Carthaginian Archaeology on Armour

Aug 2018
191
Italy
#11
Bronze greaves from a punic necropolis in Sulky/Sulci, Sardinia, 6th-5th century bc:



Corinthian helmets from Sardinia, punic period:





A Calcidic helmet (In the bottom left corner) confiscated by the police in Sardinia along with artifacts from different periods(nuragic, roman, punic):



Sardinian troops/mercenaries were present in the carthaginian army during the battle of Himera in 480 bc and in another sicilian campaign in 397-392 bc led by Mago of Carthage against the Greeks
 
Aug 2014
3,541
Australia
#12
Sardinia isn't Carthage. Numidia isn't Carthage. It is disingenuous to imply that these cultures used the same equipment. We need sites where we know the Carthaginians were actually present at the time, and even then it is often hard to tell whether the equipment was owned by a Carthaginian or a foreign mercenary (e.g. Sardinian)
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,307
Portugal
#13
Bronze greaves from a punic necropolis in Sulky/Sulci, Sardinia, 6th-5th century bc:



Corinthian helmets from Sardinia, punic period:





A Calcidic helmet (In the bottom left corner) confiscated by the police in Sardinia along with artifacts from different periods(nuragic, roman, punic):



Sardinian troops/mercenaries were present in the carthaginian army during the battle of Himera in 480 bc and in another sicilian campaign in 397-392 bc led by Mago of Carthage against the Greeks
Curious to see that for this period the previous indigenous Nuragic helmet style seems to disappear in favour of foreigner designs.
 

Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,420
#16
Following the battle of Cannae many of Hannibal's troops used captured Roman equipment, so the kit with which they marched into Italy was probably not entirely different from that of the Romans. Most of the African infantry were probably what the Greeks would have called thyreophoroi. There is a Punic stele in fact that features a depiction of a thyreos, an oblong shield that was not all that different from those used by their Roman enemies.
 

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