Cases where competing claims to a throne were eliminated as a result of the extinction of one royal line

Futurist

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May 2014
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Which cases have there been where competing claims to a throne were eliminated as a result of one royal line dying out?

So far, I could think of:

-The Bourbon-Orleanist dispute over the French throne between 1830 and 1883, which was resolved by the extinction of the elder line of the House of Bourbon in 1883 through the death of Henri, Count of Chambord. After Henri's death, most of his supporters began supporting the Orleanist claim to the French throne.

-The Carlist claim to the Spanish throne, which was resolved by the extinction of the Carlist line in 1936. Afterwards, some Carlists supported the claim of former King Alfonso XIII and his descendants to the Spanish throne--though some Carlists instead supported the claim of the Parma line to the Spanish throne.

-This hasn't happened yet, but in the event that Emanuele Filiberto, Prince of Venice will be unable to produce a legitimate son before he dies (and given that his wife is already 50+ years old, the odds of this appear to be pretty high), the elder branch of the House of Savoy will eventually become extinct with Emanuele Filiberto's death. In such a scenario, I suspect that most of their supporters are likely to begin supporting the claim of the Dukes of Aosta to the Italian throne:

Line of succession to the former Italian throne - Wikipedia

Anyway, what other cases of this have there been or are likely to be in the future?
 
Apr 2017
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The Hohenstaufens of Germany/Italy after the death of Frederick II. The French the last main family line member, extinguishing the dynasty and causing the Interregnum.
 
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Futurist

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The Hohenstaufens of Germany/Italy after the death of Frederick II. The French the last main family line member, extinguishing the dynasty and causing the Interregnum.
You mean "killed the last main family line member," correct?

Also, how was this Interregum resolved?
 

Chlodio

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Aug 2016
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The 6th century Merovingians had the curious habit of dividing the throne between all sons of the father king. This led to a regular pattern of division and reconsolidation of the Merovingian throne. Usually the reconsolidation was accomplished via civil war as literally brother fought brother or cousin fought cousin. The losers usually died in battle or were assassinated by close family members. An exception was with the immediate descendants of Clovis (d. 511). He left four sons: Theuderic (d. 534) left one son, Theudebert (d. 548), who had one son, Theudebald who died in 555 barely out of his teens and not yet married or a father. The second son of Clovis was Chlodomer who died in battle against the Burgundians in 524 leaving three young sons. Two of them were murdered by Chlodomer's brothers. The third was put into a monastery and consequently had no descendants. The third son of Clovis, Childebert I (d. 558), had only daughters. The fourth son of Clovis, Lothar I, lived until 561 and one by one acquired the other three kingdoms, ruling a reconsolidated Frankish kingdom for the last three years of his life. Upon Lothar's death the kingdom was once again divided among the four sons of Lothar.

Lothar's oldest son, Charibert, died in 567 leaving no sons. Guntram (d. 593) had four sons but all predeceased him. Chilperic had eight sons but seven predeceased him. Lothar II was the sole surviving son of Chilperic. Sigebert I had one son, Childebert II, who fathered two sons, Theudebert II and Theuderic II, and then died young. Theuderic later murdered Theudebert (612) only to be defeated, captured, and murdered by Lothar II in 614 resulting in a reunited Frankish kingdom.
 
Apr 2017
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You mean "killed the last main family line member," correct?

Also, how was this Interregum resolved?
Oh, yes sorry. I rephrased it and forgot to add killed. The Interregnum technically started with the death of Frederick II in 1250 and lasted until 1273 with the election of Rudolf of Hapsburg (the first Hapsburg emperor but did not yet secure the title for his family). During this time the imperial electors couldn't reach a consensus on who would be emperor. Imperial power declined during this time and never recovered (it was declining over a long period of time, this just being one of many important events that contributed to it). The electors chose Rudolf because he bribed/allied with the majority of them. I also heard they thought he would be easy to control, but wasn't (can't confirm that).
 
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Lord Fairfax

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
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Changing trains at Terrapin Station...
Which cases have there been where competing claims to a throne were eliminated as a result of one royal line dying out?

So far, I could think of:

-The Bourbon-Orleanist dispute over the French throne between 1830 and 1883, which was resolved by the extinction of the elder line of the House of Bourbon in 1883 through the death of Henri, Count of Chambord. After Henri's death, most of his supporters began supporting the Orleanist claim to the French throne.

-The Carlist claim to the Spanish throne, which was resolved by the extinction of the Carlist line in 1936. Afterwards, some Carlists supported the claim of former King Alfonso XIII and his descendants to the Spanish throne--though some Carlists instead supported the claim of the Parma line to the Spanish throne.

-This hasn't happened yet, but in the event that Emanuele Filiberto, Prince of Venice will be unable to produce a legitimate son before he dies (and given that his wife is already 50+ years old, the odds of this appear to be pretty high), the elder branch of the House of Savoy will eventually become extinct with Emanuele Filiberto's death. In such a scenario, I suspect that most of their supporters are likely to begin supporting the claim of the Dukes of Aosta to the Italian throne:

Line of succession to the former Italian throne - Wikipedia

Anyway, what other cases of this have there been or are likely to be in the future?
With the death of Richard III, the legitimate Plantagenet line was extinct, replaced by the Tudor(Beaufort) line.
 
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Futurist

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May 2014
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The Obrenovići and the Karađorđevići of Serbia. Their dynastic conflict ended in 1903 with the end of the Obrenović dynasty.
Did no Obrenovic royal family members survive the 1903 coup in Serbia? Not even distant cousins?
 

Futurist

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May 2014
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With the death of Richard III, the legitimate Plantagenet line was extinct, replaced by the Tudor(Beaufort) line.
Actually, the legitimate Plantagenet line became extinct in 1499 with the execution of its last male family member. The Plantagenets lost power in 1485, but their line survived for an additional 14 years afterwards.
 

Kotromanic

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Dec 2011
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Did no Obrenovic royal family members survive the 1903 coup in Serbia? Not even distant cousins?
I'd say that this isn't an example of what you are specifically asking for.

And, to be frank, the pedigree of both of these houses is, well, remarkably recent in the context of Merovingians versus Carolingians versus Robertians on down to Valois!

A one-time very prolific contributor to Historum had once mentioned in a PM that a great aunt of his had married one of the "adjunct" Obrenovici, and I am guessing this wedding happened post 1918. This wasn't a guy prone to exaggeration in his posts, but who knows whether this actually happened? Just a fun fact. ;)
 
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