Cases where a country became easier to manage as a result of it losing some territory?

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,140
Canary Islands-Spain
The Low Countries for the Spanish Empire

The Eighty Years Conflict determined the Spanish foreign policy through a century, and after its ending in 1648, the wars with unstoppable France to defend these possesions kept draining Spanish resources to the north up to 1700. When I say draining, is almost drying out Spanish resources: in the 1590's, the Low Countries defence budget was taking 4 million ducats from 9 million revenues from the crown of Castile.

People of the age knew perfectly the problem: funds and men were destined to a far country, while the Spanish Mediterranean coast was being harrassed by Muslim piracy, and the Atlantic routes were so by Protestant enemies. Advocates of keeping fighting argued some advantages:

-The King could not let this province to go out without fighting, otherwise other territories inside the Monarchy realm, and kings of other countries, would loose respect to the King of Spain. This was a kind of Vietnam War role in Indochina and the Cold War eara.

-"Put fire in their homes" was important too: the Low Countries was considered, correctly, to be an excelent base where to attack the enemies of the King in the area. From their Burgundian possesions, the Spanish armies intervened in the French religions wars, in the affairs of Germany, in the British Isles. In general, all northern Europe was heavily distorted as well due to this alien military presence: the Spanish navy and their corsairs from Dunkirk, for example, severely disrupted trading and fishing from Cornualles to Denmark, and almost to Iceland if needed to protect the King's possesions

For sure, the war in the area was one with some geoestrategic advantages for Spain: the build up of a formidable military force in a very strategic part of Europe allowed Spain to carry on interventions in a decisive way. And so, the "War of Flandre" was part of the Spanish great power performance

At the end, the Low Countries really distorted the Spanish foreign policy. When Austria got the territory, Spain could finally focuse on a true Atlantic policy, and this was part of the "silver age" of the Spanish Empire in the 18th century
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,423
SoCal
Pakistan losing East Pakistan.
South Sudan separating from Sudan
Yep and Yep. :)

The Low Countries for the Spanish Empire

The Eighty Years Conflict determined the Spanish foreign policy through a century, and after its ending in 1648, the wars with unstoppable France to defend these possesions kept draining Spanish resources to the north up to 1700. When I say draining, is almost drying out Spanish resources: in the 1590's, the Low Countries defence budget was taking 4 million ducats from 9 million revenues from the crown of Castile.

People of the age knew perfectly the problem: funds and men were destined to a far country, while the Spanish Mediterranean coast was being harrassed by Muslim piracy, and the Atlantic routes were so by Protestant enemies. Advocates of keeping fighting argued some advantages:

-The King could not let this province to go out without fighting, otherwise other territories inside the Monarchy realm, and kings of other countries, would loose respect to the King of Spain. This was a kind of Vietnam War role in Indochina and the Cold War eara.

-"Put fire in their homes" was important too: the Low Countries was considered, correctly, to be an excelent base where to attack the enemies of the King in the area. From their Burgundian possesions, the Spanish armies intervened in the French religions wars, in the affairs of Germany, in the British Isles. In general, all northern Europe was heavily distorted as well due to this alien military presence: the Spanish navy and their corsairs from Dunkirk, for example, severely disrupted trading and fishing from Cornualles to Denmark, and almost to Iceland if needed to protect the King's possesions

For sure, the war in the area was one with some geoestrategic advantages for Spain: the build up of a formidable military force in a very strategic part of Europe allowed Spain to carry on interventions in a decisive way. And so, the "War of Flandre" was part of the Spanish great power performance

At the end, the Low Countries really distorted the Spanish foreign policy. When Austria got the territory, Spain could finally focuse on a true Atlantic policy, and this was part of the "silver age" of the Spanish Empire in the 18th century
Good example. :)
 

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,511
Netherlands
The Roman empire would be a prime example. It was too big to manage, so they split it, sort of.
Russia also seems to be doing better than as a Soviet Union.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,423
SoCal
So how was Pakistan profiting? They have a military takeover every decade or so.
It allowed the Punjabis to dominate the country without dealing with "those pesky Bengalis", no?

The Roman empire would be a prime example. It was too big to manage, so they split it, sort of.
Yeah, I guess that this would work for this.

Russia also seems to be doing better than as a Soviet Union.
Well, it certainly no longer has to subsidize the Caucasus and Central Asia. :) Russia does appear to be upset about the fact that a lot of the ex-USSR's industry ended up outside of Russia's borders, though--specifically in Belarus and Ukraine.[/QUOTE]
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,983
India
Well, it certainly no longer has to subsidize the Caucasus and Central Asia. :) Russia does appear to be upset about the fact that a lot of the ex-USSR's industry ended up outside of Russia's borders, though--specifically in Belarus and Ukraine.
Economic hardship was acute for Russia and other republic after the dissolution of Soviet Union.
 
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Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,983
India
The Roman empire would be a prime example. It was too big to manage, so they split it, sort of.
Russia also seems to be doing better than as a Soviet Union.
Punjabis dominated army and now even the country was a Punjabi majority. Beside that, East Pakistan shared more sort of reformist mentality while West Pakistan was feudal and hardline Islamists. West Pakistanis saw East Pakistan as culturally Hindus.
 
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