Chronicles of Narnia" was shown early part of the movie / novel trying to enlist despite his age, in the real world the person at the board would have took one look at him ignored his age / forged his age and let him join the fight against the Nazis.

Example 2 - the works of Jane Austen though well made are all set somewhere around the regency period or near 1812, but there is no mention of the wars of Napoleon, the fear of hero xyz dying in the war or him saying he is thinking of volunteering. The fear of the hero dying would heighten the drama and encourage heroines to marry early, or in the case of the hero saying that he might volunteer might get a reluctant heroine to settle.
 

Davidius

Ad Honorem
Dec 2010
5,024
Pillium
Are there any canon complaints in historical novels or novels set in historical periods.

Example 1 - Peter in CS Louis's "Chronicles of Narnia" was shown early part of the movie / novel trying to enlist despite his age, in the real world the person at the board would have took one look at him ignored his age / forged his age and let him join the fight against the Nazis.
Peter Pevensie is 13 years old when the events of 'The Lion the witch and the wardrobe' occur.
No recruiter would have forged anything to enlist a child. In 1940 the age of majority was 18 and, whilst undoubtedly some older looking 16/17 year olds may have slipped through, a five year deficit would have been noticed (by the medical officer if no one else) and the recruiter punished.
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
Are there any canon complaints in historical novels or novels set in historical periods.

Example 1 - Peter in CS Louis's "Chronicles of Narnia" was shown early part of the movie / novel trying to enlist despite his age, in the real world the person at the board would have took one look at him ignored his age / forged his age and let him join the fight against the Nazis.

Example 2 - the works of Jane Austen though well made are all set somewhere around the regency period or near 1812, but there is no mention of the wars of Napoleon, the fear of hero xyz dying in the war or him saying he is thinking of volunteering. The fear of the hero dying would heighten the drama and encourage heroines to marry early, or in the case of the hero saying that he might volunteer might get a reluctant heroine to settle.
In Jane Austin was a contemporary to the time, she was living in the regency period when she wrote. So perhaps people didn't talk about the war or possibility of dying? (Or an unspoken prevented people from discussing it in writing?)

As as far as the Chronicles of Narnia goes, it might have depended on the recruiter. Some recruiters would have allowed Peter to join, but others, who might have a son or brother the same age, would not. Or they might realize the war would be going on for a while, when Peter was old enough they could still be fighting.